German discrimination against east European refugees


Nuremberg swastika vandalism

This recent photo is from Nuremberg in Bavaria in Germany, where Hitler’s nazi party used to have their mass meetings. A building intended for refugees has been vandalized with a nazi swastika and an anti-refugee slogan.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Bavaria will house Eastern European asylum seekers separately

Today, 12:16

The government in the southern German state of Bavaria has decided that refugees from Serbia, Macedonia and Albania should now be housed in separate centers for asylum seekers. There they should hear within two weeks whether they are allowed to stay or not.

Nearly 50 per cent of asylum seekers in Germany comes from Balkan countries, while almost none of them has the right to a residence permit.

Balkan countries like Serbia, Macedonia, Albania and Kosovo were devastated by NATO’s ‘humanitarian’ war in 1999; in which the German Luftwaffe participated. Ever since, privatisation of economies and ethnic violence inherited from the war caused more devastation in these countries. While people like NATO commander General Wesley Clark got rich from privatisation in Kosovo. But refugees from still unsafe Kosovo are unwelcome in Germany.

The violence against asylum seekers increases. In the first half of 2015 in Germany refugee centers were defaced, vandalized or set on fire 150 times. …

The plan is not at all well received. The chairman of the Social Democratic SPD party Yasmin Fahimi thinks that Seehofer “cheaply attacks refugees.”

Commentators also point out the failures of the CSU with some of their political projects in the past period. From the introduction of tolls on the highways, to the kitchen sink subsidy for mothers who stay at home. The party would now like to get attention in this way, says among other people ARD TV commentator Tina Hassel.

Seabirds threatened by plastic


This video is called Roseate tern (Sterna dougallii).

From BirdLife:

Reversing the tide on marine litter

By Nils Moellmann, Thu, 16/07/2015 – 13:07

It’s summer time, so it’s only natural that people – especially holiday-goers – are making a beeline for coasts and beaches. But as if jostling for space with other vacationers on the beach and water wasn’t enough, there’s also marine litter to contend with. This may seem like ‘just rubbish’ to us, but for seabirds, its effects can be devastating.

To prove just how serious an issue marine litter is, some of the species threatened by this are those protected under the EU’s Birds and Habitats Directives (the laws that establish nature protection for specific species and habitats across the EU). Migratory species, such as the Roseate Tern, which nest in the summer on the northern hemisphere in Europe, gather food in the garbage-filled wintering area in the Gulf of Guinea off the West African coast. Gannets on Helgoland Island in the German Bight build their nests from scraps of degraded plastic strings from ropes used by boats (e.g. shipping and fishing) and fishing gear, in which particularly chicks get entangled or worse, strangled.

The decades-old Fulmar monitoring programme in the North Sea has shown that 95% of the stomachs of dead Fulmars contain plastic, which remains undigested for a lifetime, filling their bellies like a cruel diet pill.

Local daily beach cleaning measures are not enough, as the seas are now full of litter from the sea floor to the water’s surface, and its already in the food chain. This is why combating marine litter before it reaches the sea is fundamental to ensure we can achieve ‘Good Environmental Status’ (GES) of EU Seas by 2020 as set out in the EU’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive (a legislation that binds Member States to set up national targets and actions to achieve GES).

What’s being done

In Germany, the project Fishing for Litter is run by the BirdLife partner the Nature and Biodiversity Conservation Union (NABU) in cooperation with the fishing and public sector. The project is simple: Fishers receive large collection bags in which they collect the garbage that gets caught in their fishing gear. They bring these back to the port, where the waste is then sorted, analysed and disposed of for free.

However, actions have to be taken to stop waste – especially for plastic bags, disposable tableware, bottle caps and cigarette butts – ending up in the sea in the first place, at the source. Prevention is the key word. To this end, NABU, together with the German Federal Environmental Agency, runs a project to identify regional preventative actions, such as developing local waste disposal infrastructures, to stop waste from entering the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Inspiration has come from similar projects around the world including from the United Nations Environment Programme, national authorities, environmental organisations and local stakeholders.

What more can be done

Plastic producers and equipment manufacturers have a special responsibility to reduce litter: they must invest in sustainable product design, and manufacture and promote durable products that consume fewer resources and are reusable. They must also disclose the ingredients and additives used in manufacturing. All future plastic must be recycled and be simultaneously truly biodegradable.

