Bahrain dictatorship’s repression continues


Unfortunately, Meles Zenawi in Ethiopia is not the only violent dictator in the world.

This video is called Bahrain doctors .. jailed for treatment.

Bahraini security forces continue to engage in systematic torture: here.

Yesterday, the European Parliament put forth a Motion for a Resolution regarding the breaches of human rights, democracy, and the rule of law in Bahrain. While expressing concerns that human rights violations have continued unabated since the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI), the Resolution called on the Bahraini security forces to cease the “violence, repression, prosecution, detention, and torture of peaceful demonstrators”: here.

From the Bahrain Center for Human Rights:

University students sentenced to 15 years imprisonment and ongoing sham trials

14 March 2012

The Bahrain Center for Human Rights expresses its grave concern over the continuous human rights violations against university students in Bahrain. A year past the start of the revolution, university students are still being subjected to injustice, unfair trials, arrests and torture.

On February 14 2011, Bahraini youth started to demand democracy and freedom from the oppressive Al Khalifa regime. Most of these youth were targeted even before the declaration of Martial Law in March, through a government-sponsored thug attack of the pro-democracy students at the University of Bahrain (UOB) during a planned protest which took place on March 13 2011. Following the state of emergency, the government targeted students in a fierce crackdown; more than 500 were expelled, many were arrested, tortured and put through sham trials. At least 6 UOB students were sentenced to 15 years imprisonment in an unfair trial lacking evidence.

Bahrain hunger striker weak after 36 days. Abdulhadi al-Khawaja is on the fifth week of a hunger strike to protest ongoing detentions in Bahrain: here.

There they sit, squeezed onto two benches in Bahrain’s criminal court: the 20 medics who were tortured into making false confessions. They were arrested last year after treating protestors at the Salmaniya Medical Complex and telling the world the truth about what had happened: here.

Syria, Bahrain: A Tale of Two Uprisings… One Fabricated, the Other Forgotten, by Finian Cunningham: here.

U.S. Navy to Give Old Boats to Bahrain: here.

5 thoughts on “Bahrain dictatorship’s repression continues

  1. Clashes flare in Bahrain on Arab Spring anniversary

    Friday, March 16, 2012, 11:52

    Dubai: Shi’ite Muslims clashed with riot police in villages across Bahrain on Thursday, the anniversary of a government crackdown last year on a pro-democracy uprising in the Gulf Arab state.

    Witnesses said youths and police faced off in Shi’ite areas including Sitra, Diraz, Malkiya, Saar, Jidhafs, Tubli and Bilad al-Qadeem, all districts outside or on the edge of the capital Manama.

    Police, who are overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim, fired tear gas, rubber bullets and sound grenades while youths threw petrol bombs – a pattern that has repeated itself almost daily for months.

    But the clashes were more intense because of the anniversary of the breakup of protests across the country by force. There were unconfirmed reports of several injuries among protesters from direct hits by tear gas canisters.

    Majority Shi’ites, who complain of political and economic marginalization, led a protest movement that erupted in February last year after revolts in Egypt and Tunisia, only to be crushed in mid-March when the government imposed martial law and brought in Saudi and United Arab Emirates troops.

    Foreign troops entered Bahrain, an island state whose tourism and banking sectors are struggling to recover from the unrest, on March 14 and emergency law was declared on March 15.

    Security forces have not used live fire since then.

    The opposition call the Saudi and UAE intervention an occupation; the government says it was to prevent any effort by Iran to help its fellow Shi’ites.

    The Sunni ruling Al Khalifa family dominates government and has resisted demands to give the parliament full powers to legislate and form governments.

    It describes youths clashing with police as hooligans and says Shi’ite leaders should do more to stop them.

    http://zeenews.india.com/news/world/clashes-flare-in-bahrain-on-arab-spring-anniversary_764106.html

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  2. Bahrain opposition supporters rally to mark anniversary of army raid on Pearl Square

    By Associated Press, Updated: Friday, March 16, 6:22 PM

    MANAMA, Bahrain — Thousands of opposition supporters rallied in Bahrain on Friday to mark the one-year anniversary of the military raid on the capital’s Pearl Square, the epicenter of last year’s Shiite uprising in the Gulf kingdom.

    Thousands of protesters waved Bahraini flags, chanted anti-government slogans and demanded the release of political prisoners during the opposition rally in Mahooz, a western suburb of Manama.

    Pearl Square in central Manama had served as the opposition’s headquarters during the first weeks of the Shiite majority’s campaign to loosen the Sunni dynasty’s grip on power in the strategic island that is the home of the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet.

    Security forces stormed the protesters’ encampment at the landmark square, after authorities imposed martial law last March and tore down the pearl sculpture that marked the site of unprecedented political upheaval in the island nation.

    The protests were inspired by other Arab revolts in Tunisia and Egypt against autocratic rulers.

    At least 45 people have been killed in the Bahrain unrest, and hundreds have been arrested and tried on anti-state crimes.

    The now heavily-guarded Pearl Square holds great symbolic value for Bahrain’s opposition movement, and protesters have repeatedly tried to retake it. But the capital has largely been off limits to demonstrators in the past year.

    Street battles between security forces and protesters still flare up almost every day in the predominantly Shiite villages around the capital.

    Shiites account for about 70 percent of Bahrain’s population of some 525,000 people, but say they have faced decades of discrimination and are blocked from top political and security posts.

    The kingdom’s ruling dynasty has promised reforms to end the upheaval, although it refuses to make the far-reaching changes the protesters and the country’s biggest opposition movement, Al Wefaq, have demanded. These include ending the monarchy’s ability to select the government, set key state policies and appoint most of the parliament members.

    Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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  3. Bahrain opposition marks raid anniversary

    March 16, 2012 10:14 PM

    AP

    MANAMA, Bahrain: Thousands of opposition supporters rallied in Bahrain on Friday to mark the one-year anniversary of the military raid on the capital’s Pearl Square, the epicenter of last year’s Shiite uprising in the Gulf kingdom.

    Thousands of protesters waved Bahraini flags, chanted anti-government slogans and demanded the release of political prisoners during the opposition rally in Mahooz, a western suburb of Manama.

    Pearl Square in central Manama had served as the opposition’s headquarters during the first weeks of the Shiite majority’s campaign to loosen the Sunni dynasty’s grip on power in the strategic island that is the home of the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet.

    Security forces stormed the protesters’ encampment at the landmark square, after authorities imposed martial law last March and tore down the pearl sculpture that marked the site of unprecedented political upheaval in the island nation.

    The protests were inspired by other Arab revolts in Tunisia and Egypt against autocratic rulers.

    At least 45 people have been killed in the Bahrain unrest, and hundreds have been arrested and tried on anti-state crimes.

    The now heavily-guarded Pearl Square holds great symbolic value for Bahrain’s opposition movement, and protesters have repeatedly tried to retake it. But the capital has largely been off limits to demonstrators in the past year.

    Street battles between security forces and protesters still flare up almost every day in the predominantly Shiite villages around the capital.

    Shiites account for about 70 percent of Bahrain’s population of some 525,000 people, but say they have faced decades of discrimination and are blocked from top political and security posts.

    The kingdom’s ruling dynasty has promised reforms to end the upheaval, although it refuses to make the far-reaching changes the protesters and the country’s biggest opposition movement, Al Wefaq, have demanded. These include ending the monarchy’s ability to select the government, set key state policies and appoint most of the parliament members.

    Like

  4. Pingback: Bahrain repression continues | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Bahrain, torture and football | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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