Baby rhino drives away Egyptian geese


This video, from Kruger National Park in South Africa, says about itself:

1 February 2016

This video is dedicated to Roger Gower, a man who was killed this week, while protecting our precious wildlife. With all the horrible poaching of rhinos that is currently happening, we thought we would cheer everyone up with a video that will make you feel overloaded with cuteness.

Such a cute video of a tiny new-born rhino trying to chase away the [Egyptian] geese that are around him.

Video by: Simone

Merry Christmas from the Rhino Dog Squad in Africa


This video from Kenya in Africa says about itself:

Merry Christmas from the Rhino Dog Squad

18 December 2015

This Christmas, brave rangers and dogs will be in the field protecting rhinos and other endangered wildlife.

Please give generously to support the #RhinoDogSquad by donating online.

Rare Javan rhino calves, video


This video says about itself (translated):

September 11 2015

On the Indonesian island Java camera traps have made extraordinary images of three new-born calves of the Javan rhinoceros, one of the rarest animals on earth. Images: WWF.

See also here.

Stop rhino horn quackery, save rhinos


This video says about itself:

30 August 2015

Anneka Svenska blows open the MYTH surrounding RHINO HORN and WHY IT does NOT CURE AILMENTS!

Also why poaching Rhino Horn is contributing to the EXTINCTION of the world’s RHINOS including the SUMATRAN RHINO from MALAYSIA in 2015.

USA: Iowa taxidermist convicted of selling endangered black rhino horns to known trafficker sentenced to 2 years in jail: here.

Baby rhino saved from snare in Malawi


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Black Rhino Cow Tries To Revive Dead Calf

8 February 2013

Black Rhino grieves over her dead calf and tries to revive it after it was struck by lightning.

From LILONGWE NEWS blog in Malawi:

BABY RHINO DE-SNARED

14 August 2015

Today we received this update from our partners at the Lilongwe Wildlife Trust in Malawi.

A poor little [black] rhino calf was caught in a snare in Liwonde National Park in Malawi, but luckily Lilongwe Wildlife Trust’s wildlife emergency response unit (WERU) were on hand to help.

Kate Moore tells us more about the operation:

After four days of tracking the team finally had the opportunity to dart the mother, Namatunu, allowing the team to sedate the calf, believed to be just a few months old, and work on removing the snare. The snare had become embedded around the baby’s foot.

WERU’s lead vet Amanda Salb cleaned up the wound, which was very deep, and gave antibiotics to avoid infection. The team also found out that the calf was a ‘she’…nice to know! A VHF transmitter was then attached to her tail so that she can be monitored to make sure the injury heals properly and she experiences no further problems as a result. Once awake, both mother and daughter were seen leaving the area together and have been spotted doing well since then.

Wire snares are set by poachers to catch buffalo and antelope so they can sell the meat, but other wildlife such as elephant, rhino and lions are regularly caught accidentally as snaring is indiscriminate in their action.

The operation took a lot of teamwork from Lilongwe Wildlife Trust, Department of National Parks and Wildlife, CAWS, Cluny Wildlife Trust and African Parks, as well as the Born Free sponsored vehicle, so congratulations to everyone involved!

Orphan baby rhino rescued in South Africa


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Two rhino bulls chased around a pride of six hungry lions at the waterhole Renosterpan in Kruger park, great fun to watch. Square-lipped rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). Happened in 2009. Rhinos are being poached at an alarming rate; please help to protect these amazing animals by donating to the wildlife funds fighting rhino poaching.

From daily The Independent in South Africa:

Orphan baby rhino rescued

July 27 2015 at 08:33am

By Leanne Jansen

Durban – A baby rhino that lost its mother to poachers in the Kruger National Park has been rescued by rangers, and is settling into its new home at the Care for Wild Africa rehabilitation centre in Mpumalanga.

The rhino, not older than two months, wandered on to a road and cosied up to a tourist’s car. The tourists alerted park staff, and rangers Don English and Craig Williams helped to have it tranquillised, and flown to the rehabilitation centre.

But that was not the end of the little creature’s ordeal – it stopped breathing and had to be resuscitated along the way.

By Friday afternoon, it had recovered and was doing well, said park spokesperson William Mabasa.

Sadly, the carcass of its mother was found on Saturday, its horns removed.

Mabasa extended his gratitude to the tourists who had told rangers about the orphaned rhino and also urged the public to play an active role in conservation efforts.

“These people (poachers) live in our communities. Somebody somewhere knows who they are and where they are,” Mabasa said.

Last month the Kruger Park, which is South Africa’s largest rhino reserve, announced that it was installing boom gates along three popular tourist roads to control people entering the new Intensive Protection Zone for rhinos after nightfall.

The booms are manned by armed rangers from sunset to sunrise every day.

As part of a long-term plan, fencing will also be improved on the western and eastern borders of the park.

Earlier this year The Mercury reported on how poaching had soared to a record level of 1 215 killings countrywide last year, mostly in the Kruger Park, where the poaching rate has climbed every year since 2008.

Care for Wild Africa is home to infant, injured and orphaned animals.

Its animal hospital tends to the animals until they can be rehabilitated into the wild, and the centre welcomes volunteers to help care for distressed creatures.

Genet ‘cat’ rides black rhino, video


This video says about itself:

World-first: A genet rides a black rhino

21 July 2015

This amazing never-before-seen footage captured by Wildlife ACT reveals a genet riding on a critically endangered black rhino.

In 2014, this genet, nicknamed Genet Jackson, was photographed hitch-hiking on a buffalo as well as a white rhino. Now, it has been filmed riding on a critically endangered black rhino.

Wildlife ACT assists Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife with monitoring endangered species and captured this groundbreaking footage in the process.

Rhino Africa donated their awesome multimedia team’s time to put this video together.

See also here.

Genets are often called ‘genet cats’, but are actually in the civet family.

For those interested in the mechanics of the proposed RAPID rhino-cam to photo rhino poachers, see this paper.