Hermit ibises and whimbrel of Morocco


This video is called Bald Ibis Ibis chauve Geronticus eremita. Feeding along the road south of Tamri, Morocco, May 2010.

After the morning, in the afternoon of 15 december our aim is to see one of the most threatened birds in the world: the hermit ibis. Apart from very few individuals in Syria, all survivors of this species, once widespread, now live in the coastal region north of Agadir in Morocco.

However, first we see a little ringed plover. And an Audouin’s gull and great black-backed gulls.

Then, a beautiful songbird which is rather common in Morocco: a Moussier’s redstart.

An osprey flies over a river delta. A Kentish plover.

Further north, a bit more inland, a coot in a river. A painted lady butterfly.

On a steep hillside, a typical habitat for the species, a black wheatear.

Still no ibis. We go further north. Then, one ibis flying along the rocky coast.

After a walk, about twenty bald ibises resting on a sandstone coastal ledge, above ten meter above the sea level. They share that rock with great cormorants and a rock pigeon. Soon, the ibises fly away, to feed near the road.

Many holes in the sandy soil. They are dug by rodents, gerbils. There are various gerbil species in Morocco: one of them is the small Egyptian gerbil. However, these holes are by a bigger species. In Europe, wheatears often nest in rabbits’ burrows. Maybe the Moroccan wheatear species nest in gerbils’ burrows.

17:45. It is nearly sunset. Along the coast, gannets flying. And a whimbrel, calling.

Hermit ibises in the Netherlands: here.

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12 thoughts on “Hermit ibises and whimbrel of Morocco

  1. Marokkaanse vogelbescherming bijna klaar voor BirdLife

    Donderdag 20 oktober 2011

    Marokko / Barend van GemerdenIn Marokko is BirdLife de samenwerking aangegaan met Groupe de Recherche pour la Protection des Oiseaux de Maroc (GREPOM). In de komende anderhalf jaar wordt deze Marokkaanse ngo, met steun van Vogelbescherming en de Spaanse BirdLife Partner SEO, klaargestoomd voor het lidmaatschap van BirdLife International.

    GREPOM bestaat al bijna twintig jaar en heeft grote expertise op het gebied van vogelonderzoek in Marokko. Door samen te werken met BirdLife wil GREPOM haar slagkracht vergroten op het gebied van natuurbescherming. Voor BirdLife is de transitie belangrijk omdat de koepelorganisatie in alle landen nationale BirdLife-vertegenwoordigers wil hebben.

    De huidige activiteiten van BirdLife in Marokko worden in 2013 overgedragen aan GREPOM. Prioriteit heeft de bescherming van de ernstig bedreigde kaalkopibis en de vele, voor Europese trekvogels belangrijke, Marokkaanse wetlands.

    http://www.vogelbescherming.nl/vogels_beschermen/internationaal/birdlifeXnieuws/q/ne_id/500

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