Film on 1871 Paris Commune reviewed


This video from London, England says about itself:

15 February 2017

The New Babylon is a 1929 Russian silent film about the 1871 Paris Commune. It was directed by Grigori Kozintsev and Leonid Trauberg, with a musical score by Dmitri Shostakovich. Ian Christie, Professor of Film and Media History at Birkbeck College, explains the importance of this film from a political and film history context.

French police cruelty against homeless refugees


This video says about itself:

Afghan refugees in Greece may be deported

5 October 2016

European governments have signed an agreement with Kabul to send back an unlimited number of Afghan refugees. This comes just before the Donor Conference on Afghanistan hosted by the European Union. CCTV’s Filio Kontrafouri reports from the Greek island of Lesbos, which is home to thousands of migrants.

By Bethany Rielly:

France: Police rip sleeping bags from rough sleeping refugees

Tuesday 14th February 2017

POLICE in Paris have been threatening refugees sleeping rough with tear gas and even taking blankets off them in sub-zero weather.

Research by the Refugee Rights Data Project, published in the Independent at the weekend, reveals that more than half of refugees in Paris have been violently moved on by authorities which have adopted a zero-tolerance policy to roadside shelters.

Most incidents took place in La Chapelle where refugees queue for places at a humanitarian centre, opened by the French government in Novemeber, sometimes for two weeks.

One Afghan man said: “If we question them or say we have nowhere to go, they bring out the tear gas.”

British teacher Sarah Fenby-Dixon, who has been volunteering with refugees in Paris since July, told the Star: “In Britain teargasing would be the last line of defence but here it seems to be the first.”

Refugees are not allowed to put up tents, forcing them to sleep under bridges or out in the open.

However, Ms Fenby-Dixon said that police had even prevented them from taking shelter under bridges by placing boulders there.

“They just want them out of sight. The whole policy is to make it as difficult for them as possible,” she said.

Ms Fenby-Dixon even highlighted a case of a refugee from Afghanistan who had been beaten in the kidneys by police, despite having kidney problems.

Reports by the Refugee Rights Data Project detailed accounts by volunteers who had witnessed officers taking people’s belongings — sometimes in broad daylight.

An estimated 400-500 refugees, mostly from Afghanistan, Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia, sleep rough on the streets of Paris.

In France, death of Adama Traoré, and of civil liberties?


This video says about itself:

France: #BlackLivesMatter activists demand justice for Adama Traoré in Paris

23 July 2016

Hundreds of ‘#BlackLivesMatter‘ activists marched through Paris, Saturday, to protest against police brutality and institutional racism in France. In particular, the protest was dedicated to the death of Adama Traoré who died in police custody earlier in the week.

The protesters, including Traoré’s relatives, gathered at Place Joachim-du-Bellay in central Paris and marched around the square while carrying ‘#BlackLivesMatter‘ banners and chanting “Justice for Adama” and “Black Lives Matter.” A strong police presence was deployed to prevent the crowd from marching on through downtown Paris.

The protest came after 24-year-old Adama Traoré died in police custody near Paris last Tuesday following his arrest for extortion charges. Local authorities claim that Traoré fell prey to a ‘serious infection,’ adding that the autopsy did not reveal any traces of violence. Traoré’s friends and family reject the claims however, accusing police of his death.

SOT, Franco, protester (French): “We are here to demand justice for Adama Traoré because we are not talking of conspiracy, we say that we must study the mechanics of police logic to understand that their logic is deeply rooted in slavery and colonialism and we can’t understand the inequitable logic of this policy if we don’t study its colonial roots that was created to hunt black people.”

SOT, protester (French): “In a country like France, the country of human rights, freedom, equality, fraternity, we are not equal at all. We do not understand why we should raise our children in fear. And so we condemn all police officers who have committed crimes without punishment.”

By Kumaran Ira in France:

Adama Traoré’s autopsy undermines French police’s account of his death

2 August 2016

On Saturday, nearly 600 people gathered before Gare du Nord in Paris demanding the “truth” about the circumstances of the death of 24-year-old Adama Traoré in police custody on July 19. The rally, planned by the Traoré family, was halted by police.

Traoré’s death triggered riots in his hometown, Beaumont-sur-Oise, and in several other Paris suburbs, where security forces were deployed under the French state of emergency to crack down on the protests.

CRS riot police blocked the procession, citing an order by the Paris police prefecture to prevent it from taking place. The prefecture’s communiqué claimed the protest ban was necessary for “reasons linked to the protection of the institutions,” “to the preservation of public order,” and to ensure “the security of the protesters themselves.” It claimed that authorisation to protest had been denied because the application had been filed too late, after the deadline of three days before the event.

This reactionary ban is yet an attack on the right to assemble and to protest, amid the all but permanent state of emergency imposed by the Socialist Party (PS) government of President François Hollande. When youth and workers protested again the PS’s regressive labour law this spring, the PS sent riot police to crack down on protests, and ultimately took the unprecedented step of threatening to ban protests outright.

