US Republican ‘frontrunner’ Romney loses primaries


This video from the USA says about itself:

Visit http://santorumexposed.com or http://www.facebook.com/exposesantorum to see more of the crazy sh*t that Rick Santorum says.

Rick Santorum Tells Boy Not to Use Pink Bowling Ball: here.

By Patrick Martin in the USA:

Santorum wins Republican primaries in Alabama, Mississippi

14 March 2012

Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum won the Republican presidential primaries in Alabama and Mississippi Tuesday, narrowly defeating former House speaker Newt Gingrich and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, who finished second and third, respectively, in the two states. The fourth candidate in the race, Texas Congressman Ron Paul, did not campaign in either state and trailed badly.

Santorum’s margin of victory was relatively narrow—35-29-28 in Alabama, 33-31-30 in Mississippi—and under the rules of the two state Republican parties, the three leading candidates will get roughly equal shares of the 84 delegates to the Republican National Convention chosen in the states.

Nonetheless, the twin victories for Santorum stalled the campaign of frontrunner Romney, who poured millions into the two states in an effort to finish off his two major rivals. Romney had the support of nearly all Republican state officials in Mississippi and most of those in Alabama.

According to exit polls, Santorum was leading among those who rejected the theory of evolution, those who claimed to believe Obama is a Muslim (50 percent of the voters), those who thought banning abortion the most important issue, and those who said a candidate’s religion was very important to them (a measure of anti-Mormon sentiment among the evangelical Christians who made up three quarters of the electorate).

One pre-election poll found that a quarter of likely Republican primary voters in the two states believed that interracial marriages should be illegal. These voters sided more with Gingrich, who has made thinly veiled appeals to racial prejudice a part of his campaign. Last week he gave a speech devoted to “states’ rights,” the banner under with Southern segregationists fought the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

The two primaries continued the pattern of the 2012 campaign, which has seen voter turnout well below that of 2008. Barely 500,000 voted in Alabama, down more than 50,000 from four years ago. Voter participation in Mississippi was slightly up compared to 2008, but only because the primary four years ago took place after the nomination had already been decided. As a proportion of those eligible to vote, turnout in Mississippi was even lower than in Alabama.

Santorum’s victories in Mississippi and Alabama followed a much wider win in the Republican caucuses in Kansas, where a tiny turnout of barely 25,000 people delivered him nearly all of the state’s 40 delegates.

The outcome of the three contests raised the likelihood of a protracted contest for the Republican presidential nomination, possibly extending all the way to the convention in Tampa in early September—only two months before the general election.

In television interviews late Tuesday night, Gingrich rebuffed suggestions that his second-place finishes had made his campaign unviable. He said that because of new party rules establishing proportional representation and the presence of four contenders, no single candidate would be able to win an outright majority of the delegates.

In that event, he said, Romney would have failed to win the nomination and the anti-Romney majority would be compelled to come together to choose a candidate, either Santorum, himself or someone not currently seeking the nomination. …

As the campaign has continued and the Obama administration has moved further and further to the right, his Republican opponents have been compelled to adopt ever more extreme positions in order to outflank him.

Romney, in particular, has repudiated nearly all the policies he pursued as governor of Massachusetts from 2003 to 2006 in order to embrace a series of political litmus tests laid down by the ultra-right Tea Party elements.

The most recent example was his conversion on the issue of the minimum wage, which he supported in Massachusetts and even during his 2008 campaign for the Republican nomination, advocating indexing the wage to inflation. But in a television interview last week, he reversed himself, declaring, “There’s probably not a need to raise the minimum wage.”

‘Occupy Wall Street’ protesters target Romney fundraiser: here.

Bain Capital Tied to Surveillance Push in Chinese Cities. Andrew Jacobs and Penn Bullock, The New York Times News Service: “In December, a Bain-run fund in which a Romney family blind trust has holdings purchased the video surveillance division of a Chinese company that claims to be the largest supplier to the government’s Safe Cities program, a highly advanced monitoring system that allows the authorities to watch over university campuses, hospitals, mosques and movie theaters from centralized command posts”: here.

Birthers want proof that Mitt Romney was born in America: here.

Siding with Gov. Walker in union fight could cost Romney in Nov.: here.

Romney’s Top Five Assaults on Women’s Health. Annie-Rose Strasser, ThinkProgress: “Of women under 50 years old, only 30 percent support Romney, while over 60 percent back the President…. Romney’s record on women’s health is hardly strong, and women voters, especially the young voters who tend to be pro-choice and pro-contraception, are likely responding to Romney’s affront on these issues. But it hasn’t always been this way…. Romney has moved significantly to the right on almost all women’s health issues”: here.

