67-year-old albatross Wisdom, video


This video from Midway atoll in the Pacific says about itself:

This 67-Year-Old Bird Could Be The Oldest In The World | BBC Earth

This albatross is affectionately known as Wisdom, and is the oldest known bird in the wild.

67-Year-Old Albatross Wisdom Hatches Chick


This video from Midway island in the Pacific says about itself:

No Spring Chicken: 67-Year-Old [Laysan] Albatross [called Wisdom] Hatches Chick | Nat Geo Wild

28 February 2018

At 67 years old, the world’s oldest known wild bird hatched a new chick.

World’s oldest albatross lays egg


This video says about itself:

19 February 2016

World renowned oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle reflects on the incredible connection between a Laysan albatross named Wisdom, the oldest known bird in the world, and the Worldwide Voyage of Hōkūle‘a, as both have traveled countless thousands of miles over the last several decades.

From the South China Morning Post:

Wisdom, the oldest known seabird, lays an egg at 66

PUBLISHED : Sunday, 11 December, 2016, 3:09pm
UPDATED : Sunday, 11 December, 2016, 9:38pm

The world’s oldest known seabird is expecting.

The Laysan albatross known as Wisdom – a bird thought to be at least 66 years old – is incubating an egg once again, putting her on track to become the oldest breeding wild bird in the world.

Charlie Pelizza, the US Fish and Wildlife Service project leader at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, in the middle of the North Pacific Ocean, said that Wisdom has been returning there for six decades.

“The staff was abuzz with the news that Wisdom was back and incubating,” he said.

The bird was first banded in 1956. Since 2006 she has fledged at least nine chicks, and travelled some three million miles over the course of her life.

Her mate, Akeakamai, was seen near their nest site on November 23.

The Midway Atoll National Wildlife Reserve is home to the world’s largest albatross colony.

Park staff had thought Wisdom might take a year off from breeding, as many albatrosses must take time to molt and replenish their plumage.

The birds spend almost 90 per cent of their lives flying, travelling thousands of miles every year looking for food.

There’s an estimated 3 million breeding birds year-round at the Midway Atoll refuge.

Seabirds eat plastic smelling like food


This January 2020 video from the USA is called #BringBirdsBack – Use Less Plastic.

Another video used to say about itself:

When birds eats plastic!! (Shocking video)

19 February 2013

Midway Island is an uninhabited island about 2000 km from any other coast line. It lies roughly equidistant between North America and Asia, and almost halfway around the world from England.

If you think that throwing away that plastic bottle or piece of rubbish, can’t possibly be doing any harm, then watch this clip and think again.

From Science News:

Ocean plastic emits chemical that tricks seabirds into eating trash

by Laurel Hamers

2:00pm, November 9, 2016

Plastic smells like supper for some seabirds. When the ubiquitous material ends up in the ocean, it gives off a chemical that albatrosses, petrels and shearwaters often use to locate food, researchers report online November 9 in Science Advances. That might lead the birds to ingest harmful junk instead of a real meal.

Researchers let small beads of three common plastics linger off the coast of California. After a couple of weeks, the once-clean plastic accumulated grit, grime and bacteria that gave off an odiferous gas called dimethyl sulfide. Phytoplankton gives off the same gas, and certain seabirds use its odor as a cue that dinner is nearby. Birds that rely more heavily on dimethyl sulfide as a beacon for a nearby meal are more likely to ingest plastic than birds that don’t, the team found. And other plankton-feeding marine animals could also be fooled.

We’re proud to present ‘The ‘Seabird’ Bulletin’ – a special summer edition of our regular news brief, ‘The Bird Bulletin’. Throughout June, we chronicled the high seas adventures of our Marine Conservation Officer, Marguerite Tarzia aboard the RSS Discovery on its ‘Journey to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge’ – read the highlights from Marguerite and her fellow crewmates here!

Wisdom, oldest albatross, returns to Midway Atoll


This video says about itself:

Egg Laid By World’s Oldest Banded Wild Albatross

18 December 2014

Wisdom, a 63-year-old Laysan albatross living in Hawaii, has lain yet another egg.

Wisdom, a Laysan albatross estimated to be around 63 years old, has laid yet another egg at her home on an atoll about 1200 miles northwest of Honolulu.

She is the oldest known banded bird living in the wild, and is believed to have already raised about 35 offspring.

Mating and child rearing isn’t a casual affair among the species.

Only one egg is laid at a time, so it’s particularly important that everything goes well.

Males and females couple for life, and once the egg is produced they share in the early incubation responsibilities.

It’s an all or nothing process, as if something goes awry and the shelled embryo doesn’t make it, there will not be another attempt until the mating season rolls around again in the following year.

If it does succeed, a great deal of time is spent preparing the little one to go and live on its own.

The whole process takes about a year.

Wisdom has enjoyed a phenomenal chick survival rate in recent years, with 8 of her 9 most recent attempts being successful.

Officials from the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge are anticipating that the latest will emerge in early February.

From the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Region:

Something to be thankful for – Wisdom has returned to Midway Atoll!

Wisdom, a Laysan albatross and, the world’s oldest known banded bird in the wild has returned to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. On November 19 and just in time for the special day of giving thanks, almost a year to the day she returned last year, Wisdom was spotted with her mate among the world’s largest nesting albatross colony.

