Homeless people, Yakuza gangsters’ nuclear cannon fodder in Fukushima


This is a music video from Japan, with English subtitles. Its lyrics are against TEPCO, owners of the Fukushima disaster nuclear plant.

The video says about itself:

27 Sep 2011

The title of the song in Japanese is a play on words. It basically means “Let’s go work for TEPCO“, the company whose nuclear reactors blew up after the earthquake in Japan on March 11th 2011. It can also mean “Overthrow TEPCO and decommission the reactor”. Over 6 months has passed since the disaster, but the company is still trying to hide its secrets. The government is too weak to nationalize TEPCO or let it fall into bankruptcy.

TEPCO is supported by the major banks, insurance companies and industrial companies of Japan. Particularly Toshiba which owns Westinghouse, Hitachi which owns General Electric, and Mitsubishi. Hitachi and Mitsubishi recently merged their nuclear businesses together. These are the only companies with the capacity to manufacture nuclear reactors.

The Japanese public has turned against nuclear power, so these companies are now pushing hard to export nuclear power to developing countries. Even though in “safety-first” “high-tech” Japan, their product has blown up, even now spewing toxic radioactive waste into the air, land and sea, they still can’t give up this dangerous technology, and are still desperate to make a profit from Plutonium!

The previous Prime Minister was pushed out after merely suggesting Japan should reduce its reliance on Nuclear Power. We need you – yes YOU to do something! Please don’t buy a single TV, a single dishwasher, a single car, a single solar panel, a single battery… in short, please don’t buy anything produced by these companies until they give up their ambition for world destruction!

Thousands of people have had to flee their homes, farmers can’t sell their produce and are facing bankruptcy (some have already comitted suicide), all because these companies wanted to squeeze the last yen out of 40-year-old Nuclear Reactors!

The Fukushima disaster may have slipped out of the world’s headlines, but it’s still a living hell for those cleaning up the mess. The dirtiest, most dangerous work is done by homeless people, literally recruited off the street by one of hundreds of subcontracting companies, many run by the Yakuza, the Japanese Mafia.

Japan is renowned for its technology, but even the Japanese couldn’t keep these reactors under control. Hitachi, Toshiba and Mitsubishi could make money from products that actually benifit the human race, but they still refuse to see that Nuclear Energy is dead-end, 20th century technology. Please, please, please support this campaign! If their stock drops even one yen, the children of Fukushima will love you for it!

This video is called Plight of homeless in Fukushima cleanup.

From Reuters news agency:

Special Report: Japan’s homeless recruited for murky Fukushima clean-up

By Mari Saito and Antoni Slodkowski

SENDAI, Japan Mon Dec 30, 2013 4:22am EST

Seiji Sasa hits the train station in this northern Japanese city before dawn most mornings to prowl for homeless men.

He isn’t a social worker. He’s a recruiter. The men in Sendai Station are potential laborers that Sasa can dispatch to contractors in Japan’s nuclear disaster zone for a bounty of $100 a head.

“This is how labor recruiters like me come in every day,” Sasa says, as he strides past men sleeping on cardboard and clutching at their coats against the early winter cold.

It’s also how Japan finds people willing to accept minimum wage for one of the most undesirable jobs in the industrialized world: working on the $35 billion, taxpayer-funded effort to clean up radioactive fallout across an area of northern Japan larger than Hong Kong.

Almost three years ago, a massive earthquake and tsunami leveled villages across Japan’s northeast coast and set off multiple meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Today, the most ambitious radiation clean-up ever attempted is running behind schedule. The effort is being dogged by both a lack of oversight and a shortage of workers, according to a Reuters analysis of contracts and interviews with dozens of those involved.

In January, October and November, Japanese gangsters were arrested on charges of infiltrating construction giant Obayashi Corp’s network of decontamination subcontractors and illegally sending workers to the government-funded project.

In the October case, homeless men were rounded up at Sendai’s train station by Sasa, then put to work clearing radioactive soil and debris in Fukushima City for less than minimum wage, according to police and accounts of those involved. The men reported up through a chain of three other companies to Obayashi, Japan’s second-largest construction company.

Obayashi, which is one of more than 20 major contractors involved in government-funded radiation removal projects, has not been accused of any wrongdoing. But the spate of arrests has shown that members of Japan’s three largest criminal syndicates – Yamaguchi-gumi, Sumiyoshi-kai and Inagawa-kai – had set up black-market recruiting agencies under Obayashi.

“We are taking it very seriously that these incidents keep happening one after another,” said Junichi Ichikawa, a spokesman for Obayashi. He said the company tightened its scrutiny of its lower-tier subcontractors in order to shut out gangsters, known as the yakuza. “There were elements of what we had been doing that did not go far enough.”

