Wild wallaby joey in the Netherlands


This video is about Bennett´s wallabies in their native Tasmania.

From the Dutch Mammal Society:

Australian mammals settle in the Netherlands

Report issued by the Mammal Society on Tuesday, April 27, 2010

For the first time in the Netherlands, a group of feral wallabies has been seen with a joey. This might be the beginning of a population of wild wallabies. Previously, there already were adult animals in the wild, where they seem to maintain themselves well. Elsewhere in Europe, small populations of escaped animals live as well.

Ooststellingwerf

These sightings of wallabies are in Ooststellingwerf. There, a group of five animals were reported with a joey. Four years ago, wallabies escaped from a family in Makkinga, as daily De Volkskrant reported. The animals were kept there on a farm but escaped because children opened the gate. They are likely to be Bennett’s wallabies, Macropus rufogriseus. Forester Kees van Son has seeing wallabies in the area for some years. The municipality of Ooststellingwerf and the Forestry Department indicate that the animals will not be recaptured because they do not cause damage. …

Elsewhere in Europe

In other European countries, there are wild populations of Bennett’s wallabies as well. A group of about fifty animals lives on the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea, and a smaller population on the island Lambay near the Irish coast. These two groups are from zoos. Also on the British mainland, wallabies live. At Loch Lomond in Scotland in 1975, animals have been released. There, a small stable population lives now. In the Peak District, Devon and Sussex populations lived for a few decades but they became extinct naturally again. At Rambouillet in France a group of about thirty animals has been living for years.

See also here.

2 thoughts on “Wild wallaby joey in the Netherlands

  1. 08/14/2012

    Four-Legged Solidarity: Wild Animals Help Kangaroos Break Out of Zoo

    Aided by a fox and a wild boar, three kangaroos got through two fences and hopped to freedom from a wildlife park in Germany. They traveled 15 kilometers before a police posse closed in on them.

    The Rheinböllen Wildlife Park in western Germany isn’t exactly Alcatraz, but getting out isn’t easy either. The word around the troughs at mealtimes is that you need to get through two fences to reach the freedom of the surrounding forest.

    Three kangaroos made it at the weekend with the help of a young fox and a wild boar that were trying to break in, an official said on Tuesday.

    The boar made a hole in the fence surrounding the park and the fox dug its way under another fence into an enclosure where the kangaroos were kept.

    The marsupials, whose names are Jack, Mick and Skippy, didn’t hang around. They hopped off into the night and managed to get 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the park when a passerby spotted them. The last one was caught late on Monday.

    ‘Not Aggressive’

    “A very fit policewoman hurled herself onto the kangaroo. We’ve got them all back now,” the zoo’s deputy manager Michael Hoffmann told SPIEGEL ONLINE. “They’re not aggressive at all. We were worried they might get run over.”

    “At the moment there are a lot of young foxes about looking for food,” Hoffmann said. “And wild boars try to get in here too because they can dig around our meadows and don’t have to worry about getting shot.”

    Hoffmann said he couldn’t rule out further breakouts. “It would cost too much to put a stronger fence up.”

    cro

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/kangaroos-escape-from-german-zoo-with-help-from-wild-animals-a-849977.html

    Like

  2. Pingback: Kangaroo evolution and climate change in Australia | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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