Pinochet torturers sentenced in Chile


This Spanish language 15 December 2016 video is about a commemoration in Chile of the kidnapping, disappearance, torture and murder of five months pregnant Reinalda del Carmen Pereira Plaza by the secret police of dictator Pinochet.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain today:

Ex-cops jailed for ‘disappearance

CHILE: A judge sentenced 35 former agents of General Augusto Pinochet’s secret police on Wednesday for the 1976 kidnapping and torture of a pregnant Communist Party member who was never seen again.

Judge Miguel Vazquez sentenced Pedro Espinoza, Juan Hernan Morales and Ricardo Victor Lawrence to 10 years in prison. The 32 others received seven-year jail terms for their part in the crime or four years as accessories.

Five-month-pregnant medical technician Reinalda Pereira, who aided dissidents resisting the dictatorship, was kidnapped on December 15 1976.

See also here.

Photo of Reinalda del Carmen Pereira Plaza

This photo commemorates Reinalda del Carmen Pereira Plaza.

Chilean Pinochet secret policemen convicted for murders


This 2013 Chilean video is about the Pinochet dictatorship murderer Major Alvaro Corbalan Castilla, now convicted.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Chile: 33 Pinochet agents jailed for communist deaths

Friday 24th March 2017

CHILE’S Supreme Court jailed 33 intelligence agents of the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship on Wednesday for the 1987 murder of five communist resistance fighters.

In the longest sentences handed down in a human rights case, former National Information Centre chief General Hugo Salas Wenzel and Major Alvaro Corbalan Castilla both received 15 years.

They were already serving time for other crimes.

Another 21 were sentenced to 10 years and the rest to a minimum of five years.

The five victims were members of the Manuel Rodriguez Patriotic Front, the military wing of the Communist Party.

They were abducted in revenge for the Front’s kidnapping of an army officer in 1987 and thrown into the sea from a helicopter.

The families of Julian Pena Maltes, Alejandro Pinochet Arenas, Manuel Sepulveda Sanchez, Gonzalo Fuenzalida Navarrete and Julio Munoz Otarola will also receive compensation equivalent to £460,000.

Colonia Dignidad, Pinochet’s nazi cult torture camp, on film


This video says about itself:

Emma Watson and the stars of Colonia talk the film’s historical background

15 April 2016

In theaters and on iTunes now.

Emma Watson, Daniel Brühl, Michael Nvyquist, and director Florian Gallenberger talk the history of Colonia Dignidad, the real Chilean Nazi camp the film is based upon.

See it in theaters: here.

A young woman’s (Emma Watson) desperate search for her abducted boyfriend (Daniel Brühl) draws her into the infamous Colonia Dignidad, an ex-Nazi cult from which no one has ever escaped.

Starring: Emma Watson, Daniel Bruhl, Michael Nvyquist.

Directed by Academy Award winner Florian Gallenberger.

By David Walsh in the USA:

Colonia: Under Pinochet, a disposal center for enemies of the state

16 April 2016

Directed by Florian Gallenberger; co-written by Gallenberger and Torsten Wenzel

The article is based on coverage of the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival.

German director Florian Gallenberger’s political thriller Colonia opens this weekend in the US. This is a disturbing film that deserves an audience.

Colonia takes place during and after the US-backed Chilean military coup in September 1973. Lufthansa flight attendant Lena (Emma Watson) is in Santiago to visit her boyfriend, Daniel (Daniel Brühl), a militant supporter of Salvador Allende’s Popular Unity government. When Allende is overthrown, General Augusto Pinochet’s forces round up thousands of people. Daniel and Lena, who are caught taking photos of the brutal sweep, are among those picked up.

In the national stadium filled with political opponents of the dictatorship (40,000 people were held there), Daniel is identified by a hooded informer as a poster-maker for the Allende camp. While Lena is released, Daniel is taken to a compound in the south of the country, called Colonia Dignidad (“Colony of Dignity”). It is home to an evangelical cult run by psychopath, pedophile and pro-fascist Paul Schäfer (Michael Nyqvist), which uses the cult followers as slave labor in the production of poison gas and weapons for the Pinochet regime. The compound also serves as a disposal center for enemies of the state.