“In the face of dramatic seabird population decreases worldwide –70% drop since the 1950’s when Wisdom was first banded–Wisdom has become a symbol of hope and inspiration,” said Refuge Manager, Dan Clark.” We are a part of the fate of Wisdom and it is gratifying to see her return because of the decades of hard work conducted to manage and protect albatross nesting habitat.”

“Wisdom left soon after mating but we expect her back any day now to lay her egg,” noted Deputy Refuge Manager, Bret Wolfe. “It is very humbling to think that she has been visiting Midway for at least 64 years. Navy sailors and their families likely walked by her not knowing she could possibly be rearing a chick over 50 years later. She represents a connection to Midway’s past as well as embodying our hope for the future.”

Wisdom was first banded in 1956. And because Laysan albatross do not return to breed until they are at least five years old, it is estimated Wisdom is at least 64 years old, but she could be older. Many birds lose their bands before they can be replaced. Wisdom’s bands, however, were continuously replaced and because of meticulous record keeping associated with bird banding, we can verify she is the same bird first banded by noted author and Service ornithologist, Chandler Robbins. Biologists may find even older birds as old worn bands continue to be routinely replaced.

Although Laysan albatrosses typically mate for life, Wisdom has likely had more than one mate and has raised as many as 36 chicks. Laying only one egg per year, a breeding albatross and their mate will spend approximately six months rearing and feeding their young. When not tending to their chicks, albatross forage hundreds of miles out at sea periodically returning with meals of squid or flying fish eggs. Wisdom has likely clocked over six million ocean miles of flight time.

November 25, 2015

Boom! Wisdom, the world’s oldest known wild bird has laid an egg! Wisdom is a 67 year old Laysan albatross from the Midway Atoll: here.

Albatross, petrel egg sizes, new research


This video says about itself:

Egg Laid By World’s Oldest Banded Wild Albatross

18 December 2014

Wisdom, a 63-year-old Laysan albatross living in Hawaii, has lain yet another egg.

Wisdom, a Laysan albatross estimated to be around 63 years old, has laid yet another egg at her home on an atoll about 1200 miles northwest of Honolulu.

She is the oldest known banded bird living in the wild, and is believed to have already raised about 35 offspring.

Mating and child rearing isn’t a casual affair among the species.

Only one egg is laid at a time, so it’s particularly important that everything goes well.

Males and females couple for life, and once the egg is produced they share in the early incubation responsibilities.

It’s an all or nothing process, as if something goes awry and the shelled embryo doesn’t make it, there will not be another attempt until the mating season rolls around again in the following year.

If it does succeed, a great deal of time is spent preparing the little one to go and live on its own.

The whole process takes about a year.

Wisdom has enjoyed a phenomenal chick survival rate in recent years, with 8 of her 9 most recent attempts being successful.

Officials from the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge are anticipating that the latest will emerge in early February.

From the Canadian Journal of Zoology:

Does feeding zone influence egg size in slow-breeding seabirds?

F. Stephen Dobson, Pierre Jouventin

20 June 2015

Abstract

In several bird species, mothers that endow their eggs with additional resources benefit from more rapid development and more robust offspring. We examined egg size and associated life-history traits in 44 species of the slow-breeding procellariiform seabirds (albatrosses and petrels).

The far distant foraging of some of the species should subject them to difficult ecological conditions and perhaps delays in return to the nest. Such delays might lead to poorer egg care by the remaining parent. To compensate, we predicted a positive association of egg size with foraging zone (offshore, near pelagic, far pelagic), and both with the length of incubation shifts.

We tested this hypothesis and also examined egg size and fitness-related reproductive traits. Egg size scaled significantly and tightly with female body mass (β = 0.72, R2 = 0.98). After influences of both size and phylogeny were removed, however, egg size was positively and significantly associated with both mean length of incubation shift and feeding zone (r = 0.45 and 0.46, respectively), perhaps indicating a life-history syndrome of egg size, incubation, and distance that species go to forage during the breeding season, and supporting the compensation hypothesis.

Laysan albatross nest on webcam again


This video says about itself:

Midway Atoll, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, North Pacific Ocean.

May 8, 2010.

Two non-breeding Laysan albatrosses perform an intricate courtship dance with Midway Atoll‘s turquoise lagoon serving as backdrop. The earsplitting whistles, braying, rooster-like crows and bill clacking you will hear are all part of Laysan albatrosses‘ wonderful dance. The birds’ courting episodes can last for hours, even being performed through the night.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA today:

The Albatrosses of Kauai Return

Just in time for the first eggs to begin hatching, our Kauai Laysan Albatross cam returns. This year, we’ve upgraded the cam to include infrared illumination for nighttime viewing, and two albatross nests will be visible from the camera!

Last year’s pair, Kaluakane and Kaluahine, continue to nest onsite, but are far from the area that the camera can access. This year you’ll get to know two new albatross families on screen. The parents of the nest in front of the cam under the palm tree are mom Malumalu (band number K312) and dad Ko’olau (KP975); they are the parents of Mango, the young albatross who shared the limelight with Kaloakulua on last year’s Albatross Cam. The parents of the distant nest under the banana tree are dad Akamai (K039) and mom Ala (A379). As with last year, each of the adults has been given a name by a native Hawaiian kumu, or teacher (learn more about their names).

Both nests’ eggs will likely hatch over the next 7 to 10 days—don’t miss out on being among a select few who have ever watched a Laysan Albatross enter the world! Watch live.