Did the Koch Machine Put Romney Over the Top in Wisconsin? Adele Stan, AlterNet: “Mitt Romney won the Wisconsin Republican presidential primary by a mere 4-point margin over Rick Santorum … He outspent Santorum on television ads by a margin of 4-to-1 during the Wisconsin, all for a weak finish. And of Romney’s top Wisconsin endorsers, four are solid allies of the state’s muscular Koch machine, a political apparatus comprising a particularly aggressive state chapter of the Koch-founded Americans For Prosperity, as well as a handful of think tanks and associations”: here.

Is There More to Sen. Snowe’s Resignation Than Congress’s “Crumbling Center”? Danny Weil, Truthout: “Snowe is hardly a moderate. Casting the conservative senator from Maine as such exemplifies how far to the right this country has moved … Snowe’s announcement she will not seek another term in the Senate may have little to do with ‘civility’ or ‘loss of the center’ within contentious politics and more to do with the fact her husband is knee-deep in controversy over an educational for-profit college chain know as Educational Management Corporation or Wall Street ticker (EDMC)”: here.

Limbaugh, Santorum, Sex, and the Origins of the Roman Catholic Church: here.

VOTER SUPPRESSION 101: How conservatives are conspiring to disenfranchise millions of Americans: here.

United States Republican primaries in Arizona and Michigan


This video from the USA is called Rick Santorum‘s Stance on Birth Control.

By Patrick Martin in the USA:

Romney wins Republican primaries in Arizona and Michigan

29 February 2012

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney won the Republican presidential primary in Arizona easily and was projected to win the primary in Michigan narrowly, as vote counting continued late into the night Tuesday. Turnout in both states was virtually unchanged from 2008.

Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum finished second in both states. Texas Congressman Ron Paul placed third and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich placed fourth in Michigan, and the two finished in the reverse order in Arizona.

Romney won Arizona with 48 percent compared to 26 percent for Santorum. Because of the winner-take-all rules established by the state Republican Party, none of his rivals seriously contested the state and Romney won all 29 delegates at stake.

In Michigan, where delegates were awarded separately for each congressional district, the 30 delegates were split nearly evenly, since Santorum seemed likely to win seven congressional districts in the center, west and north of the state, while Romney was ahead in the seven districts in the state’s population center, the southeast.

Santorum had briefly led the polls in Michigan, the state where Romney was born and where his father was a three-term governor in the 1960s, but fell behind after a barrage of advertisements from the Romney campaign, which had a huge financial advantage.

Exit polls showed a sharp drop in support for Santorum among working women who chose to vote in the Republican primary, suggesting that his attacks on contraception and women working outside the home had backfired even among more conservative women.

With many precincts still unreported, Romney led Santorum in Michigan by 41 percent to 38 percent, barely topping his 39 percent showing in 2008 when he defeated the eventual Republican presidential nominee, John McCain.

In both states, Romney had the support of the Republican Party establishment and most office-holders. Arizona Governor Jan Brewer and the state’s senior senator, John McCain, backed him, as did Michigan Governor Rick Snyder and most of the state’s delegation in the House of Representatives. In Michigan, both the right-wing Detroit News and the pro-Obama Detroit Free Press endorsed Romney over Santorum in the primary.

The prospect of a Romney defeat in Michigan produced an outpouring of despair by Republican media pundits who saw Santorum as a likely landslide loser in the general election. There were suggestions that a Santorum victory in Michigan would produce a late entrant into the Republican contest.

The Wall Street Journal published three separate commentaries on February 24 lamenting the likelihood that Santorum’s focus on social issues like abortion, contraception and gay marriage and his hectoring and intolerant tone would alienate millions of voters, particularly women.

Romney, however, declined to make any criticism of Santorum’s ultra-right positions, either in the last campaign debate, February 22 in Arizona, or in his day-to-day campaign appearances and television interviews. Instead, he attempted to outflank Santorum from the right, branding him a Washington “insider” who supported higher federal spending.

Republican candidate Santorum attacks the First Amendment: here.

E.J. Dionne Jr., The Washington Post Writers Group: “Maybe Rick Santorum is helping Mitt Romney after all: Santorum’s wacky statements about college and snobbery, along with his upset stomach over a 52-year-old John F. Kennedy speech, are distracting attention from Romney’s extremist economic ideas”: here.

Mitt Romney and other US Republicans


This satiric video from the USA is called The Truth About Republicans by George Carlin.

By Greg Palast for The Nation:

Romney‘s Auto Bail-out Billionaires

Top funders made billions from US Treasury

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney called the federal government’s 2009 bail-out of the auto industry, “nothing more than crony capitalism, Obama style… a reward for his big donors to his campaign.” In fact, the biggest rewards – a windfall of more than two billion dollars care of US taxpayers — went to Romney’s two top contributors.

