Dictatorship’s referendum in Thailand


This video says about itself:

Thai prime minister threatens to ‘execute’ journalists

25 March 2015

Thailand’s military leader has lashed out at journalists saying he would “probably just execute” those who did “not report the truth”, in the latest outburst aimed at Thailand‘s media.

“We’ll probably just execute them,” Prayuth Chan-ocha said on Wednesday, when asked by reporters how the government would deal with those that do not adhere to the official line.

“You don’t have to support the government, but you should report the truth,” the former army chief said, telling reporters to write in a way that bolsters national reconciliation in the kingdom.

Prayuth, who is also prime minister, heads the ruling military junta or National Council for Peace and Order. He toppled the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra in a coup last May, that followed months of protests aimed at ousting Yingluck.

Prayuth launched a crackdown on dissenters after seizing power in May. He has said Thailand is not ready to lift martial law, which gives the army sweeping powers, including for arrest and detention.

‘Notoriously hot-headed’

Bob Dietz, coordinator of the Committee to Protect Journalists‘ Asia Programme, condemned Prayuth’s statement saying, the Thai leader “is being more than just gruff here, it’s a threat”.

“He is notoriously hot-headed, and prone to outbursts like this,” Dietz said in a comment to Al Jazeera.

“Last September he announced a one-year plan to overcome the deep political fault lines in Thailand. So far the plan seems to just be to tell everyone to just be quiet and stop being critical of the government and each other.”

In January the junta forced a German foundation to cancel a forum on press freedom saying Thailand was at a sensitive juncture. Since taking power, the junta has made full use of martial law, which also bans all political gatherings.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Thailand: Junta asks voters to back negation of democracy

Saturday 6th August 2016

THAILAND’S voters will be asked to decide tomorrow on a new constitution, along with an accompanying measure to keep the military government in control for several years.

A Yes vote would also enshrine the vesting of a great deal of power in appointed rather than elected officials.

Despite the importance of tomorrow’s decision, there have been no political rallies, no independent campaigns and virtually no debates by order of the ruling military junta.

Over 100 people who tried to campaign against the referendum on social media have been jailed, while open criticism has been made punishable by up to 10 years behind bars.

“The lack of open campaigning is effectively a one-sided campaign,” said Chulalongkorn University political analyst Thitinan Pongsudhirak in Bangkok.

“The intention is to have campaigns for the constitution, not against the constitution, because a lot of credibility is on the line for the junta.”

He suggested, however, that the political repression “has boomeranged because the other side has gathered some steam and we are seeing more anti-charter movement rising.”

The junta, which took power in a May 2014 coup, claims that the new constitution will usher in a new era of clean politics and stable democracy in a country chronically short of both in recent years.

Critics note that, for at least a five-year “transition” period, the senate will be a 250-strong chamber whose members would be appointed by the junta and include the commanders of the army and other security services.

Thai constitutional referendum entrenches military dictatorship: here.

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2 thoughts on “Dictatorship’s referendum in Thailand

  1. Pingback: Torturing Thai tyrants threaten arrest of Amnesty International | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: King of Thailand dies | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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