Long-tailed duck, new species for Dearborn, USA


This is a long-tailed duck video.

From the blog of the Rouge River Bird Observatory at the University of Michigan-Dearborn in the USA:

Monday, March 2, 2015

Dearborn adds another new species!

On 1 March 2015, Larry Urbanski found a Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) in the Rouge River near the Ford Rouge Plant. There is a photo attached to his eBird checklist (sign in may be required for one or both links) and the bird appears to be a male.

Mike O’Leary and I attempted to locate the bird this morning, and found a Long-tailed Duck that appears to be a female, or at least doesn’t look like the bird found yesterday. …

Long-tailed Duck is the 260th species on the Dearborn list.

Most of the Rouge River is still frozen solid. The areas in the Ford Rouge boat slip and adjacent waters stay open all year. Other waterfowl present included a couple hundred Common Mergansers, at least 24 Red-breasted Mergansers, Canvasbacks, a few Ruddy Ducks, Common Goldeneye, Redheads, and Greater Scaup. There were at least 20 Great Black-backed Gulls — a species not recorded in Dearborn until 1987. Ten sort of miserable looking Great Blue Herons hugged the shoreline, as did 10 Black-crowned Night-herons. There is a small pond inside the plant next to the river that accepts warm-water discharge from one of the steel mill facilities, and a bunch of night-herons have wintered there for years.

Many thanks to Larry Urbanski for this great find.

Posted by Julie Craves.

Mastodon discovery in Michigan backyard


This video from the USA says about itself:

Bachelor party makes rare mastodon fossil discovery

13 June 2014

People at a bachelor party on a lake shore in New Mexico stumbled upon a rare fossil: the skull of a mastodon. It is considered to be an ancient elephant, complete with tusks and teeth. Scott Pelley reports.

From Popular Science in the USA today:

These Guys Found The Remains Of A 14,000-Year-Old Butchered Mastodon In Their Backyard

Mastodon burgers anyone?

By Mary Beth Griggs

Posted 39 minutes ago

It isn’t every day that you find bones in your backyard, much less a 4-foot long rib bone sticking out of the earth. After that initial, massive find, neighbors Daniel LaPoint Jr. and Eric Witzke kept digging, eventually unearthing 42 massive bones from a property in Bellevue Township, Michigan last November. At first, they thought the bones might have belonged to a dinosaur, but it turns out that the remains were far younger.

“Preliminary examination indicates that the animal may have been butchered by humans,” Daniel Fisher, director of the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology told the Lansing State Journal. Fisher examined the bones when LaPoint and Witzke contacted the museum, and eventually determined that in addition to being butchered by humans, the bones belonged to a 37-year-old mastodon (a relative of elephants and mammoths) that lived roughly 14,000 years ago.

The Journal reports that while unusual, finding the bones of mastodons isn’t totally unheard of in Michigan; about 330 sites have been confirmed around the state, two in the past year.

Fossils found on private land in the United States belong to the landowner, not the government, so the fossil finders LaPoint and Witzke are keeping a few of the bones as the coolest mementoes ever and donating the rest to the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology. But before they travelled to the museum, the pair took the bones to a local school, where kids got to experience the fossils up close and personal.

“All the kids got to pick them up and hold them. Some kids, it was life-changing for them. To change one kid’s life because they got to touch it, I think, is an incredible opportunity.” LaPoint told the Lansing State Journal.

See also here.

Bat discovery in Michigan, USA


This video says about itself:

BAT SENSE – by Nature Video

This stunning slow motion footage shows how bats use echolocation to find water. We know how bats echolocate to hunt insects, but this is the first study to show how they recognise large, flat objects like ponds. Moreover, by testing young bats that had never encountered a pond or river before, the researchers showed that bats seem to have a built-in ability to recognize these important features of their environment. Read the original research paper here.

By Lindsay Knake in the USA:

Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge study finds two new bat species

November 13, 2013 at 10:31 AM

JAMES TOWNSHIP, MI — Two new bat species are visiting the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge in Saginaw County.

Employees of the federal wildlife network and Eastern Michigan University staff found the hoary bat and red bat during an exploratory survey to see what types of bats are in the refuge and how abundant they are.

The study located 229 bats, including 222 big brown bats, four red bats, three hoary bats and two little brown bats.

Hoary bats are the most common in North America and have a body about the size of a mouse, according to the University of Michigan Museum of Zoology.

Red bats live in habitats with sparse human population, according to U-M.

Although little brown bats once were the most populous bat species at the refuge, a fungus called white nose syndrome has killed most of the little brown bats, according to refuge employees.