British nuclear weapons whistleblower jailed


This video about Britain says about itself:

Trident nukes whistleblower: Weapons access easier than ‘most nightclubs’

18 May 2015

The Royal Navy has launched an investigation into whistleblower William McNeilly, who exposed horrid security lapses in UK’s Trident nuclear program.

By Peter Lazenby in Britain:

Call for Trident investigation as whistleblower is locked up

Wednesday 20th May 2015

MILITARY police arrested a Royal Navy whistleblower yesterday who had gone absent without leave having exposed safety and security concerns about Trident.

Submarine technician William McNeilly, 25, went on the run after publishing an 18-page report listing a catalogue of alleged safety hazards and dangerous practices relating to Britain’s nuclear missile system and submarine fleet.

He said it amounted to “a disaster waiting happen.”

Mr McNeilly, from Belfast, has served on submarine HMS Victorious. He said the problems could cause a nuclear explosion either on underwater patrol or in docking at the four Trident submarines’ base at Faslane in Scotland.

Mr McNeilly’s report included the claim that crew members used a nuclear missile store as a gym and that test missile launches had failed. He also described security alarms being silenced and fires in missile compartments.

He said he raised the issues with seniors but was ignored. After Mr McNeilly surrendered to authorities on Monday night, the Ministry of Defence said he was being held at a military base in Scotland.

Kate Hudson, general secretary of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, called for Mr McNeilly’s allegations to be investigated.

She said: “William McNeilly warns that Cameron and others are presented with a slick show which is unrecognisable from the practice of operating Vanguard Class submarines. If this is true, and McNeilly has opened these slack and dangerous practices to the light of day, then he has done everyone a service and should be acknowledged as a whistleblower rather than vilified as a traitor or a crank.”

Against the Iraq war, new film We Are Many


This video says about itself:

Do Demonstrations Matter? Amir Amirani and Phyllis Bennis | #GRITtv

13 January 2015

On February 15, 2003, millions of people in over 800 cities on seven continents marched against the impending invasion of Iraq. It was the largest mobilization of people in human history and yet it remains a little-known story. As we approach Martin Luther King Day and think about his legacy of civic resistance, this episode looks at the recent history of the global antiwar movement, and its relevance to today.

A new documentary by this week’s guest, Amir Amirani, tells the story of the mass protests against the Iraq war. From Iraq to Egypt to Syria to today’s protests, the film looks at the legacy of that protest movement and asks, what do mass mobilizations accomplish? Amir Amirani a long time filmmaker for the BBC, tells about his process making the film.

We are also joined by one of the organizers of those historic protests, Phyllis Bennis, an activist, author, and fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies in New York, to talk about the story behind the movement.

This episode also features a profile of the activists behind one of the biggest recent US environmental victories, the struggle that helped lead to New York state’s ban on fracking. And in a commentary, Laura discusses the need for movement unity.

By Ian Sinclair in Britain:

March of the majority

Tuesday 19th May 2015

IAN SINCLAIR recommends We Are Many, Amir Amiani’s documentary on the many millions who demonstrated worldwide against the Iraq war in 2003

We Are Many
Directed by Amir Amirani
4/5

FEBRUARY 15 2003 “was the single largest mobilisation of people in the history of humanity — bar none,” notes US analyst Phyllis Bennis in We Are Many, Amir Amirani’s brilliant new documentary about the global anti-war movement against the Iraq war.

Beginning with the terrorist attacks on 9/11, Amirani uses stirring archive news footage and original interviews with key figures like Tony Benn, Clare Short, Jesse Jackson and Noam Chomsky to tell the story of that momentous day.

Around 30 million people marched in 789 major cities in over 72 countries across the world. A small rally even took place at the McMurdo research station in Antarctica. Over 1,000,000 people marched through London in the biggest protest in British history.