OVERSIGHT LEFT TO TOP CONTRACTORS

Part of the problem in monitoring taxpayer money in Fukushima is the sheer number of companies involved in decontamination, extending from the major contractors at the top to tiny subcontractors many layers below them. The total number has not been announced. But in the 10 most contaminated towns and a highway that runs north past the gates of the wrecked plant in Fukushima, Reuters found 733 companies were performing work for the Ministry of Environment, according to partial contract terms released by the ministry in August under Japan’s information disclosure law.

Reuters found 56 subcontractors listed on environment ministry contracts worth a total of $2.5 billion in the most radiated areas of Fukushima that would have been barred from traditional public works because they had not been vetted by the construction ministry.

The 2011 law that regulates decontamination put control under the environment ministry, the largest spending program ever managed by the 10-year-old agency. The same law also effectively loosened controls on bidders, making it possible for firms to win radiation removal contracts without the basic disclosure and certification required for participating in public works such as road construction.

Reuters also found five firms working for the Ministry of Environment that could not be identified. They had no construction ministry registration, no listed phone number or website, and Reuters could not find a basic corporate registration disclosing ownership. There was also no record of the firms in the database of Japan’s largest credit research firm, Teikoku Databank.

“As a general matter, in cases like this, we would have to start by looking at whether a company like this is real,” said Shigenobu Abe, a researcher at Teikoku Databank. “After that, it would be necessary to look at whether this is an active company and at the background of its executive and directors.”

Responsibility for monitoring the hiring, safety records and suitability of hundreds of small firms involved in Fukushima’s decontamination rests with the top contractors, including Kajima Corp, Taisei Corp and Shimizu Corp, officials said.

“In reality, major contractors manage each work site,” said Hide Motonaga, deputy director of the radiation clean-up division of the environment ministry.

But, as a practical matter, many of the construction companies involved in the clean-up say it is impossible to monitor what is happening on the ground because of the multiple layers of contracts for each job that keep the top contractors removed from those doing the work.

“If you started looking at every single person, the project wouldn’t move forward. You wouldn’t get a tenth of the people you need,” said Yukio Suganuma, president of Aisogo Service, a construction company that was hired in 2012 to clean up radioactive fallout from streets in the town of Tamura.

The sprawl of small firms working in Fukushima is an unintended consequence of Japan’s legacy of tight labor-market regulations combined with the aging population’s deepening shortage of workers. Japan’s construction companies cannot afford to keep a large payroll and dispatching temporary workers to construction sites is prohibited. As a result, smaller firms step into the gap, promising workers in exchange for a cut of their wages.

Below these official subcontractors, a shadowy network of gangsters and illegal brokers who hire homeless men has also become active in Fukushima. Ministry of Environment contracts in the most radioactive areas of Fukushima prefecture are particularly lucrative because the government pays an additional $100 in hazard allowance per day for each worker.

Takayoshi Igarashi, a lawyer and professor at Hosei University, said the initial rush to find companies for decontamination was understandable in the immediate aftermath of the disaster when the priority was emergency response. But he said the government now needs to tighten its scrutiny to prevent a range of abuses, including bid rigging.

“There are many unknown entities getting involved in decontamination projects,” said Igarashi, a former advisor to ex-Prime Minister Naoto Kan. “There needs to be a thorough check on what companies are working on what, and when. I think it’s probably completely lawless if the top contractors are not thoroughly checking.”

The Ministry of Environment announced on Thursday that work on the most contaminated sites would take two to three years longer than the original March 2014 deadline. That means many of the more than 60,000 who lived in the area before the disaster will remain unable to return home until six years after the disaster.

Earlier this month, Abe, who pledged his government would “take full responsibility for the rebirth of Fukushima” boosted the budget for decontamination to $35 billion, including funds to create a facility to store radioactive soil and other waste near the wrecked nuclear plant.

‘DON’T ASK QUESTIONS’

Japan has always had a gray market of day labor centered in Tokyo and Osaka. A small army of day laborers was employed to build the stadiums and parks for the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo. But over the past year, Sendai, the biggest city in the disaster zone, has emerged as a hiring hub for homeless men. Many work clearing rubble left behind by the 2011 tsunami and cleaning up radioactive hotspots by removing topsoil, cutting grass and scrubbing down houses around the destroyed nuclear plant, workers and city officials say.

Seiji Sasa, 67, a broad-shouldered former wrestling promoter, was photographed by undercover police recruiting homeless men at the Sendai train station to work in the nuclear cleanup. The workers were then handed off through a chain of companies reporting up to Obayashi, as part of a $1.4 million contract to decontaminate roads in Fukushima, police say.

“I don’t ask questions; that’s not my job,” Sasa said in an interview with Reuters. “I just find people and send them to work. I send them and get money in exchange. That’s it. I don’t get involved in what happens after that.”

