163 wildlife species discovered in Asia


This video says about itself:

21 December 2016

A rainbow-headed snake resembling David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust character, a dragon-like lizard and a newt that looks like Klingon from Star Trek are among the 163 new species recently discovered by scientists in the Greater Mekong Region, according to a report released by WWF.

The report, Species Oddity, documents the work of hundreds of scientists who discovered nine amphibians, 11 fish, 14 reptiles, 126 plants and three mammals in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. These discoveries bring the total new species of plants, birds, mammals, reptiles, fish and amphibians discovered in the Greater Mekong Region to 2,409 since WWF began compiling new species reports in 1997. “These scientists, the unsung heroes of conservation, know they are racing against time to ensure that these newly discovered species are protected,” said Jimmy Borah, Wildlife Program Manager for WWF-Greater Mekong.

The Greater Mekong is also home to some of the planet’s most endangered wild species, including the tiger, saola, Asian elephant, Mekong dolphin and Mekong giant catfish. The region is under intense development pressure that threatens the survival of the natural landscapes that make it so unique. Poaching puts additional pressure on the region’s wildlife, meaning many species could be lost before they are even discovered.

A rainbow-headed snake, Parafimbrios lao, that has been likened to David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust character was found among steep karst cliffs in Northern Laos and while originally thought to exist in only one location, it has since been seen in a second one, increasing its chances of survival.

The Phuket Horned Tree Agamid, Acanthosaura phuketensis, has a fearsome set of horns on its head and spine and was found among the few remaining forest patches on the popular Thai tourist island of Phuket. It is threatened by rapid habitat loss and collection for the pet trade.

A bat, Murina kontumensis, found in the Central Highlands of Vietnam with thick and woolly fur on its head and forearms.

A newt between 6 and 7 cm long, distinguished by a dorsal ridge and unique red markings. Only the fourth newt species found to exist in Thailand. With its striking red and black markings contrasting dramatically with the green of the surrounding landscape, these newts add to the list of unique amphibians found in Thailand.

A new frog species from Cambodia and Vietnam, Leptolalax isos, has a name that is about as long as its body. At 3 cm, this diminutive amphibian is threatened by some major forces – logging, agricultural expansion and hydroelectric projects.

A gecko discovered in the remote karst mountains of Laos by a team of scientists who often had to rely on water dripping off stalactites in caves. Gekko bonkowskii is believed to be the discovery that may hold the key to understanding lizard evolution in the Annamite Mountain Range.

A rare banana species discovered in Northern Thailand. With a fluorescent red flower blossom and significant tiny flower structures differing from all other members of the banana family, only two small populations of the species have been discovered.

A plant from the Chin Hills of North-western Myanmar that has two petal coverings (sepals) resembling mouse ears. Discovered on Mount Victoria, Impatiens kingdon-wardii is a reminder that Myanmar’s rich biodiversity needs protection as the country rapidly opens up to development.

See also here.

1 thought on “163 wildlife species discovered in Asia

  1. Pingback: Partridges, pheasants, tit at Pamuling monastery | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.