Stop slavery in Libya, The Hague, 18 December


This 24 November 2017 video is called The football world did not remain silent on slave trade in Libya.

From In-EUmanity Amsterdam and No Border Network in the Netherlands:

Monday 18 December 2017 14:00 till 16:00

Europahuis, Korte Vijverberg 5/6 2513 AB The Hague

Stop Europe Funding Slavery in Libya: Stop Wars on Migrants

We are going to organize action days against European funding of atrocities in Libya.

In Libya, everyday migrants are imprisoned in private detention centers, tortured and sold as slaves. They suffer extreme exploitation and violence.

Europe [rather: the European Union] is funding the expansion of these detention centers. Meanwhile by implementing the Malta agreement, Europe is training and technically supplying the Libyan “coastguard” to carry out illegal refoulements that they call “rescue operations”.

We stand up against the criminal regime of Fortress Europe.

We demand the immediate cessation of the funding of the Libyan torturers.

End slavery and detention in Libya.

Free passage, healthcare and protection to all the victims of torture and trafficking.

Common Day of Action on the 18th of December, International Day of Migrants

A video of the demonstration is here. One of the speeches is here.

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European Union helps torturing refugees in Libya


This video says about itself:

Libya’s slave trade – ‘They sell Africans over there’

28 November 2017

The world’s most vulnerable, fleeing war and poverty back home, are being abused and auctioned off as slaves – a shocking danger facing migrants and refugees in Libya.

It has been reported that hundreds of people are being auctioned in modern day slave markets in Libya for as little as $400.

Libya is the main transit hub for refugees and migrants attempting to reach southern Europe by sea. They are coming from countries like Nigeria, Eritrea, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Senegal, Sudan and Somalia.

The power vacuum in Libya after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi has made human trafficking and people smuggling a booming trade.

And the European Union’s renewed strategy to stop migrants and refugees travelling across the Mediterranean has led to more people being stuck in the north African country without money or food.

Al Jazeera’s Bernard Smith reports.

By Alex Lantier:

Amnesty International report exposes EU role in mass torture of refugees in Libya

13 December 2017

In order to keep masses of refugees from reaching Europe, the European Union (EU) is helping build, fund and equip a vast network of prison camps in which refugees are arbitrarily detained, beaten, tortured, sexually assaulted, sold into slavery and murdered. This is the conclusion of a harrowing Amnesty International (AI) report published yesterday, titled “Libya’s Dark Web of Collusion.”

The horrific abuses detailed in the AI report are already well known. Protests erupted in North Africa, France and worldwide last month, after CNN broadcast videos of human traffickers selling refugees into slavery in Libya. However, AI’s extensively documented report, based on government documents and dozens of interviews with refugees, underscores not only the vast scope of this barbaric prison system, but the key role of EU technical and financial support.

Moreover, while the AI report says very little about NATO’s 2011 war in Libya, it makes clear that the origins of this prison system lie in the wave of imperialist wars across the Middle East and Africa and the ensuing global refugee crisis. The people-smugglers that operate prison camps in Libya are mostly militias that NATO backed against Gaddafi during the war, and that took power after NATO destroyed the Gaddafi regime.

This is a devastating indictment of the pundits, academics and pseudo left parties like France’s New Anti-capitalist Party or the International Socialist Organization in the United States that hailed the war in Libya as a humanitarian intervention to aid a democratic revolution. While they claimed that imperialist war would bring democracy and freedom to Libya, it brought slavery, rape and murder.

According to International Organization on Migration (IOM) statistics cited by AI, at least 416,556 refugees were trapped in Libya in September 2017. Of these, over 60 percent are from sub-Saharan Africa, 32 percent are from North Africa, and 7 percent from Asia and the Middle East. The EU is working with militias and criminal gangs to keep them in Libya.

The strategy was codified in the February 2017 Malta Declaration, in which the EU endorsed and vowed to support Italian cooperation with Libyan authorities against refugees. This involved funding, training and arming border guards and the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) to block refugee departures, and “upgrading and financing” so-called “reception centres” where refugees captured by the LCG are detained. Also, AI notes, the EU has “struck deals with Libyan local authorities and the leaders of tribes and armed groups—to encourage them to stop the smuggling of people.”

As a result, AI notes, refugee departures from Libya are collapsing: “In the first semester of 2017 a total of 83,754 people had reached Italy by sea, a significant increase over the same period in 2016, when 70,222 arrivals were recorded. However, the trend then changed dramatically: between July and November 2017 a total of 33,288 refugees and migrants arrived in Italy, 67 percent fewer than in the same period of 2016, when 102,786 arrived.”

With EU assistance, tens of thousands of refugees are being thrown into prison camps where they are subjected to beatings, torture and murder. Currently, AI writes, “about 20,000 refugees and migrants are detained in centres normally managed by the General Directorate for Combating Illegal Migration (DCIM)”, an EU-funded branch of the Libyan Interior Ministry. As Libya does not have a functioning judicial system since Gaddafi’s overthrow, AI adds, refugees are “deprived of any formal administrative or judicial means of challenging their detention.”

