South Africa: Knysna seahorse video


Knysna seahorseFrom National Geographic:

In the wild, the biggest Father’s Day presents should probably go the seahorse, one of the only male animals known to get pregnant and give birth.

Join scientists in [this video made in] South Africa as they go in search of the endangered Knysna seahorse, and explore how a seahorse dad becomes nature’s Mr. Mom.

More on the Knysna seahorse here.

And here:

The Knysna Sea Horse occurs only in South Africa and is unusual because it occurs in estuaries.

It has the most limited distribution of all seahorse species and is listed as the most threatened seahorse species in the world.

Seahorses are found in most of the world’s shallower seas – from Tasmania in the south to the English Channel in the north.

All seahorses belong to the genus Hippocampus, from the Greek words for horse (hippos) and sea monster (campus) and all have similar breeding habits.

There are between thirty and forty known species.

The largest is the Eastern Pacific Sea Horse, which measures up to 40cm and the smallest is the New Caledonian Sea Horse, which is only 15mm.

Although specimens of up to 12cm in length have been recorded, the average Knysna seahorse is about 7cm long.

Knysna elephants: here. And here.

While we’re in South Africa: Nelson Mandela biography.

5 thoughts on “South Africa: Knysna seahorse video

  1. Hi,

    I like the photo of the seahorse that you put on the website very much and I was wondering if you would be happy for me to use it for one of the projects I’m doing at college.

    Kind regards,
    Sorina Hanna

    Like

  2. Pingback: Male pipefish care for their young | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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