Cattle egret helps bull, photo


Bull and cattle egret

Dutch photographer bonteklepper made this photo in Extremadura in Spain on 19 June 2016.

It shows a cattle egret helping a bull which has trouble with insects.

Greenfinches, chaffinches, hawfinches at photography hide


Greenfinch male, 10 June 2016

On 10 June 2016, there were many bird species near the bird photography hide. Like this male greenfinch.

Greenfinch male, on 10 June 2016

Here is another male greenfinch photo.

Female greenfinch, 10 June 2016

This photo shows a female greenfinch.

This is a video from Britain, about male and female chaffinches in winter.

Chaffinch female, 10 June 2016

This photo shows a female chaffinch, on 10 June near the hide.

Male chaffinch, 10 June 2016

And this photo shows a male chaffinch.

Chaffinch and hawfinch, 10 June 2016

On these two photos, a male chaffinch on the left, and a hawfinch on the right.

Chaffinch and hawfinch, on 10 June 2016

Hawfinch and chaffinch couple, 10 June 2016

Finally, this photo. It shows, on the left, a hawfinch, a species of which there will soon be more photo hide photos on this blog. Then, from left to right: a great tit; a male chaffinch; a female chaffinch.

Osprey nest, flowers, spoonbills in Dutch Biesbosch


This 12 June 2016 video is from Biesbosch national park. For the first time ever in the Netherlands, as far as is known, an osprey couple built a nest there this year. It is said that three young birds have hatched.

You cannot see the young ospreys yet on this video, filmed at about 450 meter from the nest. However, at about 30 seconds into the video, you can see a young osprey defecating, in a curve over the side of the nest. About ten seconds later, the male bird arrives, to bring fish to the nesting female and the youngsters.

In the video, you can also hear edible frogs call.

On 18 June 2016, we went to the Biesbosch, to see the ospreys and other wildlife.

Biesbosch, 18 June 2016

Water and land interlock in the Biesbosch estuary scenery, creating opportunities for many wildlife species.

As we arrive, we see a male roe deer and a flying common tern.

We hear a Cetti’s warbler sing.

A sedge warbler.

Male and female reed bunting.

A male marsh harrier.

An osprey flies. A lesser black-backed gull tries to drive it away, though ospreys eat fish, not birds.

Crow garlic flowers.

A willow warbler sings.

Swifts flying.

A wren flies across a ditch. Beneath it, a coot couple and their three chicks swim.

A spoonbill foraging.

Tufted ducks.

A greenfinch sings.

Common bird's-foot trefoil

Yellow flowers: common bird’s-foot trefoil.

Two great crested grebes.

Hare's-foot clover, 18 June 2016

Pink flowers: hare’s-foot clover.

We arrive at the ospreys’. One of the parents sits on the nest.

This 4 June 2016 video by Luuk Punt is called Ospreys feeding their chick. First time seen in the Netherlands ever.

A cuckoo calls.

A juvenile white wagtail. Two little ringed plovers on the bank.

Two Egyptian geese flying.

Canada geese.

A northern lapwing. A great egret.

Then, we see about eight ruffs in summer plumage. Rare in the Netherlands!

We walk to a hide. We can see swifts and sand martins fly over the water.

Mural in hide, 18 June 2016

There is a mural on the inside of the hide: depicting a kingfisher, pintail duck, spoonbill, great cormorant, black-headed gull, wren, robin, great egret, tufted ducks and other birds.

Biesbosch museum, 18 June 2016

There was more art outside the Biesbosch museum.

Not far away, a nesting colony of many sand martins.

Biesbosch sky, 18 June 2016

Then, many gadwall ducks resting in the water.

Avocets with chicks.

A song thrush sings from a tree.

Biesbosch islet, 18 June 2016

On an islet, yellow fen ragwort flowers.

We return to the osprey nest. The female and the youngsters are inside. The male arrives, sitting on a branch.

A flock of about thirty spoonbills.

A buzzard lands on a tree.

