Tyrannosaurus rex welcomed by children

This Dutch 26 August 2016 video is about the arrival on Beestenmarkt square in Leiden city of the fossil Tyrannosaurus rex Trix.

Trix was welcomed there by many children and adults. Then, she continued to Naturalis museum.

Tyrannosaurus rex to Naturalis museum, video

This is a 26 August 2016 Dutch video with English subtitles about bringing a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil from the USA to Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

Tyrannosaurus rex welcomed in Leiden

This 2 June 2016 video is about a Camarasaurus and other dinosaurs at Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

This morning, a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, excavated in Montana in the USA, arrived at Schiphol airport in the Netherlands.

From Schiphol, it continued to Naturalis museum, preceded by paleontologists/biologists Anne Schulp and Freek Vonk, cheerleaders, a brass band, police and a flowery Tyrannosaurus on a float.

Tyrannosaurus rex float, 26 August 2016

This photo of the float is a cell phone picture, like the others in this blog post.

Tyrannosaurus rex float, Beestenmarkt, 26 August 2016

They proceeded to a welcome party at Beestenmarkt square in Leiden, where hundreds of school children and others were expecting the tyrannosaur, named Trix.

Tyrannosaurus rex truck, 26 August 2016

People had to move back, as a fence had to be moved, as there was not enough space for the float to pass between the fence and a lamppost.

Tyrannosaurus rex truck, on 26 August 2016

Behind the float was the truck with the fossil Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton.

Tyrannosaurus rex brought to museum this Friday

This is a Dutch June 2016 video, recorded in Montana in the USA. It is about assembling fossil Tyrannosaurus rex Trix for transportation to Naturalis museum in the Netherlands; and about excavating Triceratops fossils not far away.

Dutch NOS TV reports today that on Friday 26 August, a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton will be brought from Schiphol airport to Naturalis museum in Leiden.

The fossil dinosaur is probably an elderly female. Her name is Trix.

Three years ago, Trix was found in Montana in the USA. This animal will make Naturalis the only museum outside the US with a Tyrannosaurus rex.

On 10 September, Trix will be at a special tyrannosaur exhibition.

From the end of 2018 on, she will be part of the regular Naturalis exhibition.

Tyrannosaurus rex quest on video

This 17 August 2016 Dutch video shows how scientists of Naturalis museum in Leiden went to the USA to look for Tyrannosaurus rex fossils.

Triceratops dinosaur fossils, from the USA to Dutch museum

After the earlier video about this on this blog, these Dutch videos are about people from Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands going to the USA to fetch Triceratops dinosaur fossils.

This 15 July 2016 video is the most recent one of the series.

Dinosaur extinction, new theory

This 2015 video is called National Geographic Documentary: Extinction Of Dinosaurs. What About Killer Dinosaurs.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Dinosaur extinction mystery solved? Asteroid hit oil field causing smoke that filled Earth’s atmosphere

Temperatures would have plunged as soot blocked out the sun and the rain virtually stopped falling

Ian Johnston, Science Correspondent

21 minutes ago

The dinosaurs were wiped out 66 million years ago because a massive asteroid hit vast oil deposits in Mexico, sending thick black smoke into the atmosphere all over the world, according to a new study.

Soot blocked out the sun, causing the planet to cool significantly and experience devastating droughts.

The amount of sunlight would have fallen by up to 85 per cent, while the Earth would have cooled by as much as 16 degrees Celsius on land for about three years.

At the same time, rainfall would have fallen by up to 80 per cent causing extreme drought.

In a paper in the journal Scientific Reports, the researchers wrote: “Although small mammals and reptiles could have lived underground where it is warmer, the dinosaurs did not.

“The different habitats of the dinosaurs and small mammals and reptiles would also have been key factors in determining their extinction or survival.”

The six-mile-wide asteroid, which hit what is now the Yucatan Peninsula, created the third-largest crater on Earth, some 110 miles across.

It struck the Earth with the force of about a billion nuclear bombs of the size that destroyed the Japanese city of Hiroshima during World War Two.

It had been something of a mystery why some dinosaurs had died out while others, like the ancestors of crocodiles,

The ancestors of crocodiles were not dinosaurs. Though, like dinosaurs, they belonged to the bigger group called archosaurs.

did not.

Previously it was thought that the impact caused vapours of sulphuric acid in the sky, which reflected sunlight leading to global darkness, near-freezing conditions and widespread acid rain.

But the researchers, from Japan’s Meteorological Research Institute and Tohuku Univeristy, said: “If this had occurred, crocodilians and various other animals would have also gone extinct.

“Recent impact experiments and model calculations have demonstrated that condensed sulfuric acid aerosols cannot form and persist over long periods following asteroid impacts.”

It is estimated that just 12 per cent of life on land survived the chaos unleashed by the asteroid, but 90 per cent of freshwater species were able to ride out the sudden shock to the planet.