Turkish government censors truth on ISIS massacre in Suruç

Demonstration in Suruç, Turkey, after Monday's massacre. Photo: EPA

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands today, 11:45:

Turkey has blocked access to Twitter. Thus, the authorities want to prevent sharing of photos and videos of the attack in the border town Suruç. Turks also have limited access to Facebook.

Earlier today, a judge ruled that websites and social media are not allowed to display these images. Once all the videos and photos would be removed, the blockade could be lifted.

On Twitter there were also calls to protest against the government. People who posted those messages thought that the government has done too little to prevent the bombing.

The attack in Suruç, near the Syrian border, was on the day before yesterday. 32 people died. There were at least 100 people wounded.

Suruç Bomber Was Known To Turkish Security Services: here.

ISIS massacre in Suruc, Turkey

This 20 July video is about the bloody attack, very probably by ISIS, in Suruc town in Turkey, near the Syrian border. Over 330 young people who wanted to help with reconstruction in Kobani in Syrian Kurdistan after the ISIS attacks on that town, were targeted by a bomb. The young people had gathered at a camp of the SGDF (Federation of Socialist Youth Organisations).

This video says about itself:

Disbelief and determination at funeral for Suruc suicide-bomb victims

21 July 2015

A mass funeral has been held in Gaziantep, southern Turkey for 27 of the victims of the suicide bombing in Suruc.

Most of those who died in the attack were students of university age who had gathered at the hall ahead of a planned trip to help rebuild the neighbouring Syrian town of Kobani.

The feeling among mourners was one of disbelief, but also determination.

“We will not give up, whatever happens,” said one woman. “We will defend peace and brotherhood.”

By the Turkish correspondent of the World Socialist Web Site:

Atrocity sparks calls for Turkish intervention in Syria

22 July 2015

An explosion on Monday outside a cultural center in the Turkish town of Suruç, on the border with Syria, killed at least 28 people and wounded more than 100. The main suspect of the suicide bomb is the Islamic State (IS), however, it has not yet taken responsibility.

The explosion occurred at around noon in front of the Amara Culture Center, as some 300 members of the Socialist Youth Association (SGDF) from İstanbul, Ankara, İzmir and Diyarbakır were issuing a press statement on the reconstruction of the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani. SGDF members were preparing to travel to Kobani to help with the reconstruction. Kobani was the scene of fierce battles between Kurdish and IS fighters, and recaptured by Kurdish forces last month.

The terrorist attack in Suruç is a clear provocation, which could trigger ethnic and sectarian clashes within Turkey, while serving as the pretext as well for a Turkish invasion of Syria.

The explosion comes several weeks after the deployment of additional Turkish troops and equipment to its border with Syria. Turkey’s leaders have said they do not plan any unilateral military incursion into Syria, but have also said they will do whatever is necessary to defend the country’s borders. Ankara fears the build-up of a Kurdish-controlled area of northern Syria by the PYD/YPG, an offshoot of the PKK, the Kurdish separatist guerrilla group in Turkey.

The massacre in Suruç is first and foremost a byproduct of the devastating policies of US imperialism, in which Ankara plays an essential role in the Middle East. As everyone knows, the AKP government is the main regional force that fomented the Syrian civil war, supported ISIS for a protracted period, and thus made it possible for the Islamist group to stage terrorist attacks inside Turkey.

ISIS had threatened the Turkish government with attacks after Ankara and Washington exchanged positive signals on the question of using İncirlik Air Base in south-central Turkey for US air strikes against IS. Whether Ankara cuts its covert support to ISIS or not, the AKP government is responsible for dragging Turkey into the bloodbath now taking place in Syria and Iraq.

Some bourgeois politicians and media commentators have already started to say that the government must respond to the terrorist attack in Suruç with the already prepared military intervention into northern Syria. President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan himself declared that now is “the time to act.”

