Orphan baby rhino rescued in South Africa


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Two rhino bulls chased around a pride of six hungry lions at the waterhole Renosterpan in Kruger park, great fun to watch. Square-lipped rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). Happened in 2009. Rhinos are being poached at an alarming rate; please help to protect these amazing animals by donating to the wildlife funds fighting rhino poaching.

From daily The Independent in South Africa:

Orphan baby rhino rescued

July 27 2015 at 08:33am

By Leanne Jansen

Durban – A baby rhino that lost its mother to poachers in the Kruger National Park has been rescued by rangers, and is settling into its new home at the Care for Wild Africa rehabilitation centre in Mpumalanga.

The rhino, not older than two months, wandered on to a road and cosied up to a tourist’s car. The tourists alerted park staff, and rangers Don English and Craig Williams helped to have it tranquillised, and flown to the rehabilitation centre.

But that was not the end of the little creature’s ordeal – it stopped breathing and had to be resuscitated along the way.

By Friday afternoon, it had recovered and was doing well, said park spokesperson William Mabasa.

Sadly, the carcass of its mother was found on Saturday, its horns removed.

Mabasa extended his gratitude to the tourists who had told rangers about the orphaned rhino and also urged the public to play an active role in conservation efforts.

“These people (poachers) live in our communities. Somebody somewhere knows who they are and where they are,” Mabasa said.

Last month the Kruger Park, which is South Africa’s largest rhino reserve, announced that it was installing boom gates along three popular tourist roads to control people entering the new Intensive Protection Zone for rhinos after nightfall.

The booms are manned by armed rangers from sunset to sunrise every day.

As part of a long-term plan, fencing will also be improved on the western and eastern borders of the park.

Earlier this year The Mercury reported on how poaching had soared to a record level of 1 215 killings countrywide last year, mostly in the Kruger Park, where the poaching rate has climbed every year since 2008.

Care for Wild Africa is home to infant, injured and orphaned animals.

Its animal hospital tends to the animals until they can be rehabilitated into the wild, and the centre welcomes volunteers to help care for distressed creatures.

Genet ‘cat’ rides black rhino, video


This video says about itself:

World-first: A genet rides a black rhino

21 July 2015

This amazing never-before-seen footage captured by Wildlife ACT reveals a genet riding on a critically endangered black rhino.

In 2014, this genet, nicknamed Genet Jackson, was photographed hitch-hiking on a buffalo as well as a white rhino. Now, it has been filmed riding on a critically endangered black rhino.

Wildlife ACT assists Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife with monitoring endangered species and captured this groundbreaking footage in the process.

Rhino Africa donated their awesome multimedia team’s time to put this video together.

See also here.

Genets are often called ‘genet cats’, but are actually in the civet family.

For those interested in the mechanics of the proposed RAPID rhino-cam to photo rhino poachers, see this paper.

Good rhino news from Nepal


This video is called Rhino Attack (Chitwan National Park Nepal 2010).

From Wildlife Extra:

Nepal rhino population increases by more than 100

Nepal’s rhino population in the Terai Arc Landscape has increased 21 per cent over the last fours according to figures released by the Nepali Government.

There are now 645 rhinos there, compared to the 2011 estimate of 534, and numbers are the highest they’ve been since the early 1950s.

The increase in rhino numbers also comes just days after Nepal marked yet another 365-day period without a single rhino being poached – the third time in five years they’ve achieved this zero-poaching feat.

The rhino count was conducted from 11 April–2 May in Chitwan National Park, Parsa Wildlife Reserve, Bardia National Park, Shuklaphanta Wildlife Reserve and their buffer zones in the Terai Arc Landscape.

It was led by the government’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation and Department of Forests, in collaboration with WWF Nepal and National Trust for Nature Conservation.

The count was done using a sweep operation with 267 official observers, including wildlife biologists, national park technical staff, conservationists, local people and the army – some riding on trained elephants to help traverse the difficult landscape.

In order to estimate numbers, the observers gather unique identifying information from individual rhinos they see, so they can avoid double-counting. This can include the shape and size of horns, folds in the skin on the neck and rump, and other identifying characteristics or marks, for instance on the ears or around the body.

The news come at a difficult time for the country, as it comes to terms with the devastating earthquake that struck the nation on 25 April. WWF colleagues in Nepal have been focusing their time and resources on supporting relief efforts and helping affected communities in the regions where they work.

Baby woolly rhino discovered, first time ever


This video says about itself:

FIRST BABY WOOLLY RHINO FROM MORE THAN 10,000 YEARS [OLD]

FEBRUARY 25, 2015

Siberia: For the first time the remains of a baby woolly rhinoceros were discovered in the permafrost of Siberia.

The extinct woolly rhinoceros that has been called “Sasha” [is] at least 10,000 years old according to the experts and thanks to the ice he still has his hair and [people are] hoping to extract DNA.

The remains of the rhinoceros were found by a hunter beside a stream, in the largest and coldest region of Russia, the Republic of Sakha, also known as Yakutia, in September.

See also here. And here. And here.

Playing drums for rhinos


This music video says about itself:

Rhino Revolution Desert Drumming

On the 9th of January [2015], Rhino Revolution Dubai held their third fund-raising event in order to raise funds to contribute towards the work done by Rhino Revolution in South Africa to aid the conservation efforts regarding the rhinos.

White rhino, survivor of poacher violence, gets baby


This video from South Africa says about itself:

4 November 2013

On the 2nd of March 2012, 3 rhinos were poached at Kariega Game Reserve — 1 passed away during the course of the night, Themba passed away twenty four days later and Thandi survived. 16 Months later I went to see Thandi and film her progress for my upcoming film: The Heroes of the Rhino War.

From Wildlife Extra:

Baby White Rhino born to mother that survived horrific poaching attack

Kariega Game Reserve in South Africa announced the birth this week of a baby White Rhino to a mother that had survived a terrible poaching attack that left her without her horn.

Thandi the rhino, whose story was reported on Wildlife Extra, gave birth to her calf in the early morning, witnessed by two Kariega rangers.

Shortly afterwards wildlife vet Dr William Fowlds observed the mother and her calf from a distance and confirmed that both looked well.

Thandi and two male rhinos were discovered in 2012 with their horns brutally removed by machete. They had been tranquillised and left to bleed to death.

The two males did not survive but Thandi endured numerous operations over two years, including pioneering skin graft surgery under the care of Dr Fowlds.

“I am sure that the whole rhino caring community will share in the joy of this amazing birth,” says Fowlds.

“Thandi’s story has always been an incredible testimony of the will to survive against all odds. She represents so much of what her species faces under the current poaching crisis.”

Blood tests revealed that Thandi was pregnant in December 2013. The veterinary team estimated that she could give birth anytime from December 2014. The gestation period of a white rhino is between 15 and 16 months.

All those who had been involved in Thandi’s dramatic story of survival had been waiting anxiously for the past month.

“Her survival has already given us inspiration but the birth of her calf brings a new dimension of hope to the crisis,” says Dr Fowlds, “showing us that a future generation of life is possible if we put our minds and hearts to it.”

South Africa has the largest population of rhinos in the world. However, figures compiled by the South African Department of Environmental Affairs show a dramatic escalation in the number of rhinos being poached.

During 2014, a staggering 1116 rhinos were killed. Over the past five years 3569 rhinos have died at the hands of poachers.

For the safety of Thandi and her calf, the area is off-limits to all visitors. It is important that both rhinos be left undisturbed to ensure that the calf has the best chance of survival.

To read more of Thandi’s story click here.