Fukushima, Japan, disaster news


This video says about itself:

9 October 2015

FUKUSHIMA, JAPAN — Cases of thyroid cancer among children living close to the Fukushima nuclear power plant have increased fiftyfold since 2011, four Japanese researchers said Tuesday in a report.

Since the meltdown in March 2011, annual thyroid cancer rates in Fukushima Prefecture have been 20 to 50 times the national level, said a team led by professor of environmental epidemiology at Okayama University Toshihide Tsuda.

The findings were based on screenings of around 370,000 Fukushima residents aged 18 or younger at the time of the accident. The study said the increase “is unlikely to be explained by a screening surge.” The researchers point to radiation exposure as a possible factor in the increase in thyroid cancer cases.

The Fukushima Prefecture Government identified 104 thyroid cancer cases as of late August.

An area extending about 20 kilometers from the nuclear plant has been declared an exclusion zone.

FUKUSHIMA — Ten more people were diagnosed with thyroid cancer as of late September this year in the second round of a health survey of Fukushima Prefecture residents, which began in April 2014, a committee overseeing the survey disclosed on Dec. 27: here.

Fate of Fukushima No. 2 nuclear plant remains unknown — The Japan Times: here.

NRA: Ice wall effects ‘limited’ at Fukushima nuclear plantThe Asahi Shimbun: here.

The future of nuclear energy in Japan, nearly six years after the 2011 Fukushima disaster — ABC News: here.

A maverick former Japanese prime minister goes antinuclear — The New York Times: here.

Fukushima causing cancer, Japanese government admits


This video says about itself:

The Thyroid Cancer Hotspot Devastating Fukushima‘s Child Survivors

10 March 2014

Radiating the People: Worrying new claims say childhood cancer cluster has developed around Fukushima radiation zone

It’s what post-Fukushima Japan fears the most; cancer. Amid allegations of government secrecy, worrying new claims say a cancer cluster has developed around the radiation zone and that the victims are children.

In a private children’s hospital well away from the no-go zone, parents are holding on tight to their little sons and daughters hoping doctors won’t find what they’re looking for. Thyroid cancer. Tests commissioned by the local authorities have discerned an alarming spike here. Experts are reluctant to draw a definitive link with Fukushima, but they’re concerned.

“I care because I went to Chernobyl and I saw each child there, so I know the pain they went through”, says Dr Akira Sugenoya, a former thyroid surgeon. What terrifies parents most is a government they feel they can’t trust. It’s created a culture of fear; one which has led a number of women post-Fukushima to have abortions because they were worried about birth defects. “The doctors in Fukushima say that it shouldn’t be coming out so soon, so it can’t be related to the nuclear accident. But that’s very unscientific, and it’s not a reason we can accept”, Dr Sugenoya insists. “It was disclosed that the Fukushima health investigation committee was having several secret meetings. I feel the response has been unthinkable for a democratic nation”, Dr Minoru Kamata from the Japan Chernobyl Foundation says.

ABC Australia

From Japan Safety blog:

First thyroid cancer case in Japan recognized as Fukushima-related & compensated by govt — RT

January 8, 2017

A man who worked at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan during the disastrous 2011 meltdown has had his thyroid cancer recognized as work-related. The case prompted the government to finally determine its position on post-disaster compensation.

The unnamed man, said to be in his 40s, worked at several nuclear power plants between 1992 and 2012 as an employee of Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc. He was present at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant during the March 11, 2011 meltdown. Three years after the disaster, he was diagnosed with thyroid gland cancer, which the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare confirmed on Friday as stemming from exposure to radiation.

The man’s body radiation exposure was totaled at 150 millisieverts, almost 140 of which were a result of the accident. Although this is not the first time that health authorities have linked cancer to radiation exposure for workers at the Fukushima plant, it is the first time a patient with thyroid cancer has won the right to work-related compensation.

There have been two cases previously, both of them involving leukemia.

The recent case prompted Japan’s health and labor ministry to release for the first time its overall position on dealing with compensation issues for workers who were at the Fukushima plant at the time and after the accident. Workers who had been exposed to over 100 millisieverts and developed cancer five years or more after exposure were entitled to compensation, the ministry ruled this week. The dose level was not a strict standard but rather a yardstick, the officials added.

As of March, 174 people who worked at the plant had been exposed to over 100 millisieverts worth of radiation, according to a joint study by the UN and the Tokyo Electric Power Company. There is also an estimate that more than 2,000 workers have radiation doses exceeding 100 millisieverts just in their thyroid gland, Japanese newspaper the Asahi Shimbun reported.

The 2011 accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant was the worst of its kind since the infamous 1986 catastrophe in Chernobyl, Ukraine. After the Tohoku earthquake in eastern Japan and the subsequent tsunami, the cooling system of one of the reactors stopped working, causing a meltdown. Nearly half a million people were evacuated and a 20-kilometer exclusion zone was set up.

Dutch wildlife film in Japan


This September 2016 video is the Japanese trailer for the Dutch wildlife film De Nieuwe Wildernis (The new wilderness), about Oostvaardersplassen national park in the Netherlands.

Translated from Dutch regional broadcasting organisation Omroep Flevoland:

New Wilderness in Japanese cinemas

December 20, 2016

Wildlife film “The New Wilderness” on the Oostvaardersplassen is popular abroad. After, eg, having been shown on TV in Germany and Belgium, the film is now in Japanese cinemas. So says producer Ton Okkerse.

In ten Japanese cities The New Wilderness recently started at the cinemas. A special event according to Okkerse. Not often European films are shown in Japanese cinemas. Certainly not wildlife films.

