‘Extinct’ fish rediscovery in Madagascar


This video from London, England says about itself:

19 Feb 2012

A short clip from a tank in the Aquarium at the ZSL London Zoo. The tank contains the following Madagascar cichlids: Pinstripe Menarambo (Paretroplus menarambo), Kotsovato (Paretroplus kieneri), Mangarahara Cichlid (Ptychochromis insolitus) and Damba Mipentina (Paretroplus maculatus).

From Wildlife Extra:

Worldwide appeal finds last remaining Madagascan fish

ZSL London Zoo’s international campaign finds lost Mangarahara cichlids in the wild

December 2013: Aquarists at ZSL London Zoo are celebrating the success of a worldwide appeal to find a female mate for a critically-endangered fish species – after a small population was found in remote Madagascar.

The Mangarahara cichlid (Ptychochromis insolitus) was believed to be lost in the wild due to intense deforestation and river diversions created for rice farming and agriculture drying up its native habitat of the Mangarahara River in Madagascar, and two of the last known individuals – both male – were residing in ZSL London Zoo’s aquarium.

After launching a desperate appeal in May 2013, hundreds of private aquarium owners, fish collectors and scientists got in touch with the zoo’s aquarium curator, Brian Zimmerman, to offer advice, support and suggestions – including a farm and business owner in Madagascar, who recognised the fish as one he’d seen in a secluded north-Madagascan town. An exploratory expedition was arranged with support from HM Ambassador in the British Embassy of Madagascar, so that, along with aquarists from Toronto Zoo in Canada, Zimmerman and Kienan Parbles from ZSL London Zoo could head off to Madagascar to search for the Mangarahara cichlid.

With help from local villagers, areas of a now-disconnected tributary from the Mangarahara River were cordoned off using nets to mark the search areas. Initially finding only other native species, the team were ecstatic when they finally found the first one of the last remaining Mangarahara cichlids in existence. Brian Zimmerman said: “We weren’t holding out much hope of finding any fish in the wild, as so much of the Mangarahara River now resembles the desert because of deforestation and intensive agricultural use.

“These cichlids have shown remarkable survival skills. We’re now doing all we can to protect these remaining fish.” As part of ZSL London Zoo’s Fish Net conservation project, which focuses on protecting freshwater species, Zimmerman and the team moved 18 of the Mangarahara cichlids to a private aquaculture facility in Madagascar, where they will receive specialist care while conservation plans are made to bring the species back from the brink of extinction.

8 Species We Thought Were Extinct But Are Actually Still Alive: here.

Slow loris twins born in Amersfoort zoo


This video is about the birth, earlier this month, of slow loris twins in the building for nocturnal animals in Amersfoort zoo in the Netherlands.

Loris trade not so slow! Learn about these incredible creatures and kick start our campaign to protect them! Here.

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Himalayan monal news


Himalayan monal, female and male

Translated from Amersfoort zoo in the Netherlands:

Himalayan monal grows up in spite of everything

Posted on September 6, 2013 at 14:27

More than three months ago, the two Himalayan monals of DierenPark Amersfoort were killed during the night by a predator, probably a fox. The female had laid two eggs immediately before that event, which remained without parents. The rapid intervention of the Amersfoort caretakers caused one of the eggs to hatch some time ago. The daughter has grown and is now on display in a safe reconstructed compound.

”The Himalayan monal couple during the last two years had eggs every now and then, but they did not hatch. Hence, we thought that these eggs would be infertile as well,” says animal nurse Ester Beije. ”To be safe rather than sorry we have laid the eggs in the incubator and this little miracle happened.”

The Himalayan monal compound was adjusted immediately after the accident. There are additional bars now placed low to the ground, so that no predators can enter. The chick is raised during the first weeks of her life with a young peacock, so they could keep each other company. The young peacock now runs among his ilk in the park.

