How porpoises swim, video


This video from Harderwijk in Gelderland province in the Netherlands says about itself:

How porpoises use their fins

28 June 2016

Harbour porpoises use their tail fluke to move forward in the water. By moving the tail up and down they are able to go forward. By using the pectoral fins they can change their direction. The dorsal fin is to stabilize the porpoise in the water. Harbour porpoise Sven is demonstrating how it works in this short footage. Sven is currently a patient in the rehab centre of SOS Dolfijn.

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