Only a third of the money allocated for wages by Obayashi’s top contractor made it to the workers Sasa had found. The rest was skimmed by middlemen, police say. After deductions for food and lodging, that left workers with an hourly rate of about $6, just below the minimum wage equal to about $6.50 per hour in Fukushima, according to wage data provided by police. Some of the homeless men ended up in debt after fees for food and housing were deducted, police say.

Sasa was arrested in November and released without being charged. Police were after his client, Mitsunori Nishimura, a local Inagawa-kai gangster. Nishimura housed workers in cramped dorms on the edge of Sendai and skimmed an estimated $10,000 of public funding intended for their wages each month, police say.

Nishimura, who could not be reached for comment, was arrested and paid a $2,500 fine. Nishimura is widely known in Sendai. Seiryu Home, a shelter funded by the city, had sent other homeless men to work for him on recovery jobs after the 2011 disaster.

“He seemed like such a nice guy,” said Yota Iozawa, a shelter manager. “It was bad luck. I can’t investigate everything about every company.”

In the incident that prompted his arrest, Nishimura placed his workers with Shinei Clean, a company with about 15 employees based on a winding farm road south of Sendai. Police turned up there to arrest Shinei’s president, Toshiaki Osada, after a search of his office, according to Tatsuya Shoji, who is both Osada’s nephew and a company manager. Shinei had sent dump trucks to sort debris from the disaster. “Everyone is involved in sending workers,” said Shoji. “I guess we just happened to get caught this time.”

Osada, who could not be reached for comment, was fined about $5,000. Shinei was also fined about $5,000.

‘RUN BY GANGS’

The trail from Shinei led police to a slightly larger neighboring company with about 30 employees, Fujisai Couken. Fujisai says it was under pressure from a larger contractor, Raito Kogyo, to provide workers for Fukushima. Kenichi Sayama, Fujisai’s general manger, said his company only made about $10 per day per worker it outsourced. When the job appeared to be going too slowly, Fujisai asked Shinei for more help and they turned to Nishimura.

A Fujisai manager, Fuminori Hayashi, was arrested and paid a $5,000 fine, police said. Fujisai also paid a $5,000 fine.

“If you don’t get involved (with gangs), you’re not going to get enough workers,” said Sayama, Fujisai’s general manager. “The construction industry is 90 percent run by gangs.”

Raito Kogyo, a top-tier subcontractor to Obayashi, has about 300 workers in decontamination projects around Fukushima and owns subsidiaries in both Japan and the United States. Raito agreed that the project faced a shortage of workers but said it had been deceived. Raito said it was unaware of a shadow contractor under Fujisai tied to organized crime.

“We can only check on lower-tier subcontractors if they are honest with us,” said Tomoyuki Yamane, head of marketing for Raito. Raito and Obayashi were not accused of any wrongdoing and were not penalized.

Other firms receiving government contracts in the decontamination zone have hired homeless men from Sasa, including Shuto Kogyo, a firm based in Himeji, western Japan.

“He sends people in, but they don’t stick around for long,” said Fujiko Kaneda, 70, who runs Shuto with her son, Seiki Shuto. “He gathers people in front of the station and sends them to our dorm.”

Kaneda invested about $600,000 to cash in on the reconstruction boom. Shuto converted an abandoned roadhouse north of Sendai into a dorm to house workers on reconstruction jobs such as clearing tsunami debris. The company also won two contracts awarded by the Ministry of Environment to clean up two of the most heavily contaminated townships.

Kaneda had been arrested in 2009 along with her son, Seiki, for charging illegally high interest rates on loans to pensioners. Kaneda signed an admission of guilt for police, a document she says she did not understand, and paid a fine of $8,000. Seiki was given a sentence of two years prison time suspended for four years and paid a $20,000 fine, according to police. Seiki declined to comment.

UNPAID WAGE CLAIMS

In Fukushima, Shuto has faced at least two claims with local labor regulators over unpaid wages, according to Kaneda. In a separate case, a 55-year-old homeless man reported being paid the equivalent of $10 for a full month of work at Shuto. The worker’s paystub, reviewed by Reuters, showed charges for food, accommodation and laundry were docked from his monthly pay equivalent to about $1,500, leaving him with $10 at the end of the August.

The man turned up broke and homeless at Sendai Station in October after working for Shuto, but disappeared soon afterwards, according to Yasuhiro Aoki, a Baptist pastor and homeless advocate.

Kaneda confirmed the man had worked for her but said she treats her workers fairly. She said Shuto Kogyo pays workers at least $80 for a day’s work while docking the equivalent of $35 for food. Many of her workers end up borrowing from her to make ends meet, she said. One of them had owed her $20,000 before beginning work in Fukushima, she says. The balance has come down recently, but then he borrowed another $2,000 for the year-end holidays.

“He will never be able to pay me back,” she said.

