British art on the ‘war on terror’

This video from Britain says about itself:

3 March 2013

Step behind the scenes and get a glimpse of the thinking motivating the digital world’s greatest artists, filmmakers, thinkers and doers with the Lighthouse Monthly Talks. Award winning artist, Edmund Clark, was our November 2012 speaker.

As part of our Brighton Photo Biennial 2012, we were extremely pleased to have BPB12 artist and 2012 Prix Pictet nominee, Edmund Clark speaking at Lighthouse. Clark discussed his practice, which explored modes of control, living under conditions of surveillance, censorship and representation. His latest work experiments with how multidisciplinary collaboration and new technology can further address these themes. Clark’s exhibition, Control Order House is on at the University of Brighton Gallery.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

An atrocity exhibition

Saturday 20th August 2016

A new show at the Imperial War Museum is a grim reminder of the consequences for those perceived to be a terrorist threat by increasingly authoritarian states

LONDON’S Imperial War Museum has an outstanding track record in staging hard-hitting exhibitions, with Peter Kennard’s photo-montages and Edward Barber’s documentary photographs being two very recent examples.

Added to the roster is this disturbing new show of work by award-winning artist Edmund Clark. War of Terror, which runs until August next year, focuses on the measures states take to counter perceived terrorist threats and the malign impact they have on all our lives and explores the experience of people in Britain suspected — but never convicted — of terrorist-related offences in the interminable “war on terror.”

Clark says: “A vital challenge for today’s visual artists and photographers is how to explore new and unseen processes of contemporary conflict.

“My work engages with state censorship and control to find new visual strategies to try and achieve this and to reconfigure subjects we normally see as distant or threatening stereotypes on our screens.”

His personal contribution to the debate around those issues is a series of photographs, film and documents, some never previously exhibited.

They explore hidden experiences of state control and address the issues of security, secrecy, legality and ethics which they raise.

Clark’s most recent work Negative Publicity: Artefacts of Extraordinary Rendition, created in collaboration with counter-terrorism investigator Crofton Black, explores the experiences of those secretly detained and transferred without legal process to US custody for further detention and interrogation.

Guantanamo: If The Light Goes Out offers an uneasy contrast between living spaces at Guantanamo and the homes of former British detainees who were released without charge, while Letters to Omar features reproductions of censored correspondence sent to Omar Deghayes, a British detainee at Guantanamo, and later made available to Clark.

Cards and letters sent to him by people from around the world, most of them strangers, were scanned and redacted by military censors.

When and in what form Deghayes received the correspondence was part of the control exercised over him. Created by the bureaucratic processes of Guantanamo, these fragmentary reproductions added to his sense of paranoia.

Equally disturbing is the installation Control Order House. In December 2011 and January 2012, Clark was given exclusive access to a suburban house in England in which a British man suspected of involvement in terrorist-related activity was living under the terms of a Home Office enforced control order — a form of detention without trial based on secret evidence.

The installation contains nearly 500 photographs of the house in the order in which he took them. Two video sequences, on display for the first time, convey the tension, claustrophobia and monotony of a controlled person’s life, while documents, architectural plans and photographs reveal further details of life under a control order.

As an exhibition exploring the complexities of modern asymmetric warfare and its implications for human rights, this is a must-see.

The exhibition is free and runs until August 28 2017, opening times:

Anton Chekhov on stage in London, England

This video from the USA says about itself:

The Seagull – 1975 – Anton Chekhov – John J. Desmond – Blythe Danner – Frank Langella

A group of friends and relations gather at a country estate to see the first performance of an experimental play written and staged by the young man of the house, Konstantin (Frank Langella), an aspiring writer who dreams of bringing new forms to the theatre.

By Jack Dunleavy in England:

Vivid and artful

Tuesday 9th August 2016

An Anton Chekhov marathon leaves Jack Dunleavy emotionally battered but deeply satisfied by the experience

Young Chekhov: Platonov, Ivanov, The Seagull
National Theatre, London SE1

What’s more daunting, seeing three plays in one day or paying £150 to do so?

Young Chekhov at the National Theatre takes this question as its secret theme.

In a new version David Hare explores the shortcomings of art and love, the importance of money and the perils of boredom.

The protagonists in Anton Chekhov’s early work are a trio of manchildren, each going through a different kind of quarter-life crisis.

