Spider mothers’ milk for babies


This 29 November 2018 video says about itself:

This small jumping spider is nursing her young with milk | Science News

Female Toxeus magnus spiders, native to tropical and subtropical areas in Asia, produce nutrient-rich milk to feed their young for weeks, even after the spiderlings begin to hunt on their own. Here, a 1-week-old juvenile nurses an area of its mother’s abdomen from which the milk is available.

Read more here.

From the Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters:

Mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care discovered in jumping spider

November 29, 2018

Summary: Researchers report milk provisioning in Toxeus magnus (Araneae: Salticidae), a jumping spider that mimics ants. Milk provisioning in T. magnus involves a specialized organ over an extended period, similar to mammalian lactation. The study demonstrated that mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care for sexually mature offspring have also evolved in invertebrates.

Lactation is the production and secretion of milk for the young and is a mammalian attribute. However, there have been few examples of milk provisioning in non-mammals.

In a study published in the journal Science on November 30, researchers at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences report milk provisioning in Toxeus magnus (Araneae: Salticidae), a jumping spider that mimics ants.

In a field study, researchers observed a jumping spider species whose breeding nest is composed of either several large individuals, with two or more adults, or one adult female and several juveniles.

“It’s a puzzling observation for a species assumed to be noncolonial. It’s possible that the jumping spider might provide either prolonged maternal care or delayed dispersal. We decided to test it,” said Dr. CHEN Zhanqi, the first author of the study.

The researchers assessed how offspring developed and behaved under maternal care both in laboratory conditions and in the field. No spiderlings were observed leaving the nest for foraging until they were 20 days old.

Closer observation revealed that the mother provided a seemingly nutritive fluid, hereafter called milk, to the offspring.

Milk provisioning in T. magnus involves a specialized organ over an extended period, similar to mammalian lactation. Observations under the microscope showed droplets leaking from the mother’s epigastric furrow where the spiderlings sucked milk.

The spiderlings ingest nutritious milk droplets secreted from the mother’s epigastric furrow until the subadult stage (around 40 days). If blocked from obtaining milk, the newly emerged spiders will stop development and die within 10 days, showing that milk is indispensable for offspring survival in the early stage.

Moreover, the researchers tested why parental care and milk provisioning were continued after 20 days when the spiderlings were able to forage for themselves.

The mother continued nest maintenance throughout, carrying out spiderlings’ exuviae and repairing nest damage. When receiving both maternal care and milk, 76% of the hatched offspring survived to adulthood (around 52 days).

Milk provisioning after 20 days did not affect adult survivorship, body size, sex ratio or development time, but the mother’s presence played a key role in assuring a high adult survival rate and normal body size. Thus, milk provisioning complemented their foraging in later stages.

Although the mother apparently treated all juveniles the same, only daughters were allowed to return to the breeding nest after sexual maturity. Adult sons were attacked if they tried to return. This may reduce inbreeding depression.

The findings show that in the jumping spider species, the mother invests much more than the male invests, predicting a female-biased sex ratio to be optimal for reproductive success with a polygamous mating system.

“Our findings demonstrate that mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care for sexually mature offspring have also evolved in invertebrates,” said Dr. CHEN. “We anticipate that our findings will encourage a reevaluation of the evolution of lactation and extended parental care and their occurrences across the animal kingdom.”

Also flies, beetles produce milk. Mammals not that unique: here.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Spider mothers’ milk for babies

  1. Pingback: Spiders of Spain, new study | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Spiders dating, dangerous or delicious? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.