How zebrafish get their stripes


This video from the USA says about itself:

6 November 2014

In the clip, a 10-day-old zebrafish gets its stripes in this series of images taken one a day for 30 days. Credit required: D Parichy Lab/University of Washington.

From Cardiff University in Wales:

How do zebrafish develop their stripes?

Cardiff University mathematician discovers key aspect underlining distinctive patterns of the zebrafish

September 28, 2017

A Cardiff University mathematician has thrown new light on the longstanding mystery of how zebrafish develop the distinctive striped patterns on their skin.

In a new study, Dr Thomas Woolley has simulated the intricate process that sees the pigmented skin cells of the zebrafish engaged in a game of cat and mouse as they chase after each in the early developmental stages before resting to create a final pattern.

Dr Woolley discovered that a key factor is the angles at which the cells chase after each other, and these angles can determine whether a zebrafish develops its distinctive stripes, broken stripes, polka-dot patterns or sometimes no pattern at all.

The findings have been presented in the journal Physical Review E.

Rather than have a pattern ingrained in their genetic code, zebrafish start their lives as transparent embryos before developing iconic patterns over time as they grow into adults. As is often the case in nature, many possible mutations exist and this can dictate the pattern that develops in the zebrafish.

Several researchers have studied how and why these pattern form and have concluded that it’s a result of three types of pigment cells interacting with one other. More specifically, black pigment cells (melanophores), yellow pigment cells (xanthophores) and silvery pigment cells (iridophores), chase after each other until a final pattern is reached.

As hundreds of these chases play out, the yellow cells eventually push the black cells into a position to form a distinct pattern.

Dr Woolley, from Cardiff University’s School of Mathematics, said: “Experimentalists have demonstrated that when these two types of cells are placed in a petri dish, they appear to chase after each other, a bit like pacman chasing the ghosts. However, rather than chase each other in straight lines, they appear to be chasing each other in a spiral.

“My new research has shown that the angle at which the cells chase after each other is crucial to determining the final pattern that we see on different types of zebrafish.”

In his study, Dr Woolley performed a number of computer simulations that took a broad view of how cells move and interact when the zebrafish is just a few weeks old. Different patterns were then spontaneously generated depending on the chasing rules.

By experimenting with different chasing angles in his simulations, Dr Woolley was able to successfully recreate the different patterns that are exhibited by zebrafish.

A new type of zebrafish that produces fluorescent tags in migratory embryonic nerve precursor cells could help a Rice University neurobiologist and cancer researcher find the origins of the third-most common pediatric cancer in the U.S.: here.

9 thoughts on “How zebrafish get their stripes

  1. Pingback: Saturday fact ♥ | Hope Dream Wait

  2. Pingback: Fishes’ family tree, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: How fungi grow, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Zebrafish see well, new study | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Fish scales, ancestors of hair, feathers | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Vertebrate animals, science and art | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Dragonfly wing patterns, new study | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.