John Paulson of Paulson & Co and Paul Singer of Elliott International, known on Wall Street as “vulture” investors, have each written checks for one million dollars to Restore Our Future, the Super PAC supporting Romney’s candidacy.

Gov. Romney last week asserted that the Obama Administration’s support for General Motors was a, “payoff for the auto workers union.” However, union workers in GM’s former auto parts division, Delphi, the unit taken over by Romney’s funders, did not fare so well. The speculators eliminated every single union job from the parts factories once manned by 25,200 UAW members.

The two hedge fund operators turned a breathtaking three-thousand percent profit on a relatively negligible investment by using hardball tactics against the US Treasury and their own employees.

Under the control of the speculators, Delphi, which had 45 plants in the US and Canada, is now reduced to just four factories with only 1,500 hourly workers, none of them UAW members, despite the union agreeing to cut contract wages by two thirds.

It wasn’t supposed to be quite so bad. The Obama Administration and GM had arranged for a private equity investor to provide half a billion dollars in new capital for Delphi, but that would have cut the pay-out to Singer and Paulson. The speculators blocked the Obama-GM plan, taking the entire government bail-out hostage. Even the Wall Street Journal‘s Dealmaker column was outraged, accusing Paul Singer of treating the auto company, “like a third world country.”

But it worked. Singer and Paulson got what they demanded. Using US Treasury funds:

GM agreed to pay off $1.1 billion of Delphi’s debts, forgave $2.15 billion owed GM by Delphi (which had been spun off as an independent company) pumped $1.75 billion into Delphi operations, and took over four money-losing plants that the speculators didn’t want.

If those plants had been closed, GM factories would have shut down cold for lack of parts.

Then there was the big one: The US government agreed to take over $6.2 billion in pension benefits due Delphi workers under US labor law.

Governor Romney, while opposing the bail-out of GM, accused Obama of eliminating the pensions of 21,000 non-union employees at Delphi. In fact, it was Romney’s funders who wiped out 100% of the pensions and health care accounts of Delphi salaried retirees­­.

Paulson and Singer paid an average of about 67 cents a share for Delphi. In November, 2011, Paulson sold a chunk of his holdings for $22 a share. Paulson’s gain totals a billion and a half dollars ($1,499,499,000), and Singer gained nearly a billion ($899,751,000) — thirty-two times their investment.

One-hundred percent of this gain for the Paulson and Singer hedge funds is accounted for by taxpayer bail-out support.

But, unlike the government loans and worker concessions given to GM, the US Treasury and workers get nothing in return from Delphi.

>From GM, the US Treasury got warrants for common stock (similar to options) that have already produced billions in profit.

And Delphi? It’s doing well for Paulson and Singer. GM and Chrysler, still in business by the grace of the US Treasury, remain Delphi’s main customers, buying parts now made almost entirely in China and other cheap-labor nations.

And exactly who are Paulson and Singer?

Billionaire John Paulson became the first man in history to earn over $3 billion in a single year — not for his hedge fund, but for himself, personally. At the core of this huge payday was a 2007 scheme by which, via Goldman Sachs, he sold “insurance” on subprime mortgage loans. According to a lawsuit filed by the Securities Exchange Commission, Goldman defrauded European banks by pretending that Paulson was investing in the insurance. In fact, Paulson was, secretly, the beneficiary of the insurance, reaping billions when the mortgage market collapsed.

Goldman paid half a billion dollars in civil fines for the fraud. While the SEC states that Paulson knowingly participated in the scheme, he was not fined and denies he defrauded the banks.

Multi-billionaire Singer is known as Wall Street’s toughest “vulture” speculator. Vulture fund financial attacks on the world’s poorest nations have been effectively outlawed in much of Europe and excoriated by human rights groups, conduct Britain’s former Prime Minister Gordon Brown described as, “morally outrageous.”

With primary voting Tuesday in Michigan and Arizona, the Republican presidential campaign has effectively narrowed to two candidates, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum: here.

Romney Fails His Own “Moral Responsibility” Test, Can’t Balance His Campaign’s Budget: here.

George W. Bush Still A Drag On Rick Santorum‘s Prospects: here.

Eleven Questions for Sen. Santorum: here.

A Woman’s Womb: America’s New Sports Arena. Connie Schultz, Truthout: “I always have thought my birth control was a whole lot of nobody’s business. However, Santorum and that all-male panel of pontificates at the recent congressional hearing make clear that silence is not an option. Not if I – not if we – want subsequent generations of women to live long, healthy lives”: here.

Republican congressman caught on tape blasting GOP leadership as ‘directed by billionaires’: here.

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