Dictator gives Egyptian islands away to Saudi Arabia


This video from the USA says about itself:

Egypt’s Alliance with Saudi Arabia Shows Signs of Stress

24 June 2017

President Sisi of Egypt’s transfer of two islands to Saudi Arabia is unprecedented and rejected by much of its population.

Saudi Arabia’s new warmongering crown prince


This video from the USA says about itself:

Saudi Arabia Bombing Yemen To Quell Demonstrations for Democracy

24 August 2016

The Saudi-led coalition is not just trying to deter Houthi leaders; they want to ensure that pro-democratic Yemeni demonstrations don’t touch the rest of the Arabian peninsula, says Bilal Zenab Ahmed of http://Souciant.com.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Hardliner becomes heir to throne in soft coup

Thursday 22nd June 2017

New crown prince has directed Riyadh’s brutal military campaign in Yemen

SAUDI ARABIA’S King Salman made his son the heir to the throne and deputy prime minister yesterday, at the expense of his nephew and counterterrorism chief.

Mohammed bin Salman — who was appointed defence minister in January 2015, months before the start of the Saudi-led war in Yemen — was named as the new crown prince.

He will retain the defence portfolio while taking on the deputy PM role.

Former crown prince Mohammed bin Nayef was stripped of the title, along with his powerful post as interior minister in charge of security.

He told his successor: “I will rest now, and God help you.”

His interior minister job went to another young prince, Abdulaziz bin Saud, whose father is the governor of Saudi Arabia’s vast Eastern province, which is home to most of the nation’s Shi’ites [and much of the oil] and borders Qatar.

Yesterday’s royal decree stated that “a majority” of senior royal members — 31 of 34 — on the shadowy Allegiance Council supported the recasting of the line of succession.

Riyadh’s Gulf Arab neighbours all welcomed the announcement, but in regional rival Iran, the national TV news called it a “soft coup.”

Mr bin Salman was little known before his appointment as defence minister at the tender age of 29.

He has ruled out dialogue with Iran, pushed for the blockade of Qatar this month and led the war in Yemen that has killed thousands of civilians and brought that country to the brink of famine.

Mr bin Salman has also supported floating part of state oil firm Aramco on the international stock markets to allow foreign part-ownership and investment.

In remarks aired on Saudi TV in May, he framed the tensions with Iran in sectarian terms, saying Tehran’s goal was “to control the Islamic world” and to spread its Shi’ite doctrine. He also vowed to take “the battle” to Iran.

Alongside Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, appointed in April 2015, Mr bin Salman appears to represent a more aggressive and interventionist Saudi attitude to the region.

Palace coup in Saudi Arabia: here.