The story will be familiar to many Morning Star readers but the film does include many important and interesting snippets of information and analysis, such as US air force veteran Tim Goodrich blowing apart the fiction that war was a last resort. The US bombing of Iraq increased by over 500 per cent in autumn 2002 “with the purpose of trying to goad Saddam Hussein into retaliating to give us a reason to go to war,” he says.

Elsewhere Hans Blix, the chief UN weapons inspector from 2000 until 2003, amusingly explains that the US and UK “were 100 per cent sure that there were weapons of mass destruction” in Iraq though “they had zero per cent knowledge of where they were.”

And who knew that Virgin boss Richard Branson had made an unsuccessful attempt to stop the war by flying Nelson Mandela to Baghdad on the eve of the invasion?

The film ends by exploring the long-lasting impact of February 15 2003, including its role in shifting British public opinion so much that it made it impossible for the coalition government to go to war against Syria a decade later.

Amirani also tells the unknown story of how the global movement against the Iraq war inspired Egyptians to start protesting against President Hosni Mubarak. “That’s exactly when I was thinking, and others, that if we were triple that number, or four times that number, we could take down Mubarak,” notes one Egyptian activist about the March 2003 protest in Tahrir Square against the war.

Writing in the New York Times, journalist Patrick Tyler commented that the global demonstrations were “reminders that there may still be two superpowers on the planet: the United States and world public opinion.”

Taking its name from the last line of Shelley’s 1819 poem Mask of Anarchy, We Are Many is itself a moving and timely reminder of the power of activism and protest — the perfect antidote to the despair created by the new Tory majority government.

Ian Sinclair’s book The March That Shook Blair: An Oral History of 15 February 2003 is available from the Morning Star shop for £10 + £2.50P&P.

Cameron’s fox hunting plans stopped by Scottish nationalists?


This video from Britain says about itself:

Illegal Fox Hunt by Cameron’s local hunt

18 December 2012

Anti fox-hunt protesters filmed this footage of a hunt in Oxfordshire in which a fox is chased by hounds and killed. Members of the Heythrop hunt, Richard Sumner and Julian Barnfield, admitted illegally hunting a fox on land in the Cotswolds after the footage was passed to the RSPCA for investigation. They were due to be sentenced on Monday. David Cameron has previously ridden with the Heythrop hunt.

From Common Space in Scotland:

SNP could make voting U-turn and oppose Tory fox hunting plans

Angus Robertson says that party will consider voting against repeal after “massive lobbying” campaign

18 May 2015

Liam O’Hare

THE NEW team of SNP MP’s at Westminster could be set to vote against a repeal of the fox hunting ban, despite an earlier commitment to not vote on the issue.

Writing in the Guardian earlier this year, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon explicity ruled out voting on foxhunting, as part of the SNP’s policy to not vote on matters that do not impact on Scotland.

In the article on 8 February 2015, Sturgeon said: “The SNP have a longstanding position of not voting on matters that purely affect England – such as foxhunting south of the border, for example – and we stand by that.”

However this position could now be reversed with group leader at Westminster Angus Robertson saying that the 56 SNP MPs would be looking “very, very closely” at the legislation after the party has been contacted by people opposing the plans.

Scotland banned hunting with dogs in 2002, followed by England and Wales two years later.

The Conservatives have pledged to hold a House of Commons vote on repealing the ban, with Tory MP Simon Hart saying it could take place within months.

Speaking on Sky News’ Murnaghan show, Robertson insisted that the SNP would not make a decision until they had seen the legislation.

“The SNP has of course opposed fox hunting and it’s with SNP votes that now no longer continues in Scotland,” he said.

“There’s a massive lobbying operation going to try and ensure that the ban is not repealed in the rest of the UK.

“SNP MPs still have to consider the legislation, which we haven’t seen. We need to see it, but of course we will be looking at that closely.

“You do of course understand that the UK Government imposes its will on Scotland without any significant legitimacy whatsoever, so we’re having legislation foisted on Scotland with only one MP.

