Polar bear cubs video


This video says about itself:

29 December 2016

After a long winter in their den, a polar bear mother and her cubs emerge at the first signs of spring. It’s a magical moment when the youngins experience the world for the first time–and photographers are there to capture it.

Female polar bear video


This video from Canada says about itself:

A Fertile Polar Bear‘s Hard Journey From Mating to Motherhood

9 December 2016

After mating takes place, a female polar bear will prepare for her impending pregnancy by eating voraciously. In all, she will pack on more than 400 pounds, to sustain her during winter.

Polar bear videos


This video from Canada says about itself:

A Beloved Alpha Polar Bear Near the End of His Life

2 December 2016

Saint Pete, as he’s known by locals in nearby Churchill, Manitoba, is an elderly polar bear who’s been visiting the town for decades. Possibly 25 years or older, Pete is now deteriorating physically but continues to hunt for food.

This video from Canada says about itself:

2 December 2016

For Erin Greene, walking up to a polar bear requires even more courage than most of us can imagine. After all, it’s been just a year since she survived a near-fatal attack by one.

This video from Canada says about itself:

2 December 2016

A car horn outside Churchill, Manitoba, causes a curious polar bear mom and her cub to scurry in opposite directions. They find themselves farther apart than they’ve ever been before.

Polar bear and her cub video


This video from Canada says about itself:

A Lucky Break for a Starving Polar Bear Mom and Her Cub

24 November 2016

Near Churchill, Manitoba, a polar bear mom and her cub stumble across a fish carcass washed up on the shore. After a long migration across the wilderness with very little food, this feels like a feast.

Polar bears in Svalbard report


This 2015 video is called Polar Bears / Documentary (English/HD).

From Polar Bears International:

A Challenging Ice Year in Svalbard?

Monday, February 22, 2016 – 11:29

Contributor: Andrew Derocher

The winter of 2015/16 has been a wild one for the Arctic. January was warm beyond belief across the Arctic, with sea ice tracking at record low levels. Svalbard’s polar bears, in particular, were challenged by the virtual absence of sea ice anywhere near the cluster of islands until late December.

When I worked in Svalbard with the Barents Sea Population, we were based on Hopen Island in the southeast corner of the archipelago. At times, up to 40 female polar bears denned there, but it was clear that they were sensitive to sea ice conditions. If the ice didn’t arrive at the island by the first week of December, females couldn’t reach the area in time to den and had to go elsewhere.

While Hopen Island lies at the southern range of the denning habitat in Svalbard, 2015 presented new challenges to bears throughout the Barents Sea population. Sea ice was very late arriving at Kong Karls Land, which is a major and critically important denning area for the population. Kong Karls Land is what I consider one of the three jewels of polar bear denning. Along with the Churchill denning area in Canada and Wrangel Island in Russia, these three areas have unusually high densities of denning females.

Kong Karls Land can have 80 dens a year in a rather small area. Bogen Valley on Kongsøya (Kings Island) used to be like a polar bear condominium complex: Females often denned a minute’s walk from their neighbor. Some females, probably a bit bored after months in a den, would move their cubs to other dens if the former resident had already taken her cubs out to the ice.

What happened to denning in 2015/16 in Svalbard won’t be known until the Norwegian field crew reports back. It’s a worrisome time. Sea ice didn’t arrive until December in much of the archipelago. The changes in Svalbard have come much faster than expected.

Many of the areas where I studied bears from 1996-2002 are no longer polar bear habitat: They don’t have any sea ice now. While the recent COP21 agreement in Paris is a positive step forward, the challenges for polar bears remain as they were. We all have a role to play and the Paris Agreement is a promising start, but we need additional leadership and a fast transition to a low-carbon future to address the challenges ahead.

Polar bears and research in Canadian Arctic


This 2015 video is called Polar Bears / Documentary (English/HD).

From the Wildlife Conservation Society:

Going to Need a Tougher Buoy

January 5, 2016

The time a polar bear temporarily sunk important research equipment

The top of the world is warming at almost twice the rate of the rest of the planet and scientists there are grappling with what that means for local wildlife.

For instance, as the ice retreats and shipping in the area increases, how will it impact resident marine mammals?

Answering such a question in the far north comes with unique challenges, though.

Our Arctic Beringia Program faced one such obstacle last year. As Dr. Stephen Insley detailed on WCS Canada’s blog, the team had placed a buoy in Sachs Harbor, in the western Canadian Arctic, to record underwater noise.

This would give a better picture of what the local whales and seals were up to and help the team better understand how the animals might be impacted by increased human activity.

At some point, before Insley and the team could retrieve the data they had recorded though, the buoy disappeared underwater.

Suspicion fell on polar bears.

The disappearance coincided with a sighting on the outskirts of the nearby town. The local safety officer had chased two bears out of the area and one was seen swimming off in the direction of the buoy.

Eventually, after hours of dredging the water to no avail, Insley and a local colleague (who also happened to be said safety officer) struck research gold—they hooked onto the rope that was attached to the buoy and pulled it up.

On it, they had their smoking gun: water poured out of the busted float from a pair of teeth-sized holes, which were separated by roughly the width of a polar bear‘s jaw.