Colonia’s underground tunnels and chambers are used to interrogate and torture dissidents like Daniel, who is brutalized and then handed over to Schäfer. Pretending to be brain-damaged, Daniel is under less scrutiny and therefore able to figure out how to escape. Unbeknownst to him, Lena has traveled to Colonia and joined the cult in order to rescue him. For some 130 days, Daniel and Lena, who finally meet up, must endure the tyranny and perversions of Schäfer. Even if an escape is possible from the electric fenced-in, dog-guarded Colonia, there are vested interests, from Pinochet to the Germany embassy, determined to prevent Schäfer’s hellhole from being exposed.

A fictionalized version of actual events, Colonia brings to light the appalling story of Schäfer, who was born in Germany in 1921 and eventually joined the Hitler youth movement (and reportedly attempted to volunteer for the SS). After the war, he set up a religious-based orphanage until he was charged with molesting two children. He fled Germany in 1959 and ultimately emigrated to Chile with a group of his supporters, where he set up the Colonia. After the end of the Pinochet era, his crimes were gradually revealed. Schäfer was jailed for child sexual abuse in 2006 and died four years later.

A lengthy September 2008 article, by Bruce Falconer, in the American Scholar, “The Torture Colony,” provides many grisly and revealing details. Falconer first notes that in the months following the September 1973 coup in Chile, some 45,000 people were arrested and taken to detention centers for interrogation. At least 1,500 were summarily executed.

In June 1974 Pinochet created the National Intelligence Directorate (DINA), a secret police force, “designed to hunt down and eliminate his political enemies. DINA agents routinely kidnapped regime opponents and delivered them to secret torture and execution centers located throughout Chile—including Colonia Dignidad.”

According to Falconer, Schäfer’s principal contribution to Pinochet’s operations “came in the instruction of DINA agents in the science of torture.” One survivor, Luis Peebles, described Schäfer’s participation in and supervision of his agonizing torture by electric wires attached to every part of his body. Based on the testimony of Peebles and other survivors, Amnesty International produced a 60-page report in 1977, “Colonia Dignidad: A German Community in Chile––A Torture Camp for the DINA.” Schäfer’s legal efforts managed to block the release of the report until 1997.

Falconer explains: “Contract torturing was not the worst of Schaefer’s collusion with the Pinochet regime: executions, perhaps of entire groups of prisoners, were sometimes carried out. … In truth, no one knows how many people were killed inside Colonia Dignidad. One former colono recently told Chilean government investigators that, on Schaefer’s orders, he once drove a busload of 35 political prisoners up into the Colonia’s wooded hills and left them in an isolated spot by the side of a dirt road. As he drove back down alone, he heard machine gun fire echoing through the forest. No bodies were ever recovered. … All that seems certain is that many of the prisoners who went into Colonia Dignidad were never seen again.”

Of note is the fact that Michael Townley, a professional assassin who was the primary liaison between Colonia Dignidad and the Pinochet regime, was an American CIA agent, who also served as a member of DINA, and assisted in the military coup that ousted Allende. Townley designed the torture chamber at Colonia Dignidad and participated in biological experiments on prisoners there. In 1976, he was convicted of the murder of Orlando Letelier, former Chilean ambassador to the US.

Swedish actor Michael Nyqvist as Schäfer is chilling in Gallenberger’s well-made, heart-pounding piece. The movie offers an up-close look at the torture chambers and human filth like Schäfer, who began with the Nazis and ended up a creature of the CIA.

Regarding the overthrow of the Allende regime, Henry Kissinger, US Secretary of State at the time, infamously remarked that “I don’t see why we need to stand by and watch a country go communist due to the irresponsibility of its people. The issues are much too important for the Chilean voters to be left to decide for themselves.” Instead, he helped give them torture and brain-washing factories run by lunatics.

Chile Wins First Oscar With Dictatorship-Inspired Animated Film


JSC: Jamaicans in Solidarity with Cuba

Sources:  TeleSURThe Wrap
February 28 2016

Gabriel Osario bear story chile oscar.pngGabriel Osorio and Pato Escala’s Bear Story won the Oscar for Best Animated Short. It is Chile’s first ever Oscar Academy Award. | Photo: Bear Story


The animated short Bear Story tells the story of a sad bear torn away from his family, a symbol of the suffering under Chile’s military dictatorship.

Source:  TeleSUR
February 28 2016

A Chilean filmmaker made history on Sunday, bringing home the first ever Oscar Academy Award for the South American country with the animated film Bear Story, winner of the Best Animated Short.

