Young red-tailed hawk hatched in Cornell, USA

This video from the USA says about itself:

18 April 2012

See what it took to bring live streaming video of a pair of Red-tailed Hawks on Cornell’s campus. The technical crew worked day and night to install the cams early in the nesting season, before the hawks laid their eggs on a light tower 70 feet above an athletic field. To see the live feed during the nesting season, go to

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

May 4, 2015

Hatch Alert!

Under the cover of the predawn darkness, viewers of the Cornell Hawks‘ cam were the first welcome a new nestling hawk to the world. Big Red was incubating at the time, and while sightings of the nestling were difficult, she could be seen pulling pieces of broken eggshell from beneath her. As morning’s light arrived, we got our first glimpse of the hatchling, looking downy and bobbling energetically beneath its parents (watch highlight.)

Cornell red-tailed hawks about to hatch

This video from the USA is called Cornell [Red-tailed] Hawks [at their nest] Highlights 2014.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

May 1, 2015

Hawk Hatch Alert!

Spring is in the air here in Ithaca, New York, and that can mean only one thing: baby birds! Our Cornell Red-tailed Hawks have been an exciting addition to our springtime birding over the last four years, giving us new opportunities to learn about and enjoy the daily lives of a hawk family perched high above the Cornell campus. Now they’re poised to bring a fourth set of young hawks into the world.

Since our first year broadcasting this nest, the hawks’ eggs have hatched around 35-39 days after being laid. This year’s first egg was laid on March 28, and today we’re 34 days into the incubation period. Submit your guess as to when the first downy hatchling will be seen on cam and you could win an embroidered Cornell Lab stadium blanket, perfect for spring outings.

You can comment and keep up with the day-to-day happenings on our cams on the Bird Cams Facebook page and on the Cornell Hawks Twitter Feed.

Thank you for watching and good luck!

Watch the Hawks Now

New York migratory birds endangered by lighting

This video from the USA says about itself:

This video from the USA says about itself:

Bird Watching: Spring Warblers in Central Park, New York City

During their spring migration many beautiful birds pass through Central Park. Shown are just 18 of the colorful migrating Warblers with their stunning plumage: Palm, Prairie, Yellow, Worm-eating, Magnolia, a graceful American Redstart, Hooded, Black-throated Blue, Northern Parula, Blackpoll, Bay-breasted, Ovenbird, Black-and-white, a Northern Waterthrush singing and foraging, Canada, Common Yellowthroat, a Yellow-rumped bathing and a Black-throated Green Warbler preening and drying off after a bath. Filmed April 12 – May 26, 2014 in Central Park, New York City.

This video from the USA says about itself:

28 April 2015

The state of New York is to turn off non-essential lights in state-run buildings to help birds navigate their migratory routes in spring and autumn.

Migrating birds are believed to use stars to navigate but they can be disorientated by electric lights, causing them to crash into buildings.

The phenomenon, known as “fatal light attraction”, is estimated to kill up to one billion birds a year in the US.

Millions of birds migrate through New York along the Atlantic Flyway route.

Now those passing over the city by night will stand a better chance of making it further north.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that bright outdoor lights will be turned off between 23:00 and dawn during peak migration seasons in spring and autumn.

The state will join several well-known New York landmarks that have already signed up to the National Audubon Society‘s Lights Out programme, including the Rockefeller Centre, Chrysler Building and Time Warner Centre.

“This is a simple step to help protect these migrating birds that make their home in New York’s forests, lakes and rivers,” Mr Cuomo said in a statement.

He also announced the new “I Love NY Birding” website, which will provide information on bird watching and how to participate in the Lights Out initiative.

The National Audubon Society already works with other major cities to protect birds from strikes, including Baltimore, Chicago, and San Francisco.

Fatal light attraction appears to affect migratory songbirds such as warblers, thrushes and sparrows more than local birds, who learn where they can fly safely.

Daniel Klem, professor of ornithology and conservation biology at Muhlenberg College who pioneered the study of window strikes, told the BBC last year that the strikes were particularly worrying because the fittest members of the population were just as likely to die in this way as weaker birds.

“You may be killing some very important members of the population that would be instrumental in maintaining its health,” he said.

Writing in the New Yorker earlier this month, US novelist and bird-lover Jonathan Franzen criticised the developers of a Minnesota stadium for neglecting to use a specially patterned glass that may reduce collisions.

From the BBC, about the USA (with video there):

Why New York is to switch off lights for migrating birds

28 April 2015 Last updated at 09:07 BST

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced that the state of New York is to turn off non-essential lights in state-run buildings.

But rather than this being an energy saving measure – instead, it is to help migrating birds navigate routes in spring and autumn.

Ornithologists say that birds become disorientated by electric lights, causing them to crash into buildings – also known as “fatal light attraction“.

Lucas De Jong explains.

Read more here.

Cornell red-tailed hawks on webcam again

This video from the USA is called 2014 04 30 163341 Cornell hawks 7 30 pm feeding.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Cornell’s most watched Red-tailed Hawks, Big Red and Ezra, have returned to begin breeding. This year they are investing in their 2012 nest site, located about 200 meters from their nest of the last two years. A last-minute effort to get a new set of cams up on the old site required coordination from staff across campus, and the good news is that the installation was successful. Watch cam.

