Good African mountain gorilla news


This video says about itself:

5 November 2014

Mountain Gorilla – Full Documentary HD

The mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) is one of the two subspecies of the eastern gorilla. There are two populations. One is found in the Virunga volcanic mountains of Central Africa, within three National Parks: Mgahinga, in south-west Uganda; Volcanoes, in north-west Rwanda; and Virunga in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The other is found in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. Some primatologists consider the Bwindi population in Uganda may be a separate subspecies, though no description has been finished. As of November 2012, the estimated total number of mountain gorillas is around 880.

From the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany:

Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000

The population of mountain gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes has more than doubled in the past three decades

May 31, 2018

Summary: A recent census of the critically endangered mountain gorillas conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes found a minimum of 604 individuals. In combination with the 400 individuals living in the only other population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, these new results push the total number of wild mountain gorillas in the world to over 1000.

“This represents one of the rare success stories in conservation. The population of mountain gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes has more than doubled in the past three decades, despite intensive threats of poaching, habitat degradation, and civil conflict”, stated Martha Robbins, research scientist and gorilla expert at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. “This increase exemplifies the dedicated efforts of the governments of Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo to conserve these critically endangered great apes, and notably, the hard work of park staff on the ground. This dramatic increase also shows that extreme conservation efforts including tourism, veterinary work, and community projects can have a positive impact on one of our closest living relatives.”

The census was a combination of intensive fieldwork in 2015 and 2016 and detailed genetic analysis. Field teams walked more than 2,000 kilometres to sweep intensively through the entire 440 square kilometres Virunga Volcanoes searching for trails and nest sites left by the gorillas. Genetic analysis, taking more than 18 months to complete, was conducted on approximately 1,100 fecal samples to determine that there are a minimum of 186 unhabituated (not regularly contacted by humans) gorillas. The remaining 70 percent of the population consists of 418 gorillas that are habituated for research and tourism.

The last census conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes was in 2010, when the population was estimated to be a minimum of 480 gorillas. The current figure represents a 26 percent increase in the number of gorillas over a six-year-period, which is a 3.8 percent annual rate of increase. This increase is due to improved methods used in this recent census as well as actual growth of the population. The 604 gorillas were found in 41 social groups and 14 solitary males.

Conducting the census was a large collaborative effort among the park services of the three countries where mountain gorillas live, namely Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo, several non-governmental conservation organizations, and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Routine censusing such as this one is a crucial part of adaptive management strategies to help determine whether a population is increasing or decreasing in size and decide if conservation efforts are effective or should be modified. The population of mountain gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes numbered only about 250 gorillas in the mid-1980’s.

“Genetic analysis of DNA from fecal samples allows us to count gorillas without even observing them,” observes Linda Vigilant, head of the primatology genetics lab in Leipzig. “Next we will be analyzing the detection history of individuals over time to get more insights into how groups form and group membership changes.”

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Gorillas crossing road, video


This video from Africa says about itself:

Silverback gorilla stops traffic to cross road – Gorilla Family and Me – BBC Earth

29 December 2017

This silverback gorilla causes the road to come to a standstill when his family needs to cross it.

Mountain gorillas in Rwanda


This video says about itself:

25 September 2017

Follow along as National Geographic photographer Ronan Donovan hikes through Volcanoes National Park in northwestern Rwanda in search of Dian Fossey’s famed [mountain] gorillas.

Fuel efficient stoves reduce tree cutting in Rwanda forest: here.

Dian Fossey on gorillas, video


This video says about itself:

Dian Fossey Narrates Her Life With Gorillas in This Vintage Footage | National Geographic

11 September 2017

The 1973 National Geographic film The Mountain Gorilla documented zoologist Dian Fossey’s study of and interaction with the great apes of Central Africa from 1967 to 1972.

Save gorillas in Nigeria, petition


This 2012 video is called Cross River Gorillas, Endangered, Caught on Camera.

From the Wildlife Conservation Society:

At any minute, bulldozers could plow through one of the last rainforests in Nigeria.

As the heavy machinery tears its way through thousands of acres of lush, ancient forest, they will demolish some of the only remaining habitat of the highly endangered Cross River gorilla.

There are just 300 Cross River gorillas left in the wild – they might not survive a blow like this.

Help protect the last Cross River gorillas: sign the petition to stop destructive superhighway construction.

For thousands of years, the Ekuri people have lived in and worked cooperatively to maintain this beautiful rainforest – one of the last remaining in densely populated Nigeria. But now Cross River State Governor Ben Ayade has plans to build a massive superhighway that would destroy this precious wild place.

Cutting through the heart of Cross River State, it would destroy a national park, adjoining forest reserves, indigenous communities, and vulnerable wildlife. What’s worse, the plans call for approximately 6 miles of “buffer” on either side.

To put this in perspective, the average Nigerian interstate highway has approximately 300 feet of buffer on either side. That means that a 12-mile swath of ancient forest, extending the entire length of the 160-mile highway – 100 times the usual area – will be bulldozed for absolutely no reason.

Governor Ayade is pushing hard for construction to start immediately but Nigeria’s federal government has the power to protect this land. Please, sign the petition to Nigeria’s President Buhari and help stop the Cross River State superhighway before it’s too late for this precious rainforest, the Ekuri people, and wildlife like gorillas, elephants, and chimpanzees.

I know you care about wildlife and wild places, which is why I’m writing you about this urgent crisis.

The superhighway would annihilate the habitat of hundreds of endangered and vulnerable species, including many found nowhere else on earth. And the livelihood of 180 indigenous communities will be completely destroyed. A powerful movement is building to stop it. The Ekuri Initiative has already organized the support of 253,000 people to take action to protect their forests – will you add your voice before it’s too late?

Thank you for all that you do to protect wildlife and wild places around the world.

Sincerely,

John F. Calvelli
Executive Vice President, Public Affairs
Wildlife Conservation Society

Irreplaceable – Cross River National Park, Nigeria. By BirdLife News, 8 Nov 2016: here.

Ray of hope for endangered Cross River Gorilla in West Africa Forest: here.

Rare Cross River gorilla still faces serious threat: here.

David Attenborough about gorillas, video


This BBC video from Britain says about itself:

Attenborough Talks About His Famous Gorilla Encounter – Attenborough at 90

11 May 2016

Sir David Attenborough remembers his groundbreaking series Life On Earth and that extraordinary moment where he got to interact with Gorillas.