Claims that the Traoré family and its supporters are a threat to public order are brazen lies. Insofar as these claims have any foundation in fact, it is that the police and the French state fear that allowing any expression [of] social opposition to police brutality will lead to an uncontrolled explosion of social anger. Many French suburbs suffer from deep social crises, and in particular from soaring youth unemployment, and in recent years they have witnessed mass urban riots pitting police against the population, notably in 2005 and 2007.

By banning the rally, the authorities are seeking to whitewash the lies told by the authorities in the aftermath of Traoré’s death. New autopsy reports have revealed that Traoré died of asphyxia, refuting various, mutually contradictory police accounts of Traoré’s death that attributed it either to cardiac arrest or to infections of his internal organs.

The first autopsy report highlighted “an infectious phenomenon on several organs,” including the lungs and liver, and “no kind of violence to cause death,” which remains unexplained. Traoré’s family then requested another autopsy by an outside expert.

The new autopsy report by the outside expert, the Medical-Legal Institute of Paris, found no evidence of heart disease or internal infections. The asphyxia that caused his death was likely the result of overwhelming force employed by the police during his arrest.

“We used only the force that was strictly necessary to control him,” police claimed. However, they added, “He had to bear the weight of all three of us at the moment that he was arrested.”

The Traoré family’s lawyer, Yassine Bouzrou, said, “We have the cause of his death, asphyxia. Given the statements of the police, I would propose the hypothesis that the cause of death was compression of the thorax. The police got three people together to crush him, that could be a weight of approximately 240 kilograms.”

Another lawyer retained by the family, Frédéric Zajac, wondered how it was possible that the outside expert report “has found no infection” while the first autopsy had revealed “a serious infection of the lungs, liver and trachea.”

“The problem, is that this young man of 24 years of age died of an asphyxia syndrome whose mechanisms the experts cannot determined,” Zajac said, who asked that “the truth be uncovered.”

In a statement, a relative of Traoré declared, “First they said it was a heart attack, then an infection, now it is asphyxia. … What are they hiding from us? What really happened? From the beginning, youth in the neighborhood said the arrest took place in a violent fashion.”

“My brother died over a week ago, and we still do not know what caused his death. It is very difficult to mourn him under these conditions,” wrote Lassana Traoré in the statement.

Traore’s family is demanding a third autopsy report, which has been rejected by the judge handling the case. Two parallel investigations are conducted by the Research Section and the General Inspectorate of the Gendarmerie (paramilitary police).

Maryland, USA: Korryn Gaines: Mother holding five-year-old son shot dead by police during traffic violations arrest stand-off: here.

Novel on Paris Commune, review


This August 2015 video from Britain is called Liberty’s Fire by Lydia Syson and The Quietness by Alison Rattle.

By John Green in Britain:

Days of the Commune come thrillingly to life

Thursday 24th March 2016

Liberty’s Fire
by Lydia Syson
(Hot Key Books, £7.99)

WRITING fiction for teenagers is a particularly difficult task. Pitching a story so that it does not come across as too childish, or reeks of the musty adult world, takes great skill.

The question becomes even more acute when the subject matter is historical. How can a writer bring history alive for a younger generation without over-simplifying or becoming bogged down in explanatory detail? And then there is the gender question — do you offer romance or swashbuckling action?

Lydia Syson manages to achieve a delicate balance between all those contending issues in this novel about the Paris Commune.

Liberty’s Fire may take a while to get off the ground but the reader is very soon swept up into the turmoil, drama and conflict during the siege of Paris in 1871 when the reactionary French government, led by Adolphe Thiers and supported by his erstwhile enemy the Prussians, crushed the popular take-over of the city.

The Commune was the first workers’ revolution with a radical, socialist agenda. It lasted for just over two months and was suppressed with the utmost brutality by the French ruling class. Between 20-35,000 people were killed, with 4,000 deported to the French colonies and many more imprisoned or driven into exile. Marx and Engels viewed the Commune both as an event that validated their theories and as an experience from which the working-class movement could learn.

Syson brings this pivotal episode of 19th-century history glowingly alive.

Through the eyes of the young violinist Anatole and the orphaned working-class girl Zephyrine, both recent arrivals in the city, we experience the refusal of Parisians to accept the French government’s servile capitulation.

Instead, they decide to run the city themselves.

The couple, meeting on the street in unusual circumstances, soon fall in love. Both are unwittingly sucked into the turmoil and soon become actively involved in the defence of the Commune.

With its defeat, Anatole manages to escape to exile to England via Geneva, while Zephyrine is transported to New Caledonia.

Romance is at the centre of a book which even so never becomes sentimental.

The love story is firmly embedded in the historic fabric of the events, with the reader learning about a historical process while following the riveting fate of the two protagonists.

There is a marked feminist element, with strong women playing central roles, not as mere decoration, and perhaps this may make it a novel which appeals more to girls than boys.

But, as the anniversary of the Commune is marked over the coming weeks, this is a great read for young people — and adults for that matter — irrespective of gender.

Lydia Syson will be discussing her work as part of the Children and Socialism series of events at the Marx Memorial Library, Clerkenwell Green, London EC1 on March 31, details: marxlibrary.org.uk.

GORDON PARSONS recommends a new book which gives a graphic account of the rise and fall of the Paris Commune: here.

