Red knot research on desert island Griend


This video is about red knots (and other birds, like oystercatchers and black-headed gulls) foraging near Texel island in the Netherlands. Kees Kuip made this video.

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel:

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

How is it that we know so much about knots, while they are only in the Netherlands outside the breeding season? This is due to the extensive research carried out, where the ringing, and then the tracking of the birds is an important part of. Texel people Laurens van Kooten and Kees Kuip recently helped on the uninhabited Wadden island Griend with this research by reading rings a week long. They did not chose the best week with regard to the weather, but still, they have done useful work.

Griend and the sea: here. And here.

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