“Bear Story” is an ingenious, dazzling piece of 3D animation, the sad story of a lonesome bear who builds an elaborate mechanical diorama in an attempt to remember (and perhaps recover) the life he used to live with his wife and son, before he was ripped from his home and sent to a…

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Chilean Pinochet dictatorship soldier confesses massacre


This Associated Press video from Chile says about itself:

University of Santiago symbolically graduates 39 students who disappeared after Pinochet coup

31 July 2015

Ahead of next week’s 40th anniversary of the coup that began Chile’s brutal regime under General Augusto Pinochet, the University of Santiago on Friday symbolically graduated 39 students who disappeared or were executed during this period.

On the day of the coup, military officers swept the University of Santiago campus in the Chilean capital, took thousands of students and teachers as prisoners and moved them to a nearby stadium.

Many former prisoners have reported they were tortured and abused while detained and some others were killed.

Others were never seen again.

Initially, organisers planned to leave 39 empty chairs in honour of the students, but so many people attended Friday’s ceremony the seats had to be filled.

Ana Araneda Yevenes, the sister of Rafael Araneda Yevenes, a student who disappeared on 12 December 1974, attended the ceremony with her family to collect her brother’s diploma.

“This is wonderful because after so many years, after waiting so long, after so many things, this is comforting for the family,” Yevenes said while holding a portrait of her brother.

The head of the University of Santiago Juan Manuel Zolezzi presided over the symbolic graduation.

Zolezzi called the relatives of the absent students one by one and presented a diploma in their honour.

“I find it remarkable that students who participated in such a big way in the Popular Unity period are recognised, they gave their lives, as students,” said Luis Aravena Mardones, who received a diploma on behalf of his brother, Jorge Aravena Mardones.

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera on Thursday asked anyone with information about those who “disappeared” to come forward and help heal the country’s wounds.

In 2011 Pinera’s [right-wing] government officially recognised 9,800 more victims of the dictatorship.

That increased the total list of people killed, tortured or imprisoned for political reasons during Pinochet’s regime to 40,018.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Former Chilean military man confesses 18 executions on the radio

Today, 13:50

The Chilean police have arrested a 62-year-old former soldier on suspicion of murder. The man was found after he had told on the radio about eighteen executions he carried out during the dictatorship of General Pinochet.

ON Wednesday the man who called himself ‘Alberto’ phoned to a popular Chilean radio. He said he wanted to commit suicide.

After a brief conversation about a failed relationship, the man started speaking about his involvement in executions of opponents of Pinochet, who was in power between 1973 and 1990.

The presenter of Sentimental Chacotero was getting quieter and quieter as the man told about the first time he killed someone. “I cried, but the lieutenant said I was a good soldier, a brave soldier.”

“Pow, pow,” the caller yelled. And then: “The second time I liked it, then I enjoyed it.”.

What followed was a conversation of twenty minutes, in which ‘Alberto’ said he was involved in eighteen executions. He also explains what happened to the bodies, a question about which many survivors have struggled in recent decades. “We blew the bodies up with dynamite. There was nothing left of them, not even their shadow.”

The caller did not give his real name, but the police tracked him yesterday and arrested him. He is 62-year-old Guillermo Reyes Rammsy. He has been officially charged with the murder of two members of the Socialist Party who were arrested in 1973. Their bodies were never found.

Chilean human rights organizations welcome the arrest and hope that there is now greater clarity about the fate of many disappeared opponents of the Pinochet regime. An estimated 40,000 people were arrested and tortured during the military dictatorship.

US Pinochet ally prosecuted for murder, 2011


This video says about itself:

Was U.S. Journalist Charles Horman Killed by Chile’s Coup Regime With Aid of His Own Government? 1/2

9 September 2013

As we continue our look at the 40th anniversary of the U.S.-backed military coup in Chile and the ongoing efforts by the loved ones of its victims to seek justice, we turn to the case of Charles Horman.

A 31-year-old American journalist and filmmaker, Horman was in Chile during the coup and wrote about U.S. involvement in overthrowing the democratically elected president, Salvador Allende. Shortly after, he was abducted by Chilean soldiers and later killed. Horman’s story was told in the 1982 Oscar-nominated film, “Missing,” which follows his father, Edmund Horman, going to Chile to search for his son.