ISIS is only one of dozens of ethnic and sectarian-based proxy organisations in Syria, created by US imperialism and its regional allies like Turkey, Qatar and Saudi Arabia, to overthrow the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

The Turkish ruling elite, itself, has admitted that there are hundreds of Islamist “sleeper cells” within Turkey, and some 5,000 Turkish militants have joined ISIS. In return, with the exception of few token arrests, the AKP government has not done anything against them. Rather, it has equated ISIS and the PKK-PYD and oriented all its fire against the latter. The so-called “Kurdish policy” of the Turkish government is an inseparable part of its proxy war in Syria, based on fomenting ethnic and sectarian divisions and hostility.

In a written statement following the attack, the Interior Ministry said, “We call on everyone to stand together and remain calm in the face of this terrorist attack which targets the unity of our country.”

Meanwhile, in a hypocritical attempt to whitewash the responsibility of his government in the terrorist attack, Erdoğan condemned those behind it. “Terror has no religion, no ethnicity, no nationality, and no country,” he said. “We always stated that an international struggle should be taken up against terrorism, we continue to express this.”

This video says about itself:

Germany: Thousands march in solidarity with Suruc victims

20 July 2015

Thousands hit the streets of Berlin, Monday, to express their solidarity with the victims of the attack in Suruc that killed dozens earlier in the day. The crowd marched wielding the flag of Rojava as well as placards critical of current Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

This video from London, England says about itself:

ISIS flag burns as London Kurds protest deadly Suruc terror attack

21 July 2015

Over 1,500 predominantly Kurdish protesters marched through the streets of North London protesting the alleged Islamic State suicide bombing of Kurdish activists on Monday in the town of Suruc, southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border. At least 30 people were killed and over 100 injured in the explosion.

There will be more on this blog on this horrible crime, and its context. It raises issues like: Why is attention and indignation in the international corporate media about this crime less than for the murders at the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, though more people have been killed and injured now? What exactly is ‘terrorism’? What is the ‘war on terror‘? Is it a real war? What makes it different from wars like World War One or the Vietnam war?

London police apologizes for associating Cuba with terrorism

Cuban flag

London police apologizes for associating Cuba with terrorism: here. See also here.

Tony Blair caused terrorism in London, abuses it for warmongering

This video from Britain says about itself:

Send him to The Hague! Tony Benn on Blair’s ‘war crimes’ (FULL INTERVIEW)

20 December 2013

Former Labour cabinet minister and Stop the War Coalition President Tony Benn talks to the host of Going Underground, Afshin Rattansi about the alleged war crimes of Tony Blair. He shares stories of intelligence goings on during his time as an MP, featured in his memoirs, including a threat to assassinate him if he ever became Prime Minister. They also discuss voter apathy and how austerity could lead to fascism on the streets of Britain.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Blair reaped a whirlwind

Wednesday 8th July 2015

THE last thing that people marking the 10th anniversary of the mass slaughter of innocent civilians in London need is a call to arms from Tony Blair.

His observation that Western countries need to have “the means of combating these people and combating them on the ground” smacks of his obsession with launching wars.

Blair says that, 10 years ago, “we faced people who had been radicalised over a period of time,” but he accepts no responsibility for involving Britain in illegal invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq and encouraging Israel to colonise Palestinian land.

He notes that there are “training camps actually in Libya not just in Syria, in Iraq and elsewhere and this threat is not going away. It will intensify in time to come.”

Would camps in Libya exist if British and French warplanes had not acted as the air force for an assortment of armed opposition groups seeking to overthrow Muammar Gadaffi?

Would Isis be in a strong position in Iraq had the US and British invading forces not destroyed the state infrastructure, including the army, leaving an assortment of weaponry available to insurgents?

Would the same death cult, together with al-Qaida-linked groups, have taken over large swathes of Syria but for Washington and London turning a blind eye to their allies Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain sending weapons and fighters to anti-government groups?

Blair counters that countries that played no role in invading Iraq have also been affected and that “radicalisation” predated that criminal act.

Both points are true, but they don’t absolve Western imperialist leaders.

Obscurantist salafist ideas have existed for centuries, not least in Saudi Arabia which played a key role in backing armed rebellion in Afghanistan even before Soviet military support for the Kabul government.

Washington was warned then that, by supplying state-of-the-art munitions to the so-called mojahedin, it was sowing a wind and would reap a whirlwind.

