Mushrooms and kingfisher


This video from Italy says about itself:

A beech-marten search food near one old house named “Seghettina”.

Our fourth day in Weerribben national park began in a boat, again with park warden Jaap Dolstra.

Many mallards and a coot on a boat landing.

Many barn swallows flying overhead.

Mr Dolstra told about the reed from the Weerribben being sold for roofs etc., with an otter stamp on it.

If the reed is mixed with lesser bulrush, then the reed is not as strong and sells for less.

Trumpet weed, loved by butterflies, growing on the banks.

Pondskaters on the water surface.

We pass some of the 120 windmills of the Weerribben.

A very big spider on the bank. It is a raft spider.

Arrowhead flowers in the water.

Meadowsweet along the banks.

Most ferns here are marsh ferns. Some are narrow buckler ferns.

The common clubrush used to be material for making chairs. Today, it is rather rare here.

As more trees started growing in the Weerribben, two mammal species made their way to the national park. They are the pine marten, and the beech marten or stone marten. Stone martens are not afraid of coming close to human houses. They search for fish oil in motor cars. Jaap Dolstra found a sleeping stone marten in the attic of his house in the Weerribben. It had gnawed its way through the thatched roof. Only a radio with loud music managed to get the marten away.

About pine martens in England: here.

Many dragonflies and damselflies on this sunny day in the Weerribben.

Cycling to the western vantage point, six white storks and a grey heron in a meadow.

Northern lapwings. Close to the vantage point, a buzzard.

In the marshy forest south of Ossenzijl, many fungi. Including Amanita rubescens. And Piptoporus betulinus. And russulas with red heads.

Then, to the northern hide. Again, a kingfisher. Great cormorants.

In the evening, along the bicyle path to Kalenberg, a roe deer. On our way back, two roe deer.

Bats flying close to the windows after sunset.

6 thoughts on “Mushrooms and kingfisher

  1. Pingback: Rare dragonfly back in the Netherlands | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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