Neo-nazi bloodbath in Texas, USA


This 26 September 2016 video from Texas in the USA is called NAZI SYMPATHIZER/LAWYER DOES RANDOM SHOOTING, HOUSTON, TEXAS.

From Reuters news agency:

Houston Lawyer Shoots 9 Before Shot Dead By Police

The man was in a military-style uniform with Nazi items, and police found thousands of rounds of ammo in his car.

09/26/2016 07:47 pm ET

A Houston lawyer whose business was struggling opened fire on morning commuters on Monday, injuring at least nine people before being shot dead by police, authorities said.

Six people were taken to hospitals and three were treated at the scene after being shot at while inside their vehicles in the affluent neighborhood of West University Place, acting Houston Police Chief Martha Montalvo told reporters.

One victim was in critical condition and another was in serious condition but both were expected to survive, officials said. The Federal Bureau of Investigation said there was no indication that the shootings were linked to a radical group.

If a wannabe mass murderer wears a nazi swastika like in this case, then he very probably is not a fanatical Muslim. However, do only fanatical Muslims count as ‘radical’ in FBI speech? How about possible links to violent neo-nazi gangs?

Police declined to identify the suspect, but local media reported that he shot at vehicles from a black Porsche registered to Nathan DeSai.

Public records showed that DeSai lived in a condominium near the shooting scene and that he had no criminal record.

DeSai, who received his law degree from the University of Tulsa in 1998, started a small law firm but his former law partner, Ken McDaniel, said they closed it about six months ago.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, in Cuba to develop trade relations, told reporters, “The motivation appears to be a lawyer whose relationship with his law firm went bad.”

Police said the suspect was dressed in a military-style uniform and that military paraphernalia that included Nazi items was found in his possession.

The police bomb squad secured the shooter’s car, which contained more than 2,600 rounds of ammunition. Police said a handgun was found on the suspect’s body and a rifle was found in this car.

An agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said the firearms had been legally purchased.

Christopher Miller, who lives near the site of the shootings, said he watched much of it from his apartment. “The only way I can explain it is like a firework show; you hear a shot, a shot, then more shots, then a finale of a bunch of shots. Then you know it’s over.”

Police said more than 75 shell casings had been recovered.

(Additional reporting by Ruthy Munoz in Washington, D.C., Jon Herskovitz in Austin, Texas, Laila Kearney in New York and Sarah Marsh in Havana; Editing by Bernadette Baum and Bill Trott)

See also here.

Many hummingbirds at Texas webcam


This video from the USA says about itself:

All Out Frenzy At West Texas Hummingbird Cam – Sept. 26, 2016

The hummingbirds are hungry on this overcast September morning in the mountains outside of Fort Davis,TX.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Hummingbirds are not typically associated with winter, but depending on where you are birding during the colder months of the year is possible to see and enjoy these flying jewels even in cold regions. Winter hummingbirds are nothing new, and sightings in North America have been noticed since the 1950s. Due to more interest in these tiny birds and a better availability of supplemental feeders, however, more and more hummingbirds have been staying further north during the winter since the 1990s: here.

Texas hummingbird migration update


This video from the USA says about itself:

23 September 2016

This male Lucifer Hummingbird, curved bill and all, remains anchored to his feeder port despite all of the birds hovering around him. Did you know that some of the hummingbirds we see on cam have an average wingbeat frequency between 50-60 times per second when they’re hovering!? Their small size allows them to generate lift by using both backward and forward wing motions to “float” in the air and feed on nectar.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

For the past 10 years, researchers from West Texas Avian Research have been banding hummingbirds at this site and others throughout the Trans-Pecos region of Texas to study the status and distribution of hummingbirds throughout the poorly known region.

Ruby-throated hummingbird in Texas, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Female Ruby-throated Hummingbird Visits the West Texas Hummingbird Feeder

9 September 2016

Although Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are uncommon in the west, the cam site in the Davis Mountains has regular visitors every Fall. This visitor was identified by our cam host from West Texas Avian Research as a female Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

In comparison to Black-chinned females, Ruby-throats have overall a cleaner look with cleaner lines: clean white/tan underparts with dark green upper parts, and clear demarcation between dark and clean white throat.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

For the past 10 years, researchers from West Texas Avian Research have been banding hummingbirds at this site and others throughout the Trans-Pecos region of Texas to study the status and distribution of hummingbirds throughout the poorly known region.

Acorn woodpecker at Texas hummingbird feeder


This video from the USA says about itself:

31 August 2016

Who’s that hiding behind the Perky-Pet® feeder on the West Texas Hummingbird cam? It’s an Acorn Woodpecker that has stopped by for a quick dose of nectar.

In addition to stealing from hummingbird feeders, these aptly named individuals work communally to store up to thousands of acorns inside individually-drilled holes within designated “granary” trees.

Hummingbird videos from Texas, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Frenzied Early Morning Feeding – West Texas Hummingbirds – August 31, 2016

Even though the weather in West Texas this morning is overcast and rainy, it isn’t stopping these voracious little hummingbirds from getting a chance at the Perky-Pet® feeder.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Female Magnificent Takes a Long Drink, Shows Tongue

22 August 2016

This female Magnificent Hummingbird stopped by the Perky-Pet Feeder for a long drink. In between bouts of feeding, you can get a glimpse of its tiny tongue protruding from the beak. Recent research suggests that hummingbirds use their tongues as tiny pumps that allow the birds to quickly take-in nectar. Hummingbirds have flexible, grooved tongues that stay compressed when protruding from the bill in search of nectar. Once the tongue comes contact with a nectar source, the grooves expand and quickly load up with nectar that the bird can then lick up!

This video from the USA says about itself:

Juvenile Male Rufous Hummingbird With Partial Gorget – Aug. 25, 2016

This clip highlights a visit from a juvenile male Rufous Hummingbird that showcases an interesting pattern on his throat patch (gorget). This individual is in the process of replacing its juvenile feathers with an adult set. Immature rufous males will often be seen with variable numbers of iridescent red-orange feathers along the throat when molting into adult plumage.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Two Male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds Share Feeder – Sept. 1, 2016

Two male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds alighted on either side of the Perky-Pet® feeder this afternoon. This moment provides a good example of plumage differences between two individuals. The male on the right shows an emerald green coloration on his back while the individual on the left shows a more drab, grassy green coloration.

Young magnificent hummingbird in Texas, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Juvenile Male Magnificent Hummingbird Stops By for a Show

18 August 2016

Watch this clip of a juvenile male Magnificent Hummingbird flying up to the left side of the feeder before switching to the right. The scaly appearance of the breast and underparts along with flashes of the iridescent turquoise gorget and metallic purple above the eyes are characteristic of a juvenile male.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

For the past 10 years, researchers from West Texas Avian Research have been banding hummingbirds at this site and others throughout the Trans-Pecos region of Texas to study the status and distribution of hummingbirds throughout the poorly known region.

The active banding of hummingbirds continues (off camera) at this site in the Davis Mountains, and from time to time you may hear researchers working in the background. Some common species in you may hear vocalizing include Western Scrub Jays, Acorn Woodpeckers, and Canyon Wrens (among others).

Thanks to West Texas Avian Research for their enthusiasm and support for hosting the camera at this remote research site, and to cam sponsor Perky-Pet®.