US politicians thought they could turn religious extremism on and off like a tap to suit themselves.

The current global situation offers conclusive proof that they were wrong.

Yesterday’s moving commemorations across Britain of July 7 2005 involved people of all faiths and none to emphasise togetherness and mutual respect.

The timely and brave response of transport workers, police, firefighters, nurses and doctors at a nearby BMA conference who all ran towards the scenes of carnage that everyone else had been told to flee provided an example of our people at their best.

The “peace iftars” in many mosques highlight that Muslims have borne the heaviest burden of the death cult upsurge, both in lives lost and victimisation by shallow politicians.

Labour London mayoral hopeful Sadiq Khan recalls that Blair called in Muslim Labour MPs after the London Tube and bus bombings to tell them that this was their responsibility.

Khan retorted correctly that this was a problem for all of us.

When grubby politicians demand that Muslim communities atone or apologise for atrocities committed by self-professed Muslims, they must be reminded that no religion sanctions mass murder of innocent civilians.

London’s multiracial, multi-faith population suffered the hurt of July 7 2005 together and commemorated it yesterday in the same united way.

As Muslim Council of Britain secretary-general Shuja Shafi says, “The best way to defy the terrorist is to increase our bonds of unity, not to single out any one group of people for blame or opprobrium.”

Life for British Muslims since 7/7 – abuse, suspicion and constant apologies, by Mehdi Hasan. The London bombings shocked us all. But in the decade since, our community has been unfairly demonised: here.

British bombs on Syria will help ISIS

This video from #SyrianGirl says about itself:

The only way to defeat ISIS is to stop US support of ISIS by proxies Turkey, Qatar, Saudi Arabia. Not by bombing the country more.

The British Cameron government wanted to start a war on the Syrian government in 2013. A war in which they would have been allies of ISIS and Al-Qaeda. The peace movement managed to stop that plan then.

Now, they have again plans to bomb Syria. Officially, against ISIS this time. But as part of a coalition which includes countries serving as ideological inspiration for ISIS cruelty; and from which money is still flowing to ISIS. And a coalition which in practice still includes Al-Qaeda.

By Paddy McGuffin in Britain:

New bid to bomb Syria

Friday 3rd July 2015

As Defence Secretary Fallon pushes for more air strikes, campaigners warn of untold misery for people in the Middle East

ANTI-WAR campaigners challenged Defence Secretary Michael Fallon yesterday following his call for more air strikes in Syria and warned that the action could fuel potential Isis recruits.

Mr Fallon argued it was “illogical” that British planes were able to hit extremists in Iraq but not bases across the border and suggested any evidence that last week’s massacre in Tunisia was planned in Syria would show that the Islamic State leadership in the country represented a direct threat to the British people.

No Mr Fallon, that horrible massacre in Tunisia was not planned in Syria. It was planned in Libya. It was planned in the ‘new’ ‘free ‘Libya; created by David Cameron and his pals Nicolas Sarkozy and Silvio Berlusconi with their ‘humanitarian’ war for oil.

When the PM obtained Commons approval for the bombing of militant positions last year, he made it clear that this was limited to Iraq.

However Mr Fallon quoted David Cameron who said in September during the debate on taking action in Iraq that there was a “strong case” for Britain to do more in Syria.

He confirmed the government would seek Commons approval before conducting air strikes there. But he added: “The exception, as the house knows, is if there was a critical British national interest at stake or the need to act to prevent humanitarian catastrophe.”

Labour strongly indicated that it would back the government’s proposal with shadow defence secretary Vernon Coaker saying that Labour stood “ready to work with the government to defeat Isis” and would “carefully consider” any proposals that the government decides to bring forward.

“We all need to be clear about what difference any action would make to our objective of defeating Isis, about the nature of any action, its objectives and indeed its legal basis.

“Any potential action must command the support of other nations in the region, including Iraq and the coalition already taking action in Syria.”

Acting Labour leader Harriet Harman also appeared to imply the party could support the proposal saying that the situation was different to that in 2013.

