Spoonbills and plover


Yesterday, to the “Baillon’s crake reserve”.

A swiming male tufted duck; a juvenile tufted duck. A Canada goose flying.

A starling and a sleepy Egyptian goose near the footpath.

Sedge warbler and reed bunting singing.

A coot with a chick. A moorhen. A male and a female shoveler on the canal bank.

Mallard ducklings. Edible frog sound.

Two canals further, a male common pochard.

In the next canal, a little grebe diving, and two grey lag geese.

A lapwing tries to drive away a grey lag goose.

Two shelducks flying, landing.

Gadwall ducks in the southern lake.

On the land behind the lake, a lapwing with chicks already half of adult size.

A little ringed plover on a mudflat.

Two swifts flying.

In the northern lake, barnacle geese. And three spoonbills. Redshanks.

Lesser black-backed, common, and black-headed gulls.

A red admiral butterfly sits down on a stinging nettle plant. More butterjly species like this plant.

White waterlily and yellow flag flowering.

A wood sandpiper.

Great cormorants. Two common terns on a sandbank.

A barn swallow collecting mud for its nest.

Oystercatchers.

Canada goose goslings.

A blackcap singing.

One mute swan sitting on its nest, the other one standing guard besides it.

Whitethroat singing near the railroad.

On a muddy islet in the northern lake, a common sandpiper.

A woman from Suriname has been living in the neighbourhood for some time, but has discovered the reserve only today. Next time, she will bring her binoculars. She says she still has to learn about Dutch birds, knowing more about Surinamese birds.

On my way back, a pied wagtail on a southern lake mudflat.

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