Young white rhinoceros sounds


This 2016 video is called White Rhino Vs Black Rhino In Rare Face-Off. The white rhino is the biggest one.

From PLOS:

Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct, context-dependent calls

Small sample of calves also suggests call development might be innate

March 7, 2018

Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct calls in differing behavioral contexts, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sabrina Linn and Marina Scheumann from the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover and Serengeti-Park Hodenhagen, Germany, and colleagues.

Describing species’ vocal repertoires can provide insights into how they communicate. Little is known about how young Southern white rhinos vocalize, and how their calls compare to those of adult rhinos. The authors of the present study characterized vocalizations in a small sample of rhino calves, aged between one month and four years old, at three zoos in Germany. They used audio and video to record the calls of seven calves reared by their mothers as well as one hand-reared calf.

The researchers found that the calves produced four distinct call types: “Whine”, “Snort”, “Threat”, and “Pant”. The call rate of Whines, which appeared to indicate an intention to suckle, decreased with age. Snort, Threat and Pant calls were used in differing social interactions with the mother, other rhinos and zookeepers, and have previously been described in adult rhinos. The hand-reared calf produced all four call types in similar behavioral contexts to the mother-reared calves, which might indicate that the calls have a strong innate component rather than being learnt from mother rhinos.

These observations were drawn from a sample of just eight young rhinos in captivity, and might not generalize to calves in the wild. Nonetheless, the authors state that their findings provide the first evidence that young white rhinos may produce specific context-dependent call types. They note that the semi-social lifestyle of white rhinos, where juveniles remain close to their mothers for several years, might lead to increased vocal communication compared to other solitary rhino species.

“Our study provides first systematic data on vocal communication of infant and juvenile white rhinoceros and first evidence that there is a strong innate component to the development of vocal usage and production in white rhinoceros”, says Sabrina Linn.

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Cheetahs versus rhino, video


This video from Africa says about itself:

Curious Cheetah cubs take on a Rhino – Natural World: Cheetahs Fast Track To Freedom – BBC Earth

24 January 2018

This Rhino is not having any of these curious Cheetah cubs nonsense.

The world’s fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah’s extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal’s inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture during movement in most vertebrates: here.

Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill: here.

Woolly rhinos, why extinct?


This 2013 video is called The End of the Woolly Rhino – Ice Age Giants – Episode 3 Preview – BBC.

From ScienceDaily:

Woolly rhino neck ribs provide clues about their decline and eventual extinction

Fossils point to rare condition in the extinct species, possibly caused by inbreeding and harsh conditions during pregnancy. Monitoring vertebrae in modern rhinos could indicate the level of extinction risk

August 29, 2017

Summary: A study reports on the incidence of abnormal cervical (neck) vertebrae in woolly rhinos, which strongly suggests a vulnerable condition in the species. Given the considerable birth defects that are associated with this condition, the researchers argue it is very possible that developmental abnormalities contributed towards the eventual extinction of these late Pleistocene rhinos.

Researchers from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden examined woolly rhino and modern rhino neck vertebrae from several European and American museum collections and noticed that the remains of woolly rhinos from the North Sea often possess a ‘cervical’ (neck) rib — in contrast to modern rhinos.

The study, published in the open access journal PeerJ today, reports on the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebrae in woolly rhinos, which strongly suggests a vulnerable condition in the species. Given the considerable birth defects that are associated with this condition, the researchers argue it is very possible that developmental abnormalities contributed towards the eventual extinction of these late Pleistocene rhinos.

In modern animals, the presence of a ‘cervical rib’ (a rib attached to a cervical vertebra) is an unusual event, and is cause for further investigation. Though the rib itself is relatively harmless, this condition is often associated with inbreeding and adverse environmental conditions during pregnancy.

Frietson Galis, one of the authors of the peer-reviewed study, found a remarkably high percentage of these neck ribs in the woolly mammoth, published in a previous study.

“This aroused our curiosity to also check the woolly rhino, a species that, like the woolly mammoth lived during the late Pleistocene and similarly died out,” said Alexandra van der Geer, one of the authors of the study. “The woolly rhino bones were all dredged from the North Sea and river deltas in the Netherlands. We knew these were just about the last rhinos living there, so we suspected something could be wrong here as well. Our work now shows that there was indeed a problem in the woolly rhino population.”

The absence of cervical ribs in the modern sample is by no means evidence that rhino populations today are healthy. Museum collections are based on rhino specimens that were collected at least five decades ago. Rhinoceros numbers are dwindling extremely fast, especially the last two decades, resulting in near extinction for some species and the total extinction of the western black rhinoceros.

“Our study suggests that monitoring the health of the vertebrae in rhinos has the potential to timely detect developmental errors that indicate the level of extinction risk,” said Frietson Galis.

African rhinos in love, video


This video says about itself:

First Time Rhino Affection Caught On Film – Africa – BBC Earth

14 August 2017

Whilst filming at night the team witness rhinos showing affection for the first time!

World Wildlife Ranger Day in Kenya


This video from Kenya says about itself:

5 September 2016

On World Ranger Day, we hear from the persons at the front-line to protect our rhinos from the threat of poaching.

This video from Kenya says about itself:

5 September 2016

A tribute to the brave men and women on Ol Pejeta who risk it all to protect our wildlife.

Rhino charges car in South Africa


This video from South Africa says about itself:

22 June 2016

Watch this moment a Black Rhino decides to charge a group of photographers!!

The video really shows just how fast and unpredictable animals can be and we should always be ready for anything when watching these magnificent animals.

No location given due to rhino poaching.

Video by: Sam and Andrew

Read full story here.