AI cites testimony from many refugees who escaped to Italy from camps in Libya. Mariam from Eritrea said the guards “were hard; they were drunk all the time. Then one day there were four Somalis who tried to escape. The Eritrean smugglers told us they killed them, three of them; the fourth [was] in the hospital.

“Then they beat the rest of the Somalis. [They were] getting tortured; you could hear the screaming. They used electricity and beat them with Kalashnikov [rifles].”

Samir from Sudan described how he escaped from the DCIM’s Nasser detention center, but his friends did not and were sold into debt bondage: “The electricity was out and there was no water, so they took us outside to gather water. Me and two other friends—we ran; they shot after us but we were fast. … The other three were bailed out by the Sudanese man and they have to work to pay off 4,500 Libyan dinars to the factory owner.”

Ousman from Gambia described a DCIM detention center in Tripoli: “I saw many people dying in prison, either because they fell sick or were beaten … Guards were Libyan—they used to beat everybody, without a reason. Before entering the prison, police search you and take away all money, phone, everything.” He added, “I saw one boy in the prison—they gave him a phone to call his family, and they beat him with a metal stick while [he was] on the phone, on arms and everywhere…after five months I escaped with other people, but the guards started shooting and many were killed. I don’t now how many were killed, but I saw some falling and screaming.”

Mohamed, a Bangladeshi steelworker living in Libya, said: “A group of Libyans came in the shop one day and said they had work for us. Three of us went with them. There were three of them. We got in the car with them. They told me to put my head down, and not look; they became aggressive. They took us to a place, next to a factory. When they took us inside, there were about 500 people, it was one big place filled with people. … They beat me with a metal rod; it broke my fingers [he showed deformed fingers on his right hand]. I have problems with my right leg also and my shoulder because of the beating. One guy was beaten to death in front of my eyes. I stayed there for 20 days. I then paid 2,000 US dollars to get out; my friends managed to collect the money.”

The NATO war in Libya and the country’s ensuing collapse into a bloody civil war are searing lessons in the reactionary role of imperialism. The EU’s foreign policy has emerged from the Libyan war completely criminalized, using the most barbaric methods to deny refugees’ right to asylum. The EU is complicit in the torture of refugees not only in that it provides support to DCIM to operate its semi-official prison camps in Libya; EU naval aid to train and arm the LCG, as well as deals cut with various regional or local militias that control prison facilities, also play a key role.

AI explains, “The LCG’s increased capacity, due to support from EU member states, has led to an increasing number of such pull-back operations. So far in 2017, 19,452 people have been intercepted by LCG and taken back to Libya. When the LCG intercept boats at sea, they bring refugees and migrants back to Libyan shores and routinely transfer them to DCIM detention centres.”

AI singled out a particular deal between Italy, the former colonial power, and influential warlord Khalifa Haftar: “Italian government representatives also discussed measures to reduce irregular migratory movements with Khalifa Haftar, the head of the self-styled Libyan National Army, which controls the east of the country. Haftar visited Italy on 26 September 2017 to meet with the Italian Ministers of Interior and Defence.”

Militarism and crackdown on refugees dominate EU summit: here.

From NATO war to Libyan slavery


This video says about itself:

Should NATO Answer for Libya’s Slave Trade?

2 December 2017

CNN has revealed that African migrants are being sold at slave auctions in Libya for as little as $400. As the UN weighs sanctions, professor and author Horace Campbell says the NATO powers who tore Libya apart should own up to their responsibility.

As EU policies drive migrants away, Libyan authorities push them into dire detention centres. For some who reach Europe, it is worth the risk: here.

Libyan hell for African refugees


This video says about itself:

SLAVE TRADE IN LIBYA | SHOCKING DOCUMENTARY

28 November 2017

KINDLY WATCH AND SHARE! SPREAD THE AWARENESS..STOP SLAVE TRADE IN LIBYA!!

I bumped into this documentary and I decided to upload it on YouTube so as to shed more light on what is going on in Libya. Ross Kemp covered this months ago and till now, no European or Western country has condemned the act. We need to stop the Slave Trade in Libya!!

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Hundreds of thousands of migrants face inhuman conditions in Libya

Friday 1st December 2017

UP TO 700,000 African migrants are suffering “inhuman” conditions in Libyan camps, African Union (AU) commission chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat said yesterday.

Mr Mahamat spoke at the end of a summit between the AU and European Union where migration was a top issue.

He said that 3,800 people in one camp in Tripoli need to be removed as soon as possible.

“That’s just one camp,” he said. “The Libyan government has told us there are 42” and some contain even more people.

Several stories about African refugees being sold at open-air slave markets in Libya have been published recently in Western media.