A skylark sings.

Amphibians, mammals at bird photo hide


Edible frog, 10 June 2016

At the bird photography hide are not only birds. There are also other animals, like this edible frog.

Edible frogs, 10 June 2016

More than one edible frog in the pond just outside the hide.

Edible frogs, on 10 June 2016

Edible frog on bank, 10 June 2016

Sometimes, frogs sat on the bank, watching their mirror image in the pond.

Edible frogs in pond, 10 June 2016

Then, they jumped back in the water again.

Kingfishers sometimes visit the pond, but not when we were there on 10 June. Maybe there is more chance of seeing a kingfisher earlier in the year, when the frogs are in the tadpole stage and are easier to catch.

Kingfishers also eat another amphibian species living in the pond: smooth newts.

On 10 June, we often saw bank voles drinking at the pond and running around.

We did not see other mammal species living near the hide: roe deer; red squirrel; red fox.

Great spotted woodpeckers feeding their youngsters


Young great spotted woodpecker and its mother, 10 June 2016

After the blog posts about young great spotted woodpeckers and their parents, now this blog post about interaction between these two. Like this youngster with its red cap being fed by its mother on a branch near the bird photography hide.

Young great spotted woodpecker fed by its mother, 10 June 2016

Insect eating birds like woodpeckers are dependent on their parents for food for longer than seed eating birds like finches. An insect may crawl away or fly away; a seed cannot.

Great spotted woodpecker female feeds youngster, 10 June 2016

This woodpecker mother feeds her child on an old tree trunk.

Great spotted woodpecker female feeds her youngster, 10 June 2016

Great spotted woodpecker female feeding her youngster, 10 June 2016

Young great spotted woodpecker being fed, 10 June 2016

Later in the day, the young woodpeckers were still hungry.

Young great spotted woodpecker being fed by its mother, 10 June 2016

Young great spotted woodpecker fed, 10 June 2016

Young great spotted woodpeckers at photo hide


Young great spotted woodpecker, 10 June 2016

After the mainly adult great spotted woodpeckers of my earlier blog post, now young birds on 10 June 2016 at the bird photography hide. Like this one, with the red cap typical for its age, on a birch tree.

Young great spotted woodpecker bathing, 10 June 2016

Like the adult birds, the young woodpeckers liked bathing in the pool.

Young great spotted woodpecker bathing, on 10 June 2016

Young great spotted woodpecker on tree, 10 June 2016

The fledgling woodpeckers had only very recently learned flying. They still depended on their parents for food. However, they already knew how to sit vertically on a tree trunk.

Young great spotted woodpecker on tree, on 10 June 2016

Young great spotted woodpecker under branch, 10 June 2016

And how to hang horizontally under a branch.

Young great spotted woodpecker near hide, 10 June 2016

Bye bye for now, young woodpeckers! There will be another blog post about you.

Great spotted woodpeckers at photo hide


Female great spotted woodpecker, 10 June 2016

This photo shows an adult female great spotted woodpecker, drinking at the pool near the bird photography hide on 10 June 2016.

Female great spotted woodpecker drinking, 10 June 2016

So does this photo.

Female great spotted woodpecker on birch trunk, 10 June 2016

This photo shows an adult female great spotted woodpecker on a birch tree trunk.

Female great spotted woodpecker, on 10 June 2016

This is another adult female great spotted woodpecker photo.

Great spotted woodpecker pale male, 10 June 2016

This photo shows an adult male great spotted woodpecker; as we can see from the red spot on his neck. Its wings are paler than the usual black and white in this species. Maybe leucism?

Male great spotted woodpecker on oak tree, 10 June 2016

This photo shows an adult male great spotted woodpecker on a small oak tree.

Juvenile and adult female great spotted woodpecker, 10 June 2016

And this photo shows, on the left, a juvenile great spotted woodpecker, with its red cap. On the right, an adult female.

Stay tuned, as there will be more blog posts on the woodpeckers and other birds near the photo hide!