Birds, flowers and horsetails


This video shows a blackbird feeding on an apple.

On the balcony, someone had eaten apple. Was it a blackbird? A jay? Or someone else?

The siskins are gone now. Maybe they are already in Sweden.

Elsewhere, fertile common horsetail stems on the bridge.

This video is about horsetails.

About horsetails in Zeeland: here.

The small plants between the stones of the bridge have a big history. Ancestors of them already grew in the age of the dinosaurs, and long before the dinosaurs in the Carboniferous age, when some of them grew as tall as trees, unlike the small plants of today. Horsetails lived even before the Carboniferous, in the Devonian.

Below the bridge, a coot is building its nest.

A few hundred meter away, another coot standing on a half-drowned old rowing boat. It is cleaning its feathers. On the bank, a jackdaw couple is searching for food.

On the canal bank, coltsfoot flowers. Daisies. Dandelions. Lesser celandine flowers.

Still a few snowdrops, but they are almost dead.

8 thoughts on “Birds, flowers and horsetails

  1. Pingback: Coot chicks on the nest, video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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