Birds of Farne Islands, England


This video from the USA says about itself:

Footage of Common and Arctic Terns by Project Puffin, off the coast of Maine.

By Stephen Moss in British daily The Guardian:

Farne Islands: Birding paradise

Arctic terns abound in “seabird city”

July 15, 2008 4:44 PM

To us birders, the Farne Islands, off the coast of Northumberland, is “seabird city”, “birding heaven”, or “the Galapagos of the north” – which may give you some idea of the sheer spectacle of seabirds found here.

This little archipelago, about an hour’s drive north of Newcastle, provides what for me is the most memorable birding experience in the whole of Britain. …

Away from the terns are the cliff-nesting birds of Farne – guillemots, razorbills, puffins, shags and my favourite, the delicate little gull known from its characteristic call as the kittiwake.

Later, as I get ready to leave, a real bonus – amongst the Arctic, Sandwich and common terns on the beach are a couple of pairs of Britain’s rarest breeding tern, the roseate.

Puffin decline in Farne islands: here.

Bridled Guillemots Uria aalge on the Farne Islands, Northumberland, UK: here.

First otter reaches Farne Islands: here.

White-beaked dolphin research around the Farne Islands: here.

1000 Sandwich terns settle at Minsmere: here.

Off the U.S. West Coast, several seabird species are suffering, and biologists suspect that global warming’s impact on the Pacific is to blame: here.

3 thoughts on “Birds of Farne Islands, England

  1. Pingback: Rare dolphins near English Farne Islands | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Bottlenose dolphins near England, videos | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: English Farne Islands, ninety years of conservation | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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