The problem of workers running themselves into debt is widespread. “Many homeless people are just put into dormitories, and the fees for lodging and food are automatically docked from their wages,” said Aoki, the pastor. “Then at the end of the month, they’re left with no pay at all.”

Shizuya Nishiyama, 57, says he briefly worked for Shuto clearing rubble. He now sleeps on a cardboard box in Sendai Station. He says he left after a dispute over wages, one of several he has had with construction firms, including two handling decontamination jobs.

Nishiyama’s first employer in Sendai offered him $90 a day for his first job clearing tsunami debris. But he was made to pay as much as $50 a day for food and lodging. He also was not paid on the days he was unable to work. On those days, though, he would still be charged for room and board. He decided he was better off living on the street than going into debt.

“We’re an easy target for recruiters,” Nishiyama said. “We turn up here with all our bags, wheeling them around and we’re easy to spot. They say to us, are you looking for work? Are you hungry? And if we haven’t eaten, they offer to find us a job.”

(Reporting by Mari Saito and Antoni Slodkowski, additional reporting by Elena Johansson, Michio Kohno, Yoko Matsudaira, Fumika Inoue, Ruairidh Villar, Sophie Knight; writing by Kevin Krolicki; editing by Bill Tarrant)

Japan’s homeless ‘recruited’ for cleaning up Fukushima nuclear plant: here.

71 thoughts on “Homeless people, Yakuza gangsters’ nuclear cannon fodder in Fukushima

  1. Reblogged this on Spirit In Action and commented:
    Thank you for posting this. I hope everyone will read and share this. Corporations are not gods. They do not own us. Why then do they continually act as tho they are and do?
    We need international solidarity to stop international corruption.

    Like

    • Yes, you are right. Corporations are not gods. They are not even individual human beings, entitled to the same individual rights as human individuals.

      Thank you so much for reblogging!

      Like

  2. Pingback: Over 70 US navy sailors suing for Fukushima radiation poisoning | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Fukushima disaster continues | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Cold winter kills American homeless | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: New York City’s homeless suffer in cold winter | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Fukushima nuclear disaster news update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Fukushima disaster news update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: Spanish waterfowl saved from poisoning by lead ammunition prohibition | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  9. Pingback: Fukushima disaster and fish | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  10. Pingback: Fukushima disaster update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  11. Pingback: Fukushima radioactive leak again | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  12. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan disaster news update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  13. Pingback: Fukushima worker sues TEPCO fat cats about radiation | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  14. Pingback: Fukushima workers to sue TEPCO fat cats | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  15. Pingback: Ebola, poverty and riches | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  16. Pingback: Nuclear radiation news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  17. Pingback: Japanese boss sends teenager to radioactive Fukushima | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  18. Pingback: No nuclear restart, Japanese judge decides | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  19. Pingback: Another Fukushima worker dies | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  20. Pingback: Japanese protest against post-Fukushima nuclear restart | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  21. Pingback: Fukushima worker sues Tepco fat cats about cancer | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  22. Pingback: Tepco fat cats refused anti-tsunami measures at Fukushima before disaster | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  23. Pingback: Fukushima disaster still continues | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  24. Pingback: New Fukushima disaster discovery | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  25. Pingback: Fukushima nuclear disaster news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  26. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan news update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  27. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan young woman about cancer | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  28. Pingback: Mass murder of Japanese disabled people | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  29. Pingback: Fukushima radioactive food smuggled into China | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  30. Pingback: Fukushima nuclear disaster continuing | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  31. Pingback: Nuclear disaster, Fukushima, Japan babies die | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  32. Pingback: Fukushima nuclear disaster, Japan, news update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  33. Pingback: Fukushima cancer patient sues TEPCO bosses | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  34. Pingback: Tsunami off Fukushima, Japan | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  35. Pingback: Vietnam scraps nuclear power plans | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  36. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan nuclear disaster update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  37. Pingback: Fukushima disaster, more expensive than estimated | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  38. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan, disaster news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  39. Pingback: Fukushima radiation worse than ever | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  40. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan nuclear disaster continuing | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  41. Pingback: Fukushima survivors’ legal victory against Japanese government | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  42. Pingback: Fukushima cancer child not in government files | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  43. Pingback: Fukushima, Japan nuclear disaster news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  44. Pingback: Novartis Big Pharma abused homeless people as ‘guinea pigs’ | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  45. Pingback: South Korea’s new government stops nuclear reactor plans | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  46. Pingback: Fukushima radiation problems in Japan | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  47. Pingback: Fukushima disaster continuing for decades more | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  48. Pingback: Fukushima disaster radioactivity below Japanese beaches | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  49. Pingback: Chernobyl disaster radioactivity in Swedish wild boars | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  50. Pingback: Chernobyl disaster radioactivity in Swedish wild boars – The Gaia Gazette

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.