But you don’t need to be a factory owner to make a difference. You can start while on holiday! When you go to the beach, buy durable products that can be reused, use your own bag and avoid plastic bags at the supermarket. Also, what about picking up your waste? Lastly, since disposable takeaway causes litter in the oceans, sit down at a café and enjoy your coffee from a real cup.

You’re on vacation, right?

Seabird Population Decrease Shows a Grim Truth About Marine Life: here.

Tracking #seabird mortality induced by light pollution: here.

Less study of nazi crimes at German university


This United States government-commisioned video by director Billy Wilder is called Historic Stock Footage: NAZI DEATH MILLSCRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY.

By Marianne Arens in Germany:

Frankfurt university winds down research on National Socialism

21 July 2015

If the Goethe University in Frankfurt gets its way, future teachers will no longer receive instruction in the history of National Socialism. This is the only conclusion to be drawn from the recent attacks by the university’s education department on the Center for Research on National Socialist Pedagogy.

The head of the Education Department has decided that student attendance of lectures on National Socialist pedagogy will receive little or no official recognition. Students in the teacher training program will no longer receive any credit points, while students in the master’s program in education will, in future, receive only half as many credit points as previously. The credit points correspond to the “certificates” that were previously awarded to students as proof of their academic achievement.

The short statement from the department and the Academy for Educational Research and Teacher Education does not deny depriving student teachers of credit points. In a bureaucratic manner, it refers to the “joint agreement of all German states,” produced at the Culture Ministry Conference on Teacher Education. According to this agreement, topics studied have to concentrate on “instruction, training, diagnostics, and school development.” National Socialist pedagogy, which is ascribed the status of a “special topic,” is considered a “requirement neither in Frankfurt nor in other German or international institutions of teacher education,” the statement reads.

The Research Center for National Socialist Pedagogy was set up four years ago as a pilot project at Frankfurt University. By 2013, it had worked out a two-semester course of study aimed at providing all student teachers and pedagogy students with a knowledge of National Socialism, its crimes and ideology. This course of study has now been carried out successfully three times.

The lectures were always well attended and were frequently overflowing. Professor Benjamin Ortmeyer, who leads the research center, made comparative analyses of pedagogical writings during the period of National Socialism, and researched topics such as National Socialist propaganda against the workers movement and the enforced conformity of opinion (Gleichschaltung) of the Frankfurt University during the Third Reich.

Ortmeyer invited Theresienstadt concentration camp survivor Trude Simonsohn to one of his lectures. Another time, he spoke about Josef Mengele, the concentration camp doctor at Auschwitz-Birkenau, who had written his doctoral dissertation in Frankfurt on “race research” and about whom the professor has written a book (Beyond the Hippocratic Oath: Dr. Mengele and the Goethe University).

The past four years have clearly shown that the course of study on National Socialist pedagogy answers a growing demand. The study of the Third Reich by prospective teachers is all the more important, since the German university and media establishment has evinced a clear trend towards downplaying the role of National Socialism and the lessons of the World War II.

This historical revisionism is closely connected with the revival of German militarism and the aggressive foreign policy of the German government. For example, Herfried Münkler, who teaches political science at the Humboldt University in Berlin, said at the beginning of the year in the Süddeutsche Zeitung: “It is barely possible to conduct a responsible policy in Europe based on the notion: We are to blame for everything.” Münkler argues openly for German hegemony in Europe.

Münkler’s colleague Gunther Hellmann is also pushing for a new foreign policy strategy on the part of the German government. He wrote a book for the Munich Security Conference in 2015 and promotes the new white paper of the armed forces on the web site of the Defense Ministry.

Consequently, it cannot be viewed as accidental that the university management refuses to secure the Center for Research on National Socialist Pedagogy in its curriculum. The department has cut even the modest funding that it had previously provided to the academic staff at the research center, who subsist largely on third party funding provided by the Hans Böckler Foundation, which is close to the trade unions. The presidium will temporarily provide funding, but this is only guaranteed until May 2016.

One of the topics that the research center has already examined illustrates how important the continuation of its work would be. This topic is the enforced conformity of opinion (Gleichschaltung) and the role of the university rector, the infamous Ernst Krieck. In 1939, Krieck wrote, “as in the city of Frankfurt, so also at its university, Marxist ideology and the Jews of a foreign type penetrate and advance. During the epoch of systems, ever more Jews and supporters of Marxism gained academic chairs. … All these elements must be wiped out. … At the same time, the student body will also be purified of them.”