“So we have to look at all of the issues coming forward in this new parliament following the independence referendum on its merits and we’ll be doing that when we see the legislation that is proposed by the government.”

The SNP is now by far the third largest party at Westminster and it has claimed that it will provide the “effective opposition” to the Conservative government.

The party has traditionally not voted on “devolved” issues at Westminster, but this position was rolled back during the General Election campaign, with Nicola Sturgeon suggesting that the party may vote on issues such as the privatisation of the NHS.

Robertson says that the party will listen to those who “care passionately” about the issue before making a decision on whether to vote against the repeal of the fox-hunting ban.

“We have to look at all of the opportunities we have to exercise our voice and our vote at Westminster and we will be doing it on the basis of seeing the proposals that are actually made and then making up our mind.

“There are a lot of people who care passionately about this issue and I understand why. Many of them have been getting in touch in recent days and I would like to assure them that we will be looking at the case they’re making very, very closely and will do so on the basis of the legislation when its proposed.”

Among those calling for the SNP to vote against fox hunting is the Labour party.

“The barbarism of fox hunting is clear for all to see,” said Labour’s environment spokeswoman at Holyrood, Sarah Boyack.

“Scotland’s moral voice as part of the UK doesn’t end at Berwick-upon-Tweed and the SNP must make clear they will vote against any bill which would repeal the hunting ban.”

SNP considers voting to stop lifting of foxhunting ban: here.

New film about anti-Iraq war peace movement


This video from Britain says about itself:

WE ARE MANY – OFFICIAL TRAILER – MAY 21 NATIONWIDE SCREENINGS WITH Q&A, IN CINEMAS MAY 22

24 April 2015

To find out where the film is playing visit: www.wearemany.com/cinemas.

We Are Many tells for the first time the remarkable story of the biggest protest in history, and how it changed the world.

Eight years in the making, filmed in seven countries, and including interviews with John Le Carré, Damon Albarn, Brian Eno, Danny Glover, Mark Rylance, Richard Branson, Hans Blix and Ken Loach amongst others, it charts the birth and rise of the people power movements that are now sweeping the world, all through the prism of one extraordinary day.

On February 15th 2003, over 15 million people marched through the streets of 800 cities on every continent to voice their opposition to the proposed war in Iraq. This unprecedented global march was organised, against all odds, by a patchwork of peace campaigners in many countries, who reveal how they pulled off the historic demonstration, and whose legacy is only now unfolding.

On May 21 we will hold an exclusive live by satellite event (broadcast from Curzon Mayfair, London), after the film there will be a post screening discussion.

Journalist and broadcaster Jon Snow will host the discussion with guests including the film’s director Amir Amirani, executive producer and comedian Omid Djalili, convenor of the Stop The War Coalition Lindsey German and professor of international law at UCL Philippe Sands.

For more information about the film please visit:

www.wearemany.com
www.facebook.com/WeAreManyMovie
www.twitter.com/WeAreManyMovie

From daily The Guardian in Britain today:

We Are Many: the legacy of the global anti-war protests in 2003 – video trailer world exclusive

We Are Many, directed by Amir Amirani, explores the legacy of the global anti-war demonstrations of 15 February 2003, an event that saw an estimated million people march against the Iraq war in London alone.

Filmed over nine years, the film talks to key campaigners, including Damon Albarn, Ken Loach and the late Tony Benn, as well as those who made the decision to go to war. A special satellite screening of the film with a Q+A with Jon Snow takes place in London on 21 May, transmitted to select cinemas across the country, while the film is released on 22 May.

See it first on May 17th as part of Guardian Live at the Rio Cinema.

British children asked to imitate bitterns


Chris Packham asks children to imitate bitterns

After the red deer sound imitation contests … and the Tyrannosaurus rex sound imitation contest for children … now BBC wildlife TV presenter Chris Packham asks children up to yen years old on Twitter to imitate bittern sound for BBC TV program Springwatch.

This is a video about a bittern, February – March 2014, Belarus.