But a Stop the War spokesman warned against military action as it’s action that has led to more people joining Isis. He said: “The US is already bombing Syria as well as Iraq, with little success. Many argue that this bombing has helped Isis recruit. “The proposal is in response to the terrible attack in Tunisia last week, but will do nothing to stop further attacks. Support for Isis in Tunisia has grown in the past two years, largely as a result of the growth of terrorism in neighbouring Libya. That in turn dates from the British and French-led bombing of Libya in 2011 which has created a state of civil war, terrorism and misery for its people.”

Campaign Against Nuclear Disarmament general secretary Kate Hudson said that US and British military action in the Middle East and North Africa had been “ill-conceived, leading to death and destruction for innocent civilians, and shattered states — both of which were abandoned by their attackers — where terrorists including Isis have since been able to organise.

We bombed Isis into existence. We can’t bomb them out of existence.”

Tunisian mass murderers from ‘new’ Libya

This video from the USA is called Hillary Clinton: USA created Al Qaeda.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Perpetrator of massacre in Tunisia was in training camp in Libya

Today, 17:23

The man who last week staged an attack in Tunisia on a tourist beach had been earlier this year in Libya in a training camp for jihad, along with the two men who earlier in Tunis committed an attack in the Bardo Museum. That says a senior Tunisian security officer.

The Tunisian Prime Minister Habib Essid still said on Saturday that the perpetrator had not been in view of the security services and had never left Tunisia. In the attack last Friday, 39 people were killed.

The perpetrator, who himself was killed by hotel security guards, left according to the security officer in January to Libya to attend jihad training. The two men who in March in broad daylight shot dead 22 people in the Bardo Museum in Tunis were there at the same time.

Thank you so much, on behalf of the surviving families of the murdered foreign tourists and Tunisians, thank you dear NATO, dear David Cameron, dear Nicolas Sarkozy, dear Silvio Berlusconi, etc. etc. for your bloody regime change war for oil ‘bringing democracy’ to a ‘brave new’ Libya … [sarcasm off]

Benghazi, where Libya’s uprising began, now a shattered city | Washington Times: here.

The Congressional harrying of former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton over emails concerning the 2012 death of an American Ambassador and three staff members in Benghazi, Libya, has become a sort of running joke, with Republicans claiming “cover-up” and Democrats dismissing the whole matter as nothing more than election year politics. But there is indeed a story embedded in the emails, one that is deeply damning of American and French actions in the Libyan civil war, from secretly funding the revolt against Muammar Gaddafi, to the willingness to use journalism as a cover for covert action: here.

British Conservatives help ISIS

This 12 May 2015 video from Britain says about itself:

Russell Brand, Abby Martin: David Cameron: Islamophobia to Control You, Part 1.

This video is the sequel.

Since 2002, Right-wing White Terrorists have Killed More Americans Than Muslim Extremists: here.

By Seumas Milne in daily The Guardian in Britain:

By scapegoating Muslims, Cameron fuels radicalisation

Ministers foster terror with their wars. Now they attack liberties at home in the name of British values

Wednesday 24 June 2015 20.54 BST

The anti-Muslim drumbeat has become deafening across the western world. As images of atrocities by the jihadi terror group Isis multiply online, and a steady trickle of young Europeans and North Americans head to Syria and Iraq to join them, Muslim communities are under siege. Last week David Cameron accused British Muslims of “quietly condoning” the ideology that drives Isis sectarian brutality, normalising hatred of “British values”, and blaming the authorities for the “radicalisation” of those who go to fight for it.

It was too much for Sayeeda Warsi, the former Conservative party chair, who condemned the prime minister’s “misguided emphasis” on “Muslim community complicity”. He risked “further alienating” the large majority of Muslims fighting the influence of such groups, she warned. Even Charles Farr, the hawkish counter-terrorism mandarin at the Home Office, balked. Perhaps fewer than 100 Britons were currently fighting with Isis, he said, and “we risk labelling Muslim communities as somehow intrinsically extremist”.