The passage can be found on a panel in the exhibit that was created by students at the university for its 75-year anniversary celebration in 1989: “The brown seizure of power. University of Frankfurt 1930-1945.” The exhibit documents the book burning, suppression and expulsions, “race research and hereditary biology,” and every kind of active support that the Goethe University gave to fascism.

The exhibit plates are still hanging in the old cafeteria building at the Bockenheim campus. Their days are numbered, however, since the university moved to a new location at the Westend campus five years ago. Although the hundred year anniversary of the university was celebrated with great pomp last year, there was no comparable effort or expense put into examining its National Socialist past, and no concrete plans have yet been made to move the exhibit to the new location.

Neo-nazi violence against refugees in Germany


This video from Germany says about itself:

Back in 2011, VICE Germany gained exclusive access to Jamel—a small town often called a “Nazi village” by the press. Jamel may have only housed around 35 permanent residents, but it skewed pretty heavily toward neo-Nazis and extremists who are mostly members of the far-right NPD political party.

Not just nazi violence in the eastern Ukraine and in the western Ukraine … also in Germany.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Neo-Nazis lay siege to asylum-seekers hostel in Freital as race hate rears its ugly head once again in east Germany

A small town has witnessed ugly scenes as neo-Nazis besiege the Hotel Leonardo, an illustration of the country’s mounting xenophobia

Tony Paterson

Freital, Sunday 12 July 2015

Once a model Social Democrat community where the poor in Germany’s Weimar Republic found help and support, the small town of Freital, just south of Dresden, has become a byword for German racism and intolerance.

Its target is Hotel Leonardo, or rather, the 300 or so asylum-seekers who are now virtual prisoners in the former conference hotel. Thanks to local hostility the building is under a round-the-clock police guard and surrounded by a 10ft-high wire fence. Police patrol cars have blocked off access roads.

Twenty nine-year-old Ibrahim Alalelayan, a medical student who arrived in Germany a fortnight ago after fleeing Deraa, his war-torn home town in southern Syria, says he does not try to go into Freital. “I  prefer not to leave the safety of this place,” Mr Alalelayan told The Independent as he stood in the hostel lobby with other frightened refugees 9 July. …

His anxiety is justified. Since March this year the hotel has been the scene of angry anti-foreigner protests in which the rule of the lynch mob has held sway. Up to 1,200 Freital residents and neo-Nazi hangers-on have gathered outside the hostel on weekday evenings chanting slogans such as “Filth out” and “This is no place to flee to”.

The often-intoxicated mob threw eggs and shot fireworks at the hostel claiming that Freital was “defending itself”. The small groups of local refugee supporters who tried to show sympathy with the asylum-seekers had to be protected by riot police.

On 6 July, local xenophobic fury erupted again at a meeting held by the regional authorities in Freital which had been designed to defuse anger and open a reconciliation process. The meeting was abruptly brought to an end as Markus Ulbig, the region’s conservative Interior Minister, was shouted down and mob rule took control. “They are all illegals,” shouted one woman resident. “We will burn down the hostel,” screamed another. …

Accommodation marked out for asylum-seekers has been set ablaze across Germany since late last year. The most recent arson attack was carried out at a future hostel in the east German city of Meissen last week. … In Freital alone there have been a number of incidents including an assault on an asylum-seeker, and an attempt to firebomb refugee accommodation. …

In Freital, where many say the rise of Communism in East Germany and the disenchantment that followed sparked today’s right-wing backlash, anti-foreigner feeling has been encouraged by members of the region’s Pegida (Patriotic Europeans Against Islamification of the West) movement. The group has staged mass demonstrations attracting up to 20,000 people in Dresden earlier this year. Lutz Bachmann, the Pegida leader who posed on Facebook wearing an Adolf Hitler moustache, lives nearby. …

Ines Kummer, one of  Freital’s few Green Party city councillors, said she had been threatened and shouted at by residents for showing support for the asylum-seekers. “Right-wing nationalism and anti-foreigner attitudes have taken root in this part of Germany,” she told The Independent. “Around here the established parties, like Ms Merkel’s ruling conservatives, have not condemned the prevalent racism; they chose to brush  it aside. Now it’s too late.”