American comb jellies on Dutch beach


This is a wart comb jelly video.

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands:

A beach full of comb jellies – 08-01-15

Also in winter comb jellies wash ashore. Sometimes very many of them, like on December 23, when the beach at beach post #33 on Texel was filled with hundreds of wart comb jellies. …

Wart comb jellies are from America. Probably they come along in the ballast water of ships to Europe. Since 2006, they are found in the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Wadden Sea.

Advertisements

38 thoughts on “American comb jellies on Dutch beach

  1. Pingback: Entangled seal saved by sailors | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: First Danish grey seal pup born since 500 years ago | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Spotted sandpiper, fourth ever in the Netherlands | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Living harbour porpoise beached on Texel island | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: International cave bear symposium in the Netherlands, September 2015 | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: New phylum in animal kingdom found | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: World’s biggest ship no longer has nazi criminal’s name | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: Sanderlings resting, video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  9. Pingback: Birds of Rottumerplaat desert island | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  10. Pingback: Squid eggs found on Texel island beach | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  11. Pingback: Black walnut, from North America to Texel island? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  12. Pingback: Seabirds near Dutch coast, 2011 | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  13. Pingback: Birds in danger in 2011 | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  14. Pingback: Sandwich terns of Texel island have fledged | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  15. Pingback: Great auk bones discoveries in the Netherlands | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  16. Pingback: World War I Russian submarine discovery off Sweden | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  17. Pingback: Texel island bats research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  18. Pingback: Common smoothhound shark on Texel island beach | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  19. Pingback: Vlieland fungi and birds | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  20. Pingback: New grasshopper species discovery on Texel island | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  21. Pingback: Jackdaws and sparrows of Vlieland | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  22. Pingback: Rare black-throated thrush on Texel island | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  23. Pingback: North Sea, Scotland, Iceland wildlife highlights | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  24. Pingback: Mass songbird migration in the Baltic Sea | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  25. Pingback: Unusual lumpsucker behaviour | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  26. Pingback: Rare spiny starfish in North Sea | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  27. Pingback: Sperm whales beach in Germany yet again | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  28. Pingback: Good guillemot news from Sweden | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  29. Pingback: Extinct shellfish brought back to Europe by Vikings? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  30. Pingback: Houting fish are back in the river Rhine | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  31. Pingback: Shark egg with living embryo found | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  32. Pingback: Rare angular crab on Ameland island beach | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  33. Pingback: Box tree moth on thrashcan | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  34. Pingback: Birds and dragonflies in Germany | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  35. Pingback: Dunlin and short-eared owl in Germany | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  36. Pingback: What people ate when North Sea was land | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  37. Pingback: Velvet scoters swimming | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  38. Pingback: ‘Jellyfish, not sponges, oldest animals’ | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s