Punk rockers unfairly linked to fascism on British TV


This music video from Britain says about itself:

Cockney Rejects– Oi! Oi! Oi!

15 September 2008

Cockney Rejects are an Oi! punk band that formed in the East End of London in 1979. Their song “Oi, Oi, Oi”, from their album Greatest Hits Volume 2, was the inspiration for the name of the Oi! music genre.[1] Their biggest hit record in the United Kingdom, “The Greatest Cockney Rip-Off”, was a parody of Sham 69’s song “Hersham Boys”. Other Cockney Rejects songs were less commercial, partly because they tended to be about hard-edged topics such as street fighting or football hooliganism. The band members are staunch supporters of West Ham United F.C., and their hit song “I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles” was a cover of a West Ham supporters’ chant, which had been sung since the 1920s.

The violence depicted in their lyrics was often mirrored at their concerts, and the band members often fought to defend themselves (often from supporters of opposing football teams) or to split up conflicts between audience members.[2] Jeff and Mick Geggus (who are brothers) had both been amateur youth boxers, and had fought at the national level. Cockney Rejects expressed contempt for all politicians in their lyrics, and they rejected media claims that they had a British Movement following, or that the band members supported the views of that far right group.

In their first Sounds interview, they mockingly referred to the British Movement as the “German Movement” and stated that many of their heroes were black boxers.[3] Jeff Turner’s autobiography Cockney Reject describes an incident in which the band members and their supporters had a massive fight against British Movement members at one of Cockney Rejects’ early concerts.[4]

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Punks Oi-rate over Channel 4 TV show

Saturday 17th January 2015

PUNK band Cockney Rejects hinted that it may sue Channel 4 after its music was used in documentary Young Angry and White to illustrate a supposed far-right association with the musical genre.

The longstanding group is reportedly threatening legal action as it feels song Oi Oi Oi was being associated with fascist violence.

In a recent interview with Louder Than War magazine Cockney Rejects guitarist Mick Geggus said he was so angry when he found out he “nearly choked.”

“My band and I have fought narrow-minded people from both sides of the political divide for over three decades now, and we have the scars to prove it,” Mr Geggus told fellow musician and music critic Joe Whyte.

“If it’s the last thing I do, I will not let Channel 4 get away with this slanderous act.”

The Cockney Rejects have been known to physically confront members of the neonazi British Movement who show up at their concerts.

UK Subs song Warhead was also featured despite having a a Japanese guitarist and a history of rejecting fascist politics.

This music video is called UK Subs “Warhead” (live).

Reminds me of my own UK Subs concerts memories …

2 thoughts on “Punk rockers unfairly linked to fascism on British TV

  1. Pingback: UK Subs music video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: British Rock against Racism and photography | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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