Green iguana in Florida, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

31 March 2016

Large male Green Iguana basking in the Florida sun. Escaped or released pet iguanas are now freely breeding in the wild and gradually spreading northward with warm winters. Small Iguanas and their eggs have many predators that eat them limiting their numbers, but once they reach two feet tall and larger they have few natural enemies. They can reach six feet in length, but 3 or 4 feet long like this one is more common. This one was spotted in Palm Beach County. Hard winter freezes will generally limit their northward advances to around Palm Beach County. They are excellent tree climbers and although primarily herbivore will take birds and eggs in the nest if found. They are of course invasive and can be legally killed if on private property and done humanely and their meat is said to be a delicacy in central and South America.

More info:

Habits

Adult iguanas are herbivores feeding on foliage, flowers, and fruit. They will occasionally eat animal material such as insects, lizards, and other small animals, nestling birds and eggs. Juveniles eat more animal material, especially insects, and hatchling green iguanas eat the droppings of adult iguanas to acquire the gut bacteria that help them digest plant material. Males are territorial against other males, but are not territorial against females and juveniles. These large lizards like to bask in open areas, sidewalks, docks, seawalls, landscape timbers, or open mowed areas. If frightened, they dive into water (green iguanas and basilisks) or retreat into their burrows (spiny tailed iguanas). This habit of diving into the water to escape makes green iguanas very difficult to capture. Basilisks and anoles generally eat insects and small vertebrate prey, but Knight anoles occasionally eat small fruits and flowers as well.

Read more here.

3 thoughts on “Green iguana in Florida, video

  1. Pingback: Green iguana feeds in Florida | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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