However, there have often been reports of black Africans being horrendously abused and killed since Nato overthrew the Libyan government in 2011, plunging the country into bloody chaos.

Oxfam said yesterday that a EU deal to support Libya’s coastguard, agreed at the joint summit, would lead to many refugees trying to reach Europe being returned to “violence and abuse” in Libya.

Libyan slavery and the European Union


This video says about itself:

The EU Silently Welcomes Slavery In Libya

1 December 2017

The European Union was awarded the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize “for over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe.”

At the same time, EU officials know that once refugees can’t make it to Europe—whether because they become enslaved in Libya or are too fearful to make the trip—they are no longer a problem for the Union.

The European Union (EU) and African Union (AU) held a joint summit November 29-30 in Abidjan in the Ivory Coast. The meeting was overshadowed by the unfolding disaster caused by imperialist wars in Libya and the Sahel region, and escalating neo-colonial interventions of the EU powers, particularly France. It brought together leaders of 50 African and European countries to concentrate on EU plans to block immigration from Africa and, without saying it openly, to undermine China’s growing influence in the continent. In the lead-up to the summit, protests erupted across Africa and in France against the barbaric treatment of African refugees by the Islamist militias controlling Libya, where CNN filmed the operations of slave markets that have re-appeared since the 2011 NATO war. After these protests, African regimes withdrew their diplomats from Tripoli. The reappearance of slavery expresses the political essence of European imperialism’s neo-colonial intervention in Africa: here.

Tortured ex-slaves in Libya interviewed


This video says about itself:

Cameroon: Migrants tell of Libya’s slave market hell

23 November 2017

Translated from Dutch NOS TV, 30 November 2017:

Slave Adaman was cut with machete to extort his family

Adaman Ouattara has huge scars on his left upper leg. The Ivorian was cut by a Libyan slave owner with a machete, to blackmail his mother to free him.

Ouattara had her on the phone while the slave owner cut him with the machete. He screamed out loud. “My mother heard that, then the money comes quickly.” …

Ouattara wanted to travel to Europe via North Africa and was already on a dinghy when he was intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard and ended up in a detention camp.

There he was bought and taken away by a trader. “We had to plant potatoes while we were constantly being held at gunpoint by a man with a kalashnikov gun.” After a month and a day he was released.

Stop Libyan slavery, The Hague demonstration


Demonstrators in the Hague against slavery in Libya, photo: Charyta Virgillia

Translated from Charyta Virgillia in the Netherlands:

Protest against slavery in Libya

Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 5:00 PM

Black refugees are held in concentration camps in Libya and even traded as slaves. When images of this European Union-encouraged policy spread last week, people across Europe went out into the streets. Similarly in The Hague last Saturday.

The protest was organized by two people who wanted to make their voice heard via Facebook, but more people joined quickly. The plan was to march from the Malieveld to the embassy of Libya, as is customary in other European countries, but this was forbidden by the mayor of The Hague. There was a lot of police, in the beginning there were more police than demonstrators.

The first speaker, Tob Juland, sang the anti-apartheid song Asimbonanga. The next speakers included Alphonse Muambi who made the link with [Dutch Prime Minister] Rutte, who in his opinion is partly responsible for this human trafficking. The Rutte-backed war in Libya in 2011 is the reason for the situation in Libya. In combination with the deals that the EU concludes with states such as Libya to stop refugees. One lady bursts into tears while speaking. She spoke French, but everyone understood her: everyone could feel her emotion, frustration, fear and anger.

Western countries rob and still destroy African countries. They do this undisturbed. Refugees want to go to Europe for a better life because of the consequences. This is one of the reasons why we can not refuse refugees: because we destroy their countries.

The [paramilitary] forces in Libya seem to be able to do what they like. For example, there are also stories about the trade in organs into which refugees are forced. How bad do the images have to be in Libya before it is stopped? Many speakers spoke out against the trade of refugees as slaves and the silence about this in the media. As one speaker said, the ass of a Dutch dog is treated even better than African youth.

Bouba Koné of the Collective of the African Diaspora in the Netherlands stated afterwards: ‘There is a front arising of African youth in the Netherlands who feel the duty to distribute information that is not covered in the mainstream media. Many white Dutch people also state that the situation in Libya can not continue. The problem, and therefore the solution, must come from two sides: from Africa itself and from countries such as the Netherlands in which established politics creates this policy.’

Protests like those last Saturday in The Hague – or the much bigger protests in Brussels and London last weekend – are necessary to draw attention to what is happening in Libya. The protests point out the EU’s responsibility for this drama: its war policy, Fortress Europe and spending money in Turkey and Libya to keep refugees outside the EU. This policy not only leads to terrible human rights violations, but also legitimizes the racism and nationalism of the extreme right.

Let your voice be heard and sign the petition of the Collective of the African Diaspora in the Netherlands (CADN).