We typically don’t launch new cams on Fridays, because we have fewer resources to fix any issues that might arise over the weekend. However, it’s entirely possible that Big Red will lay her first egg soon, and we want you to have the best chance of seeing it happen. They’ve been visiting the nest off and on over the last week, and have been spotted mating atop nearby structures.

Chat will reopen in the coming weeks—till then, stay tuned to the cam as Big Red and Ezra prepare for the coming season. Thanks for watching!

Wildlife and cycling in the Adirondacks, USA

This video from New York in the USA is called Introducing Cycle Adirondacks.

From the Wildlife Conservation Society in the USA:

Escape to the Adirondacks

Save your spot!

Next summer, the Wildlife Conservation Society is hosting the first-ever Cycle Adirondacks, a fully supported, road-bicycle tour of New York’s Adirondack Park that runs from August 23-29, 2015.

It’ll feature breathtaking rides through immense natural beauty. We’ll have gourmet catered meals and hot showers, live entertainment, and a beer and wine garden each night.

But what’s really going to set this trip apart: WCS naturalists are coming along to showcase and interpret the natural landscape as you experience it. Our experts will immerse you in the wildlife and wild lands we work so hard to preserve. Not to mention, you’ll visit dozens of picturesque, historic communities in the area. All the Adirondacks has to offer.

If you’re looking for a challenge, an amazing new place to explore, a reconnection with the Adirondacks, or just a great vacation, Cycle Adirondacks promises to be a bucket-list adventure. Check it out.

Registration is capped at 600 riders (and we’re expecting a sold-out event). So sign up now! If only one spouse or partner is interested in riding, we’ve got a great Travel Companion program planned for non-riders.

P.S. We’re also looking for volunteers to support the event. Visit our website to learn more.

Cornell red-tailed hawks’ nest in 2014

This video from the USA says about itself:

17 September 2014

For over 100 days viewers watched the lives of a very special Red-tailed Hawk family nesting 80ft above an athletics field on a light pole at the Cornell University Campus in Ithaca, New York. For the third year we experienced what it takes for two devoted parents to raise three healthy young hawks in the wild.

United States woman jailed for photographing pro-peace protest

This 11 July 2014 video from the USA is called Grandmother Sentenced to 1 Year in Prison After Protest at U.S. Drone Base.

From Alternet in the USA:

By Alyssa Figueroa

Woman Sentenced to Prison for Photographing a War Protest

‘We are losing a generation because of drones’ says activist Mary Anne Grady Flores.

July 26, 2014

Warplanes have long been based at Hancock Field Air National Guard Base in Syracuse, NY. But in 2009, something new arrived: MQ-9 Reaper drones that were flown remotely over Afghanistan, dropping missiles and bombs and unleashing terror.

Organizers in Upstate New York started protests soon after the drones arrived and founded Upstate Drone Action in 2010. In 2011, one longtime activist and member of the Catholic Worker movement, Mary Anne Grady Flores, 57, joined the struggle. As part of the “Hancock 38” in April that year, she was arrested for protesting at the base’s main entrance by participating in a die-in to illustrate the indiscriminate killing of civilians overseas by drones.

She was arrested again in October 2012 for another act of “civil resistance,” as she puts it, not “civil disobedience,” to uphold the U.S. Constitution and international treaties the U.S. signed. That led to Grady Flores and the 16 others being placed under court orders restricting their protest rights. Frustrated by the protesters’ persistence, a base commander, Col. Earl Evans, sought and received an orders of protection — usually reserved for domestic violence victims — which was used over time to bar approximately 50 protesters from the base’s grounds.

In February 2013, Grady Flores stood in the public intersection beyond the driveway leading to the air base taking pictures of the eight protesters participating in an Ash Wednesday action. Those witnessing were asking for forgiveness for what we as American citizens are doing with killer drones. She was later arrested across the street and down the road for “violating the order of protection.” A higher court has found the use of the order invalid.

But on July 10, DeWitt Town Court Judge David Gideon gave Grady Flores the maximum sentence of one year in jail for a second-degree criminal contempt charge, leaving a courtroom of supporters in shock. He defended his harsh sentence by claiming that she “would simply thumb her nose at the law once again.” DeWitt Town judges are planning on holding 20 upcoming trials from August 2014 through 2015, threatening to send each activist to one year in jail.

On Wednesday, July 23, eight protesters went back to the air base to issue their own “people’s order of protection” on behalf of drone victims around the world. Seven were arrested and charged with trespass. Two of the protesters — Grady Flores’ sister Clare and Martha Hennessey, granddaughter of Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic Worker — were charged with violating their orders of protection and are being held on $10,000 bail. All of them refuse to post bail and remain in jail pending their Aug. 6 court dates.

“These judges are out to try to stop the protests on behalf of the base,” Grady Flores said, who is out on $5,000 bail pending her appeal.

Grady Flores spoke to AlterNet about what motivates her to protest against drones, the connections she sees between our foreign and domestic policies, and what gives her hope.

Alyssa Figueroa: You joined these anti-drone protests in 2011. What made you start?

Mary Anne Grady Flores: Drones are a critical issue for people in the countries that are under attack, and it’s important for those of us in the States to make the connections between poverty, racism and colonialism. As many black and Native feminists have pointed out, the violence that has historically and continues to be perpetrated inside the so-called borders of the United States sustains American imperialism abroad.