The young lady is now just getting used to her new environment. However, she may soon welcome a mate. DierenPark Amersfoort received a Himalayan monal male which now lives in a residence next to the female. ”Next week, we expect to introduce the two birds to each other, enabling them to become the new Himalayan monal couple in DierenPark Amersfoort”, the animal caretaker says.

Australian galahs back in Avifauna zoo


An Avifauna keeper, very happy with the return of the galah parrots; photo: Avifauna

Translated from the Alphen CC site in the Netherlands:

August 27, 2013 13:18

Alphen aan den Rijn – After two days of searching, Avifauna Bird Park has back two galah cockatoos which had flown away Sunday afternoon during a bird free flight demonstration. An observant inhabitant of Woubrugge saw the birds sitting and called the park.

Avifauna says they are overjoyed about the return of the birds. ,,Thanks to all the media attention, because someone recognized the birds from the pictures.”

The park has reunited the birds with their carers.

Amsterdam zoo gets art, stuffed birds


Omnibus before the entrance of Artis, by N.M. Wijdoogen

This painting is by Dutch artist Nicolaas Martinus Wijdoogen. According to Wikipedia, it is not known exactly when he was born (1824?; or 1814?), or when he died (1898?). We do know that he had an exhibition in Amsterdam in 1848. He is said to have worked in Amsterdam until about 1852.

So, he probably painted this horsebus near the entrance of Artis zoo about 1850. The zoo had been founded rather recently then, in 1838.

Artis entrance today

This is how the Artis entrance looks today. Many things have changed, but some things still look rather similar. The horsebuses from when Wijdoogen lived are gone, of course.

Wijdoogen’s painting was recently loaned to Artis. It is exhibited in the aquarium.

Also other recently acquired art is there. Including work by Henri Verstijnen (1882-1940). He liked to paint birds and fish in Artis. Verstijnen’s granddaughter recently gave 155 of his works to the zoo.

Henri Verstijnen, Helmeted guineafowl

Other recently acquired art is by Peter Vos.

Artis acquired a stuffed birds collection as well.

White tigers, welcome back!


This video, from Amersfoort zoo in the Netherlands, says about itself (translated):

Aug 15, 2013

After a long time, people can admire the white tigers again in the zoo. As a surprise a nice breakfast for these carnivores hangs in their compound. Take a look at these spectacular images!

The tigers went back to their compound after it had been reconstructed.

Polar bear’s collar camera view, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Aug 2, 2013

A collar camera attached to a Polar bear at Oregon Zoo is providing a unique insight into the species. Whenever Tasul plays, swims, eats and sleeps a specially-designed collar tracks her movements, however slight.

It has an accelerometer attached to it which traces Tasul’s steps in three dimensions.

The research project is in collaboration with the US Geological Survey.

Research wildlife biologist, Anthony Pagano, said: “It records changes [in position] along three different axes: up and down, back and forth, and side to side.”

The technology works in a similar way in which the phone is tipped upside down.

Scientists hope the data that is collected can help them understand how polar bears in the wild are coping with changes in their environment, primarily because of climate change. Report by Ashley Fudge.

Hornbills, forty years of love


This video is called AMOROUS GREAT HORNBILLS.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Wednesday 17 Jul 2013, 21:09

Tomorrow, bird zoo Avifauna in Alphen aan den Rijn will celebrate the 40-year marriage of a great hornbill couple. The couple arrived in 1973 in the bird park and they have since been inseparable. According to Avifauna it is unique that two animals live together in a zoo for so long.

In those 40 years, the colorful couple had twelve offspring. They have been important in the international breeding program, Avifauna says. In recent years, they are still courting, but they don’t have chicks any more.

Vital interest

Avifauna explains that a good marriage is vital for hornbills, because during the breeding season the female depends on the male. The nest is in a hollow tree and its entry is almost completely bricked. The female is then locked in for about 3 months in the nest while the male gives her food.

To celebrate the anniversary the birds will get gifts on their ‘wedding day’, including a fruit garland and a basket full of maggots.