We’re joined by Charles Horman’s widow, Joyce Horman, who filed a criminal suit against Pinochet for his role in her husband’s death, and established the Charles Horman Truth Project to support ongoing investigations into human rights violations during Pinochet’s regime. We’re also joined by Peter Weiss, vice president of the board of the Center for Constitutional Rights, who represented the Horman family in their case against Kissinger and others for Charles Horman’s death.

And this video is the sequel.

5 December 2011: A judge in Chile has issued an indictment against a retired US Navy officer in connection with the arrest and murder of two American journalists, Charles Horman and Frank Terrugi, in the wake of the CIA-backed military coup that toppled the government of President Salvador Allende: here.

Pinochet dictatorship in Chile and the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Uncovering Pinochet‘s Secret Death Camps

7 April 2014

Facing the Past: Revealing the truth about Chile’s dirty war.

For more information visit here.

In Chile, the murderous past under dictator general Augusto Pinochet is slowly coming under scrutiny. With new evidence of extermination camps, the families of the disappeared are yearning for justice.

“I started to testify and began to get rid of those pangs of guilt”, confesses Jorgelino Vergara. Aged only 15, Jorgelino worked as waiter at the secret Simon Bolivar extermination centre witnessing horrific torture and murder. More than 3000 people were kidnapped and killed after the army general seized power in 1973. After a long investigation, charges are being laid against more than seventy people accused of involvement in the brutality at Simon Bolivar.

One of them is a member of the much feared Lautaro Brigade, Adriana Rivas. From the safety of her Australian exile, she denies charges but her views on torture remain chilling: “Everyone knew they had to do that in order to break them because Communists would not talk. It was necessary”. The secrets and brutality of the Pinochet regime are laid bare at Santiago’s memory museum. The daughter of one of Rivas’ victims, who was beaten to a pulp and then injected with a lethal poison, is now a curator there. As she fights for remembrance and justice, she wonders: “How can a human being be part of this machinery of exterminating people?”

By John Green:

The conflicted alliance which brutally devastated Chile

Monday 29th June 2015

Reagan and Pinochet: The Struggle Over US Policy Towards Chile by M Morley and C McGillon (Cambridge University Press, £22.99)

IT IS one of the real tragedies of history that unpalatable truths invariably only come out many years after the events when we can do little about them.

This is certainly true of the criminal and blatant involvement of the US in the affairs of Chile that was instrumental in ousting a democratically elected socialist president and for the loss of the lives of many wonderful people.

In this book, the first comprehensive study of the Reagan administration’s policy towards Chile, the authors state: “During the first three decades of the 20th century, the United States transformed itself from a dominant regional into a competitive global power, all the while projecting its power abroad driven less by a desire ‘to make the world a safer place for democracy’ than to put down nationalist threats to an expanding US capital and commerce.” Chile came into that category.

Returning from leave a few days after president Allende’s 1970 election victory, a US official said that the White House “had gone ape. They were frantic, beside themselves.”

President Nixon immediately instructed the CIA to prevent Allende taking power and, although they were unsuccessful they did, with Henry Kissinger’s help, destroy his government in a brutal military coup led by their puppet General Pinochet.

The authors demonstrate how over the years — even for the US — the brutality and vehemence, with which Pinochet used to stamp on democracy in Chile, was damaging its image as an upholder of democracy and human rights.

The Chilean example was replicated throughout Latin America with terrible and long-lasting repercussions. Under Ronald Reagan the US made efforts to bring Pinochet to heel and put pressure on him to moderate the malevolence of his dictatorship, while at the same time being happy to have a right-wing authoritarian regime in control in Chile.

Reagan is shown by the authors to be an effete and ignorant individual, certainly in terms of world affairs. He was happy to let his presidential team do all the detailed negotiations and footwork for him. He was the ideal front man for a cabal of right-wing ideologues — the jovial and avuncular movie screen president behind whom the ruthless conspirators could hide.

The book is dense, and of course only covers the Reagan years, after much of the dirty work had been done. It also largely ignores what the US was doing in the other Latin American countries at the time but, even so, its meticulous and illuminating research makes it a highly useful reference work.

Chilean dictator Pinochet’s torture victims remembered musically


This video is called Crimes of Pinochet – Chile.

