How do polar bears stay warm?


This 25 February 2019 video says about itself:

How does a polar bear stay warm? | Natural History Museum

There is more to polar bear fur than meets the eye. Mammals Curator Roberto Portela Miguez explains.

For engineers, polar bear hair is a dream template for synthetic materials that might lock in heat just as well as the natural version. Now, materials scientists have developed such an insulator, reproducing the structure of individual polar bear hairs while scaling toward a material composed of many hairs for real-world applications in the architecture and aerospace sectors: here.

Polar bear and her cubs, video


This 22 February 2019 video says about itself:

A Chance Encounter With a Polar Bear and Her Two Cubs

In 2013, a wildlife cameraman from Norway, Asgeir Helgestad, met a polar bear mom whom he names Frost. Over the next few years, their paths would cross again.

Polar bears on videos


This 24 December 2017 video is called Polar bears play football with spy cam – Polar Bear Spy On The Ice – BBC Earth.

This 22 December 2017 video is called Polar bear destroys spy cam – Polar Bear Spy On The Ice – BBC Earth.

This 20 December 2017 video says about itself:

Polar bear helps film her own cub! – Polar Bear Spy On The Ice – BBC Earth

This polar bear cub‘s first steps outside are captured with the help of his own mother.

This 17 December 2017 video says about itself:

Polar Bear Rescues Our Blizzard Spy Camera – Polar Bear Spy On The Ice – BBC Earth

These two courting polar bears come to the rescue of one stranded spy cam.

Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation due to retreating sea ice, at least not right now. Off the western coast of Alaska, the Chukchi Sea is rich in marine life, but the number of polar bears in the area had never been counted. The first formal study of this population suggests that it’s been healthy and relatively abundant in recent years, numbering about 3,000 animals: here.

Using a new approach to measure chemical contaminants in polar bears, scientists found a large variety of new chlorinated and fluorinated substances, including many new polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites. Worryingly, these previously unrecognized contaminants have not declined in the past decades, and many long-chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonic acids have been increasing over time, says the study: here.

Hundreds of polar bears eat dead whale


This video about Arctic Siberia says about itself:

Hundreds of Polar Bears Gather to Feast on Whale Carcass

29 September 2017

According to a Wrangel Island news release, at least 230 polar bears gathered on Wrangel Island to gorge on a dead bowhead whale, which washed ashore Sept. 19.

From the Heritage Expeditions blog:

SHO: An unbelievable experience at Wrangel Island

19 September, 2017

I simply don’t know where or how to start this blog .. today has been one of those days I or anybody else with me will never ever forget. You had to live it to believe it, even now there are people pinching themselves to make sure it really happened, but I get ahead of myself.

The day started at 0530 with an early breakfast. We were anchored near Pitchy Bazar on the western coast of Wrangel Island. The Island was coated with a fresh coating of snow, a huge contrast to yesterday’s blue sky and warm weather at the Clark River. The early morning lighting that accompanied the sunrise was surreal. There were several options, ranging from the very easy to the more extreme.

I was on beach patrol with some folk on the easier walk when a young bear wandered our way. He had attitude and he was definitely interested in us. We persuaded him to move on and he lay down about 50 metres away in the snow and watched us. It was a close but incredibly fascinating encounter. Little did we know there were even more incredible things to come. What we saw (and experienced) next will rewrite expedition travel experiences. We were cruising down the coast and saw a “herd” or “convention “ of Polar Bears on/near the beach. There was a dead bowhead whale and we counted over 150 Polar Bears (of all ages, sexes and sizes) that were either feeding or had been feeding on it in the immediate vicinity of the whale. We launched the zodiacs for a closer look and that is the memory we will all carry with us … there are no words to describe it. I share one photo in the hope that it will portray something of our experience.

We leave Wrangel Island tonight on the last leg of this journey.

Rodney Russ – Expedition Leader, Owner and Founder

I had years ago the privilege of being on an expedition with Rodney Russ. Not to the Arctic; to New Zealand subantarctic islands like Campbell island.

The video shows the dead whale had attracted glaucous gulls as well.