Japanese interest for the Oostvaardersplassen is according to Okkerse because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster five years ago. This disaster still causes much debate in the country. Thus, inter alia, ‘rewilding’, meaning returning areas to nature, is considered.

What the Japanese exactly think about De Nieuwe Wildernis is guesswork. Okkerse does get reviews and reports on visitors’ numbers, but he can not read them because of the language barrier and Japanese characters.

Fukushima, Japan nuclear disaster update


This video says about itself:

Inside Fukushima’s Radioactive Ghost Towns

12 July 2016

A DAREDEVIL urban explorer has shared haunting images of the abandoned Fukushima earthquake ‘exclusion zone’ after sneaking in to the highly irradiated region. Wearing a gas mask but no other protective clothing, explorer and photographer Keow Wee Loong, 27, visited four of the evacuated towns in Fukushima – Tomioka, Okuma, Namie and Futaba – in June this year with friends Sherena Ng and Koji Hori.

Lying completely untouched since March 2011, the city of Fukushima was evacuated suddenly after the east coast of Japan was devastated by a massive earthquake followed by a huge tsunami. Keow’s images give an eerie insight into the panic that followed the disaster and show a city stuck in time as calendars remain on the same date, families’ clean washing is half-removed from driers and newspapers forever remain unsold.

Videographer / director: Keow Wee Loong
Producer: Crystal Chung, Ellie Winstanley
Editor: Jack Stevens

TOKYO — The combined costs of paying compensation for the Fukushima nuclear disaster and the decommissioning of the plant’s reactors may be double the initial estimate, rising to more than 20 trillion yen ($176 billion), according to estimates by the country’s industry ministry: here.

Why the water cooling system at Fukushima nuclear plant stopped — Business Insider Australia: here.

Japan tsunami highlights Fukushima nuclear plant vulnerability — Voice of America: here.

From the Asahi Shimbun daily in Japan:

Fukushima ‘ghost town’ uses dummies to fill sad post-3/11 void

By TAKUYA ISAYAMA/ Staff Writer

November 17, 2016 at 17:50 JST

NARAHA, Fukushima Prefecture–Ghosts of the past are all around in this Fukushima town whose communities were decimated in the aftermath of the 2011 nuclear disaster.

Less than one-tenth of Naraha’s residents have come home since its evacuation order was lifted, but some who did return have devised a creative solution to the population problem.

Locals have formed a group to make dummies to place them around the town in lieu of the many human inhabitants who have been absent since the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant disaster of March 2011.

The results are poignant.

KYOTO – The magnitude-7.4 aftershock that rocked Fukushima Prefecture and its vicinity last week, more than five years after the mega-quake and tsunami of March 2011, triggered fresh nuclear concerns in the Kansai region, which hosts Kansai Electric Power Co.’s Mihama plant in Fukui Prefecture: here.

Japan’s nuclear export ambitions hit wall as Vietnam set to rip up reactor order — Japan Today: here.

Tsunami off Fukushima, Japan


This video is called Fukushima BREAKING NEWS; NOV. 22 2016 Tsunami Warning issued at FUKUSHIMA, JAPAN.

From ABC in Australia today:

Japan earthquake: Tsunami after quake strikes off Fukushima

Updated 13 minutes ago

A major earthquake has struck off the coast of Fukushima in north-east Japan, triggering a tsunami as residents were urged to flee to higher ground.

Key points:

Earthquake was first recorded as magnitude-7.3, later downgraded to 6.9
The first waves have made landfall, bigger waves are expected to hit the coast
The region is the same that was devastated in 2011, triggering a nuclear crisis

Waves of up to 90 centimetres were recorded about an hour after the 6:00am (local time) earthquake, but public broadcaster NHK warned: “We are going to observe much higher tsunamis.”

Authorities also warned of a tidal rip-current in some areas, meaning a larger wave could be building out to sea.

The tsunami alert predicted waves up to three metres high following the quake, which had a preliminary magnitude of 7.3 but was later downgraded to 6.9 by the US Geological Survey.

The earthquake’s epicentre was at a depth of about 10 kilometres, off the coast of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which suffered a triple meltdown after the earthquake and tsunami which struck in 2011.

Tsunami waves have reached the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. The operator of the plant said there were no abnormalities observed at the plant, NHK said.

NHK urged people to evacuate immediately, reminding them of the 2011 disaster that killed about 18,000 people.

“Please remember the Great East Japan Earthquake and move to higher ground,” it said, also asking residents to help alert elderly relatives to the emergency.

People were urged not to return to their houses until all the warnings are lifted.

There were no immediate reports of damage.

One woman suffered cuts to her head from falling dishes, Kyodo news agency reported, citing fire department officials.

‘My windows were shaking’

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the Government would devote whatever resources were necessary to respond to the quake.

ABC correspondent Rachel Mealey said she felt the tremor in Tokyo, more than 200 kilometres away.

“I haven’t felt one like this is quite a long time. My apartment windows were shaking,” she said.

All nuclear plants on the coast threatened by the tsunami are shutdown in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Only two reactors are operating in Japan, both in the south-west of the country.

Even when in shutdown nuclear plants need cooling systems operating to keep spent fuel cool.

Tokyo Electric Power Co said there was no damage to the plants.

Earthquakes are common in Japan, one of the world’s most seismically active areas.

Japan accounts for about 20 per cent of the world’s earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater.

The March 11, 2011, Fukushima quake was magnitude-9, the strongest quake in Japan on record. The massive tsunami it triggered caused the world’s worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl a quarter of a century earlier.

UPDATE: tsunami warning over; a few people injured.