First Dutch barn swallow back from Africa


This video from the USA is called The Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

A video from the USA used to say about itself:

David Bonter, of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and vice president of the Braddock Bay Bird Observatory, took us to Braddock Bay to learn how to band birds. Watch Bonter put a tiny aluminum bracelet on a swamp sparrow.

According to the Dutch ornithologists of SOVON, yesterday, 9 March, the first barn swallow of this spring was seen in the Netherlands. It was in The Hague.

SOVON said this individual was very early and the other barn swallows will come back later from Africa.

This year is the Year of the Barn Swallow in the Netherlands.

Tree swallow photos: here.

North American cliff swallows: here.

The mystery of impeccable bird migration and their journey back to the love nest: here.

11 thoughts on “First Dutch barn swallow back from Africa

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