French people demonstrate for free speech


This video from France says about itself:

France: Thousands protest extending state of emergency in Paris

30 January 2016

Thousands of left-wing activists and members of leftist syndicates and organisations gathered in Paris on Saturday to protest against the proposal of extending of the state of emergency in the city and the concept of ‘deprivation of nationality’ for persons who are assumed to be terrorists by the French government in the future.

Bastien, activist (French): “I am here to protest against the state of emergency and for the deprivation of nationality for bi-national persons (born in France) that has been planned … . That’s important because we saw a lot of things during the state of emergency, some people got house arrest without reason, some rallies were prohibited, some people were arrested just for protesting peacefully. That shocks me.”

The pretext for these anti-democratic measures is the horrible murders in Paris; not by demonstrators, but by a small clique of criminals from France and Brussels. These perpetrators are dead. The state of emergency does not harm these perpetrators. It harms free speech for everyone. It meant police force prevented hundreds of thousands of people from demonstrating against climate change and pollution by corporations like Volkswagen. It meant that the Volkswagen and similar corporate fat cats could lobby politicians in smoke-filled backrooms, without countervailing power of protesters in the streets of Paris. It meant police attacks on pro-refugee demonstrations. It means attacks on workers’ rights, etc.

British government not helping Paris ISIS victims


This video from Britain says about itself:

Paris terror attacks survivor British women say Islam and migrants must not be blamed

15 November 2015

British women who survived Paris terror attacks say Islam and migrants must not be blamed

Christine Tudhope and Mariesha Payne that when they first heard gun shots they thought it was firecrackers and part of the show

The Scottish survivors of the Paris terror attacks first thought the shots were firecrackers and part of the show.

The pair have also spoken out to say that Muslims must not be blamed for the atrocities.

Christine Tudhope, 34, said she initially thought the gunfire was the sound of firecrackers, but then Mariesha Payne, 33, saw bullets hitting the stage.

Speaking to Sky News as they arrived from Paris at Edinburgh Airport they said they thought the bangs were part of the show.

Mariesha said: “People gasped thinking it was part of the show.

“A second round went off, most people ducked, but I just said run, just get out of here.”

The pair hid from the Paris gunmen in a cellar and had to listen to the massacre for three hours.

Now the pair have urged that Islam should not be blamed for the attacks.

Christine said: “It has nothing to do with Islam. It is just mindless terrorism. The Islamic community will condemn this just as much as us.

Mariesha agreed saying: “This is nothing to do with the majority of immigrants.

Migrants are fleeing this. This is their life – daily.”

By Lamiat Sabin in Britain:

Still No Aid for Isis Victims

Saturday 16th January 2016

Nov 13: Paris is attacked. Dec 2: Britain bombs Syria. Jan 14: Guns cleared for 600 PCs [see also here]

A SURVIVOR of the Paris shootings was left high and dry yesterday after Westminster suits told her she’d have to wait for compensation — because they still haven’t officially declared the murderous rampage a “terror attack.”

Christine Tudhope, from Fife, and her friend Mariesha Payne were enjoying the Eagles of Death Metal concert at the Bataclan, Paris, on November 13 last year when Isis-affiliated gunmen stormed the hall and killed 89 people.

When they realised shots were being fired, the pair ran and hid in the cellar for three hours. They heard the sounds of shooting, screaming and the crash of dead bodies hitting the floor. At one point gunmen walked close by the room — the hideaways could hear them on walkie-talkies telling French police that they had hostages.

Ms Tudhope, a PR officer at Heriot-Watt University, made a claim for compensation with the Victims of Overseas Terrorism Compensation Scheme, which was set up by the Tory-led coalition in 2012.

But she received a letter last week stating: “The scheme only applies to an incident which the Foreign Secretary has determined a ‘designated act [of terrorism]’. The incident in which you sustained injury has not been designated.”

The government lists terrorist acts that can be claimed for on its website.

These include the hostage crisis in Algeria (2013), the kidnap of Setraco employees in Nigeria (2013), the attack at Westgate shopping centre in Kenya (2013), the attack at the Bardo National Museum in Tunisia (2015) and the attack at Port El Kantaoui in Tunisia (2015).

But more than two months after becoming the most infamous European attack for a decade, Paris is yet to make the list.

Labour MP Paul Flynn told the Star that he was “bowled over by the depths of government imbecility” in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office dragging its feet even though it only took hours last month for MPs to vote for Syria air strikes.

The motion was passed in the Commons with a huge majority of 174 six weeks ago.

Mr Flynn, a vocal opponent of war who represents Newport West, added: “This was an act of terrorism and there is no room for debate. What else could it be?

“This is typical of the moronic state of government. They declare war in a couple of hours and take a decade to deal with the implications after tying themselves up in gobbledegook regulations.

“This case sounds like another piece of bureaucratic unnecessary complication which is clogging up the system and the swift administration of compensation.”

A Foreign Office spokeswoman told the Star: “The Foreign Secretary’s approval of the designation process was a formality required under the legal process. The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority will now take this forward.”

A Ministry of Justice spokesman said the letter sent to Ms Tudhope was “clumsily worded.”