New gecko species discovered in Cambodia


This video is called Saving Asia’s Wildlife – Cambodia.

From the BBC:

New cryptic gecko species is discovered in Cambodia

By Matt Walker
Editor, Earth News

A new and extremely well camouflaged species of gecko has been discovered hiding in the forests of Cambodia.

Scientists working for Fauna & Flora International found the olive-green coloured gecko in the foothills of the Cardomom Mountains.

Called Cnemaspis neangthyi, the gecko is only the second species of its kind known to live in the country.

Scientists suspect it has lain hidden for so long due to its camouflage and habit of foraging in rocky crevices.

The new species was found during a reptile and amphibian survey led in June 2007 by Dr Lee Grismer of La Sierra University in Riverside, California, US and conservation organisation Fauna and Flora International (FFI).

Since then, scientific studies have revealed it to be a species new to science, due to its unique combination of colour pattern and scale characteristics.

There are currently 75 species of Cnemapsis known to science, of which 30 live in South East Asia, with only one other species present in Cambodia.

They have a relatively ancient body plan characterised by a broad flattened head, large forward and upward directed eyes, flattened body, long widely splayed limbs, and long inflected digits that help them to climb trees and rock faces and seek refuge within crevices.

Cnemaspis are diurnal species that usually go unnoticed because of their cryptic coloration and habit of foraging on the shaded surfaces of trees and overhanging rock faces.

Cnemaspis neangthyi was found living in the rocky foothills of Cambodia’s Cardamom Mountains, and is thought to live nowhere else.

The new species is olive-green with light coloured blotches containing a central black dot.

It also has a distinct light green chevron marking on its nape and a head with a distinct black parietal spot and radiating black lines extending from its eyes.

Its digits also have light yellow and black bands.

The Cardomom Mountains support one the largest and mostly unexplored forest regions in southeast Asia, which are thought to shelter at least 62 globally threatened animal and 17 globally threatened tree species, many of which are endemic to Cambodia.

AMAZING REPTILES

One species of gecko is so light it falls much like a feather

Watch remarkable slow-motion footage of two lizards that seem to do the impossible – walk on water

Spot more species of gecko here

See also here.

New to Nature No 50: Cnemaspis psychedelica. What’s the secret behind the unique colouration of this diurnal lizard? Here.

The Gekko gigante, also known as the Gigante narrow-disked gecko, has been little- noticed by the public. Even scientists know little about the lovely gray-and-blue gecko beyond the fact that it lays its eggs on cool moist cave walls in two Philippine Islands: here.

One of the world’s last untouched forests, Cambodia’s Cardamom Mountains, to be mined: here.

February 2011: The first recorded camera-trap footage of Asian elephants mating in Cambodia’s south western Cardamom mountains has been released by Fauna & Flora International (FFI). The film is the result of years of surveying and tracking: here.

5 thoughts on “New gecko species discovered in Cambodia

  1. Pingback: Good white-shouldered ibis news in Cambodia | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: New wolf snake species discovery in Cambodia | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: New legless amphibian discovery in Cambodia | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: ‘Extinct’ amphibians rediscovered in the Philippines | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: New carnivorous plant discovered | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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