By Luke James in Britain:

Voices of Pinochet torture victims get a hearing

Friday 2nd January 2015

A “TORTURE soundtrack” of songs written and sung by Chileans imprisoned during General Augusto Pinochet’s regime is set to be released after being compiled by a Britain-based academic.

Manchester University announced on New Year’s Eve that an online archive of recordings — some secretly recorded and smuggled out of the fascist dictator’s concentration camps — would go live on January 8.

A choir founded in one of the 1,000 camps will be among the musicians to perform at the launch event at the Chilean Museum of Memory and Human Rights.

The Captive Songs project will also tell the stories behind the morale-boosting songs sung by some of the 40,000 mostly left-wing activists imprisoned by Pinochet.

Dr Luis Cifuentes, who wrote and performed during his detention before going on to study at Manchester University during the 1980s, explained how music helped prisoners cope with the harsh conditions.

“This archive is of great importance because it reflects not only a very rich cultural heritage but also the ways in which the victims used their own cultural identity to overcome horrific moments,” he said.

This music video is El Cigarrito by Victor Jara.

Visitors to the website will be able to listen to recordings of songs such as El Cigarrito by socialist folk musician Victor Jara — the most famous musician killed by the Pinochet regime.

The collection was created by Chilean-born academic Dr Katia Chornik.

And she made an urgent appeal for former prisoners who may have fled Chile during the dictatorship to come forward with new material.

“It’s been over 40 years since the onset of the dictatorship, so the time to collect this valuable material is very limited indeed,” said Ms Chornik.

See also here.

Chilean Pinochet dictatorship’s sexual abuse


This 9 November 2013 video says about itself:

The Colony: Chile’s dark past uncovered | Al Jazeera Correspondent

How did a secret German sect in Chile become a haven for Nazi fugitives and a torture centre for the Pinochet regime?

Forty years after the US-backed military coup that brought General Augusto Pinochet to power in Chile, the truth about the sordid abuses and crimes that took place during his dictatorship are still emerging.

The mountains of Patagonia in southern Chile witnessed a particularly bizarre chapter of the Pinochet era; one that is still claiming victims today. In 1961, a former Nazi corporal called Paul Schaefer fled Germany, along with hundreds of others, to found a sect in southern Chile.

In an idyllic rural enclave framed by the Andes Mountains he created a virtual state within a state – one where horrifying events unfolded. Initially with the ignorance of the government, and then with the complicity of the Pinochet regime, children were separated from their parents at birth and raised in a Kinder House. Men and women were kept apart and often drugged, while Schaefer systematically sexually abused boys and, occasionally, girls.

It also served as a haven for Nazi fugitives – such as Walter Rauff, the inventor of the portable gas chamber, and Joseph Mengele, the so-called ‘Angel of Death’ – who were permitted to hide out there in exchange for overseeing sophisticated forms of torture.

All of this took place with the full knowledge of the Pinochet regime, whose notorious intelligence chief, General Manuel Contreras, would often visit the site.

In The Colony: Chile’s dark past uncovered, the truth about what took place inside the Colony is revealed through the story of Winfried Hempel. Now 35, Hempel was born into the Colony and raised there without any knowledge of who his parents were. When he first left its grounds, he was 20 years old, spoke no Spanish, had no notion of the country in which he lived and had never seen a television, computer or mobile phone.

Although he initially struggled to adapt to the world beyond Colonia Dignidad, he gradually learned to speak Spanish, received his high school certificate and eventually qualified as a lawyer. Al Jazeera’s Lucia Newman has followed the story of the Colonia Dignidad since 1996 – at one point even being turned away from the site at gunpoint. As a Chilean, she wants to expose the crimes that took place there – crimes that her country was not only complicit in, but an active participant to.

Another video used to say about itself:

Torture and Child Sex Abuse in Chile Cult

5 February 2013

State sponsored torture, child sex abuse, nazis and evangelical preachers – sick Chile cult shocks the world.

This village in central Chile was for 40 years the domain of the notorious “Colonia Dignidad” cult, scene of multiple child sex abuse convictions.

Now witnesses are saying the sick sect was also used as a torture centre by the Chilean government under the Pinochet dictatorship.

Adriana Borquez says she was held against her will and tortured in the cult commune during 1975.

[Adriana Borquez, Torture Victim]:

“We want justice. There are detainees who were disappeared in Colonia Dignidad. There are graves of the people they killed, there are torture victims, there are hundreds of torture victims there.”