In Platonov, the title character has more women on his plate than he can handle. James McArdle is excellent in the main role, armed with the pick-up artist’s weapons of choice from Casanova to The Game — flouncy shirt, big boots and plenty to drink. Whether he’s lying to a lover or just lying on the floor drunk, Platonov is exasperatingly forgivable.

Play number two, Ivanov, is about a penniless landowner who can’t bear the company of anyone he knows, most of all his consumptive wife (Nina Sosanya).

Chekhov’s signature flickering between comedy and tragedy is pulled off excellently in Platonov, but jars a little in this one.

Geoffrey Streatfeild is so convincingly miserable as Nikolai Ivanov that the laughs are generated more often from farce than wit.

The day builds to a climax with The Seagull, Chekhov’s first real masterpiece.

This is a story about endless struggles — old art and new, one generation and the next, the sexes, cities and the country.

To no-one’s surprise Anna Chancellor gives the standout performance of the entire day as Arkadina, the once-famous actor and mother of avant-garde playwright and nervous wreck Konstantin (Joshua Jones).

Chancellor serves a cocktail of ego, magnetism and just a slice of panic. True to her character, she demands the audience’s attention and praise even in the background.

Is it worth the time and money? The plays don’t necessarily end when the curtain comes down. Part of the fun is how the Chekhovian spirit seeps throughout the intervals and into the next production.

Chekhov’s world isn’t the happiest place to spend the day, but it is vivid and artful. His protagonists may destroy themselves by questioning their place in life, but for nine hours in the Olivier theatre the audience knows they’ve come to the right place.

Runs until October 8 2016. Box Office: (020) 7452-3000

British Blairite anti-Corbyn coup’s links to anti-women Jack the Ripper museum

This August 2015 video from London, England is called Jack the Ripper Museum Protest.

By Lamiat Sabin in Britain:

Eagle Diversity Guru Linked to Murderous Museum

Tuesday 19th July 2016

Linda Riley was director of Ripper firms

LABOUR leadership candidate Angela Eagle’s diversity guru had links to the notorious Jack the Ripper museum in Cable Street, the Morning Star can reveal today.

This is while Ms Eagle pitches herself as the “working-class woman” candidate during this week’s Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) hustings to garner approval ahead of the leadership election.

The Wallasey MP and rival Owen Smith, MP for Pontypridd, resigned from the shadow cabinet as part of an attempted coup against Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Corporate adviser Linda Riley was appointed by the Labour Party in April to aid then-shadow business secretary Ms Eagle and act as a representative to firms on equality-related matters.

She was also pictured standing in the front row in support of her leadership campaign event last week.

But Ms Riley was previously involved in two companies with the founder of the notorious Jack the Ripper museum on Cable Street in London’s East End.

Ms Riley was a director of the now-dissolved firms Jack the Ripper Museum Ltd and Museum of Jack the Ripper Ltd, along with former Google diversity chief Mark Palmer-Edgecumbe.

Those companies shut down in March and August 2014, but Mr Palmer-Edgecumbe went on to open the museum itself in August 2015 under a new company, Jack the Ripper Museum (London) Ltd.

The museum has been accused of “glorifying” serial killings of working-class women in east London and was targeted by protesters as the original plans submitted to Tower Hamlets council suggested it would be a museum of women’s history.

Mr Palmer-Edgecumbe defended his museum, saying it was meant to “seriously examine” the crimes within the social context of the 1880s.

Ms Riley declined to describe her views on the museum.

LSE academic and Class War activist Lisa Mckenzie, who has protested against the museum, told the Morning Star it was “a disgrace” that “self-styled diversity gurus Riley and Palmer-Edgecumbe have constantly ignored the distress this ‘museum’ has caused the local community.”

She added: “The day Angela Eagle announced her friend Linda Riley’s appointment, I was shocked that such a person is constantly being given chances to ride roughshod over people’s concerns. This shows very poor judgement by Eagle.”

Ms Eagle’s parliamentary office did not respond to a request for comment.

Jeremy Corbyn increases dominant lead over Angela Eagle and Owen Smith among Labour Party members, poll finds. 54% of party members surveryed would give first preference to current Labour leader: here.

European eel life cycle video

This video from the Zoological Society of London in England says about itself:

The Amazing Life Cycle of the European Eel

1 July 2015

Find out about the incredible life cycle of the Critically Endangered European eel and their amazing migration.

ZSL has been working to conserve these iconic London inhabitants as part of our Tidal Thames Conservation Project for the past 10 years. Find out more about that work here.