But Cameron and his neoconservative allies are preparing the ground for the government’s next onslaught. The target will not be terrorism, but “non-violent extremism”. Next month, from nursery schools to optometrists, health services to universities, all will be legally obliged to monitor students and patients for any sign of “extremism” or “radicalisation”.

The new powers represent a level of embedded security surveillance in public life unprecedented in peacetime. We already know from the government’s Prevent programme the chilling impact of such mass spying on schools, where Muslim pupils have been reported for speaking out in favour of Palestinian rights or against the role of British troops in Afghanistan.

But the “counter-extremism” bill announced in the Queen’s Speech is about to take the anti-Muslim clampdown a whole stage further. The plans include banning orders for non-violent individuals and organisations whose politics are considered unacceptable; physical restriction orders for non-violent individuals deemed “harmful”; powers to close mosques; and vetting controls on broadcasters accused of airing extremist material. It’s censorship under any other name.

That was the view of Sajid Javid, then culture secretary, in a leaked letter to the prime minister earlier this year. But Cameron shows every sign of pressing ahead with what amounts to a full-blown assault on basic liberties. Most ludicrously, the new powers are defended in the name of “British values”, including “individual liberty” and “mutual respect and tolerance”.

But as became clear in the aftermath of the murderous Paris attack on Charlie Hebdo earlier this year, we are not all Charlie when it comes to freedom of speech. Anti-extremism powers will be used overwhelmingly against Muslims, rather than, say, non-Muslim homophobes and racists who have little interest in mutual respect and tolerance.

And they will fail, as their earlier incarnations have done, to discourage the small minority drawn to terrorism at home or jihadi campaigns abroad. Government ministers claim such violence is driven by “ideology” rather than injustice, grievance or its own policies. But, given that they refuse to speak to any significant Muslim organisation they don’t agree with or fund, perhaps it’s not surprising to find them in thrall to an ideology, neoconservatism, of their own.

Any other explanation for the terror threat would in any case implicate the government and its predecessors. In reality, it shouldn’t be so hard to understand why a small section of young alienated Muslims are attracted to fight in Syria and Iraq with Isis and other such groups. Jihadi “ideology” has been around for a long time. But there were no terror attacks in Britain before US and British forces invaded Afghanistan and Iraq, and those behind every violent attack or terror plot have cited western intervention in the Muslim world as their motivation.

Isis has a different appeal to al-Qaida. It has taken huge stretches of territory using naked terror, destroyed borders and set up a self-proclaimed caliphate. In the Middle East it presents itself as the defender of Sunnis in a convulsive sectarian war. For a few young marginalised western Muslims, such groups can offer the illusion of a fight against tyranny and a powerful sense of identity.

But add in relentless media hostility, rampant Islamophobia, state surveillance and harassment of Muslim communities, and such alienation can only spread. In the past year, we’ve had the “Trojan Horse” Birmingham schools plot that never was, the ousting of an elected Muslim mayor of Tower Hamlets by a judge – including on grounds that he had exercised “undue spiritual influence” on Muslims – and evidence of an increasing level of anti-Muslim attacks. Islamophobia now far outstrips hostility to any other religion or ethnic group.

Ministers and their media allies downplay the role of “foreign policy” in Muslim radicalisation, against all the evidence. By foreign policy, they mean multiple western invasions and occupations of Muslim states, torture and state kidnapping on a global scale, and support for dictatorships across the Arab and Muslim world. That includes Saudi Arabia, of course, which shares much of Isis’s “ideology” and practices; and Egypt, whose ex-military leader, Abdel Fatah al-Sisi, overthrew the elected president in 2013 and is soon to be welcomed to Downing Street.

Isis is itself the direct product of the US and British occupation and destruction of Iraq, and both countries back armed rebel groups fighting in Syria – as they did in Libya. So no wonder would-be jihadis get confused about who is on whose side. Western Isis volunteers are a disaster for Syria and Iraq, but so far they haven’t carried out return attacks at home.

That could of course change, not least as the government criminalises dissent, brands conservative religiosity “extremist” and, in the formulation of ministers, “quietly condones” Islamophobia. The British government has long fed terrorism with its warmaking abroad. Now it’s also fuelling it with its scapegoating of Muslims at home.