Baby woolly rhino discovered, first time ever


This video says about itself:

FIRST BABY WOOLLY RHINO FROM MORE THAN 10,000 YEARS [OLD]

FEBRUARY 25, 2015

Siberia: For the first time the remains of a baby woolly rhinoceros were discovered in the permafrost of Siberia.

The extinct woolly rhinoceros that has been called “Sasha” [is] at least 10,000 years old according to the experts and thanks to the ice he still has his hair and [people are] hoping to extract DNA.

The remains of the rhinoceros were found by a hunter beside a stream, in the largest and coldest region of Russia, the Republic of Sakha, also known as Yakutia, in September.

See also here. And here. And here.

Playing drums for rhinos


This music video says about itself:

Rhino Revolution Desert Drumming

On the 9th of January [2015], Rhino Revolution Dubai held their third fund-raising event in order to raise funds to contribute towards the work done by Rhino Revolution in South Africa to aid the conservation efforts regarding the rhinos.

White rhino, survivor of poacher violence, gets baby


This video from South Africa says about itself:

4 November 2013

On the 2nd of March 2012, 3 rhinos were poached at Kariega Game Reserve — 1 passed away during the course of the night, Themba passed away twenty four days later and Thandi survived. 16 Months later I went to see Thandi and film her progress for my upcoming film: The Heroes of the Rhino War.

From Wildlife Extra:

Baby White Rhino born to mother that survived horrific poaching attack

Kariega Game Reserve in South Africa announced the birth this week of a baby White Rhino to a mother that had survived a terrible poaching attack that left her without her horn.

Thandi the rhino, whose story was reported on Wildlife Extra, gave birth to her calf in the early morning, witnessed by two Kariega rangers.

Shortly afterwards wildlife vet Dr William Fowlds observed the mother and her calf from a distance and confirmed that both looked well.

Thandi and two male rhinos were discovered in 2012 with their horns brutally removed by machete. They had been tranquillised and left to bleed to death.

The two males did not survive but Thandi endured numerous operations over two years, including pioneering skin graft surgery under the care of Dr Fowlds.

“I am sure that the whole rhino caring community will share in the joy of this amazing birth,” says Fowlds.

“Thandi’s story has always been an incredible testimony of the will to survive against all odds. She represents so much of what her species faces under the current poaching crisis.”

Blood tests revealed that Thandi was pregnant in December 2013. The veterinary team estimated that she could give birth anytime from December 2014. The gestation period of a white rhino is between 15 and 16 months.

All those who had been involved in Thandi’s dramatic story of survival had been waiting anxiously for the past month.

“Her survival has already given us inspiration but the birth of her calf brings a new dimension of hope to the crisis,” says Dr Fowlds, “showing us that a future generation of life is possible if we put our minds and hearts to it.”

South Africa has the largest population of rhinos in the world. However, figures compiled by the South African Department of Environmental Affairs show a dramatic escalation in the number of rhinos being poached.

During 2014, a staggering 1116 rhinos were killed. Over the past five years 3569 rhinos have died at the hands of poachers.

For the safety of Thandi and her calf, the area is off-limits to all visitors. It is important that both rhinos be left undisturbed to ensure that the calf has the best chance of survival.

To read more of Thandi’s story click here.

Save a rhino, clip your fingernails


In this video, Marjo Hoedemaker (founder of the Marjo Hoedemaker Elephant Foundation) from the Netherlands speaks in Amersfoort zoo.

He says that in Vietnam and other countries, some people believe that rhino horn can cure cancer. This leads to poachers killing rhinos.

This quackery is nonsense. Rhino horn is the same stuff as human fingernails and toenails: keratin.

Marjo Hoedemaker proposes that people bring their clipped fingernails to Amersfoort zoo, starting on 1 December. A bin to collect the nails will then be next to the zoo’s rhino enclosure. As soon as Marjo will have five kilogram of keratin, he intends to bring it to the embassy of Vietnam in the Netherlands. The embassy may then send it to believers in Vietnam in the healing powers of rhino horn; thus saving rhino’s lives.

A pedicurist and other people have already said they will help.