In January this year 16 cult leaders were sentenced for child sex abuse crimes, following the conviction of the cult’s leader back in 2006.

Political victims now want recognition that the closed society was also used by the Pinochet regime to torture dissidents.

[Adriana Borquez, Torture Victim]:

“We were detained in 1975. I came into exile in 1976 and since then not one day has passed that I have not worked for human rights and justice.”

The secretive sect was established in 1961 by former nazi turned evangelical preacher Paul Schaefer.

Schaefer died in prison in 2010 after being convicted of over 20 child sex abuse cases.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Brave women testify to Pinochet regime sex abuse

Thursday 4th December 2014

Socialist activists tell of fascist abuse

FOUR women who say they were sexually tortured as political prisoners following Chile’s 1973 fascist coup have testified in support of a complaint they hope will bring to light dictatorship-era rapes that have been buried by fear, shame and silence.

The allegations were made in a complaint filed in May and the women gave their testimony to Chilean judge Mario Carroza this week.

They are being allowed to raise the decades-old charges because of international human rights accords recently signed by Chile, said Mr Carroza, a specialist in crimes against humanity who is presiding over the case.

The women also are pressing Chile to update its 140-year-old penal code to classify the rape of political prisoners and torture as political crimes, which would subject violators to harsher sentences than currently allowed.

“We demand that the Chilean government, that the authorities and the state, change the laws and accept that this sort of sexual torture exists,” said Nieves Ayress, 66, a teacher and community activist now living in New York.

Ms Ayress was a 25-year-old socialist activist when she was detained in 1974 along with her father and 15-year-old brother. Upon her release in 1976 she was forced into exile.

She appeared before Carroza late Monday to present her testimony and underwent examinations to document the lasting psychological impact and physical scars she bears as a result of the alleged assaults – including being penetrated with rats and dogs and ordering her father and brother to rape her, though the rape wouldn’t actually take place.

It is unclear when Mr Carroza will formally accept the case and start the investigation that could lead to criminal charges.

Cristian Castillo, director of the memorial site created at a former torture centre known as Villa Grimaldi, said he has no doubt other victims will be emboldened to speak out “as a result of the declarations by these women that specifically denounce this crime against humanity.”

Officials say more than 40,000 people were victims of the dictatorship led by General Augusto Pinochet, including more than 3,000 who were killed.

More than four decades after two young US citizens were brutally tortured and murdered, along with thousands of Chilean workers, students and political activists, a court in Chile has sentenced two former military intelligence officers in connection with the crime, while directly indicting the US government for setting it into motion: here.

Chilean dictatorship officers charged for murdering singer Victor Jara


This video from Chile says about itself:

Victor Jara – Chile Stadium (his last song) English translation

Translated by Joan Jara. Read by Adrian Mitchell. From the album Manifiesto [Canciones Póstumas].

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Three more to be charged for Victor Jara’s murder

Friday 5th September 2014

Victor Jara’s widow welcomes announcement of three more murder charges

MARTYRED Chilean communist folk singer Victor Jara’s widow Joan Jara welcomed the announcement yesterday that three more people have been charged over his murder during the country’s 1973 CIA-backed military coup.

“This decision has to be celebrated and we hope this investigation can continue. We know this marks a milestone,” said Ms Jara.

A judge in Santiago charged former military officers Hernan Chancon Soto and Patricio Vasquez Donoso with taking part in the September 16 1973 killing.

He also charged ex-army prosecutor Ramon Melo Silva as an accomplice.

They join eight former army officers charged in late 2012 and early 2013 with killing the theatre director and singer-songwriter.

A prominent member of the Nueva Cancion Chilena (New Chilean Song) movement, Victor Jara wrote and performed works that tackled social and political issues and provided a musical backdrop to the electoral success of the Popular Unity alliance headed by Salvador Allende.

He and thousands of other Allende supporters were seized during General Augusto Pinochet’s military coup and held in a football stadium.

He was tortured, killed and his body dumped in the street.

His family filed a civil lawsuit in the US last year accusing former army lieutenant Pedro Barrientos Nunez of ordering soldiers to torture the singer.

Lt Barrientos was also said to have personally fired the fatal shot while playing a game of Russian roulette inside the Estadio Chile, where 5,000 Allende supporters were detained.

He left Chile in 1989 and lives in the US. He denies all involvement.