Piping plover conservation in Massachusetts, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

15 August 2014

The threatened piping plover has been the focus of intensive conservation in Massachusetts. Thanks to continuing efforts by the many partners of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and MassWildlife, the plover population here has come a long way since the shorebird was protected under the Endangered Species Act, from around 140 pairs when it was listed in 1986 to more than 650 pairs in 2013. Here are four examples of communities that are making a difference.

Plovers along the Atlantic Coast return to the Northeast in spring to breed and raise their young over the summer. If you’re visiting one of the region’s great beaches, look out for signage about this rare species. You can help us protect their nests and chicks:

-Respect all areas fenced or posted for protection of wildlife.
-Do not approach or linger near piping plovers or their nests.
-Please leave pets at home or on leash. Plovers perceive dogs as predators.
-Don’t leave or bury trash or food scraps on beaches. Garbage attracts predators that may prey upon piping plover eggs or chicks.
-Volunteer!

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