Tropical shark in Britain, first ever


This 2 March 2017 video is called Crocodile Shark discovered in UK waters for first time.

From the BBC:

Crocodile Shark discovered in UK waters for first time

2 March 2017

A tropical species of shark has been found on the UK coastline for the first time in recorded history, marine experts said.

A Crocodile Shark carcass was discovered on a beach at Hope Cove near Plymouth and was reported to the National Marine Aquarium.

Experts think the animal, normally found in tropical waters, may have died from the shock of UK’s colder seas.

It is commonly found in Brazil and Australia growing to about 1m (3.3ft).

Steven Greenfields spotted the shark washed up on the beach while walking with his family.

Warmer waters

Mr Greenfields said: “We regularly visit this beach and have never seen anything like this before. My whole family was stunned as the animal had really unusual features but was unmistakably a shark.

Because it was so unusual we consulted our local aquarium to confirm what species it was.”

James Wright, curator at the National Marine Aquarium, said: “This species has never been recorded in the UK before, as it is normally found in deep waters during the day in tropical climates, such as Brazil and Australia, then coming shallower at night to feed.

“With the Crocodile Shark accustomed to much warmer waters, travelling so far and reaching colder waters would have caused a shock to its system and account for the cause of death.

“We would urge the public to share any other unusual sightings with us or The Shark Trust, so we can monitor any trends.”

Paul Cox, managing director of the Shark Trust, said: “Any information that we can get is useful so it’s great that this one has been reported and identified.”

British bats fly this December


This video from England says about itself:

Lesser Horseshoe Bats – April 11th 2012 – Devon

Lesser Horseshoe bats filmed on a TV screen from a bat cam set up in a roost on Marsland Nature Reserve – a building has been specially converted to accomodate the roost which has built from just 1 over 10 years ago to 106 in 2011. These individuals are being irritated on occasions by a bat fly parasite (can be seen moving over the back of one @ 52 seconds).

Lizzie Platt from Devon in England reports on Twitter today that bats are flying around. Very unusual for December; because of unusually warm weather.

British bats: here.

English poachers let little girl watch fox cubs savaged by hounds


This video from Britain says about itself:

FOX RESCUED FROM THE SNAPPING JAWS OF HOUNDS

23 November 2012

DRAMATIC RESCUE CAPTURED ON FILM – A young vixen owes her life to the quick thinking and courage of a hunt monitor who literally dived in and grabbed her from amongst the hounds that were just about to maul her to death …

The young woman was out monitoring the Old Berks Fox Hounds who met at Elmwood House, Black Bourton in Oxfordshire. Not long after the hunt moved off, the Huntsman sent the hound pack into woodland and thick undergrowth.

The hounds found the fox in scrub next to large slurry tanks on the edge of a farm.

Fortunately for the fox, her “guardian angel” was only feet away. With no thought for her own safety, the monitor shouted at the hounds as they closed in on the fox, and running forward, was able to snatch the terrified animal. She then scooped her up, away from amongst the hounds, which would in moments have undoubtedly torn the young animal to pieces. The fox had already been bowled over onto her back, leaving her stomach exposed.

Despite having been bitten by the terrified fox, the monitor hurried the traumatised animal away, cradled in her arms, whilst her colleague, who filmed the whole incident, called for help.

Being followed by a Hunt participant, they reached a fellow monitor’s car and the fox was then driven away to safety. She was checked for injuries, and thanks to the monitor’s lightning reactions, was found to have no serious bites.

The fox has now been rehabilitated into an area where she will be safe from the hunt.

If you like what Hunt Monitors do please visit our Hunt Monitors facebook page

and if you would like to donate to help us, please visit our Go Fund Me account.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain:

Fox hunters slammed for letting little girl watch hounds savage bloodied corpses of dead cubs

22:53, 6 Nov 2015

By Ben Glaze

The girl, aged around six, was with 14 men who flung the lifeless cubs to a pack of 30 hounds in a hunt training exercise

A small girl looks on as a pack of hunt hounds swarm around the bloodied bodies of two fox cubs.

The shocking footage, captured by anti-hunt campaigners, shows the child – aged around six – waving her arms as the bloodthirsty pack mills about the lifeless young animals.

The fox cubs, whose corpses are hidden from view in the footage, had been thrown to the 30-strong pack moments earlier, already dead.

Wearing pink wellington boots, a white-and-pink top and blue jeans, the little girl can be seen dancing around the dogs, then backing away.

As she does so, 14 grown-ups stand by watching the fired-up hounds, tails wagging with delight, being directed by their handlers.

Animal rights activists tonight condemned the group for letting a youngster view the distressing sight.

Tom Quinn, campaigns director of the League Against Cruel Sports, asked: “What kind of people are so unashamedly happy to parade their cruelty in front of a child?”

He added: “The majority in the UK are strongly against hunting. This is its dark reality.

“We’re sure they’ll be shocked and disgusted to see a little girl being brought along to witness this barbarism.”

Animal welfare campaigners passed the video to the Mirror after seeing the youngster appear alongside the adults for the dawn “training” rite.

In the one minute, 45 second film, recorded in the mid-Devon countryside, the girl can be seen glancing up at the group of gilet-clad adults observing the hounds.

The foxes were thrown to the pack already dead in what is thought to be part of a training process.

In the footage, a middle-aged man perches on a red quad bike, while a silver 4×4 stands parked at an open gate.

The video begins with the girl, her hair tied back in a pony tail, crouching to the ground then popping up, scratching her head, looking to the adults and folding her arms across her chest.

She then turns back to look at the dogs before one fox corpse is picked up from the ground.

The second animal’s lifeless body is also retrieved, and a kennel worker carries both across the freshly harvested field to sling them into a box on the rear of the quad bike.

The horrific scenes unfolded near the village of Nymet Rowland, with dogs from the nearby 217-year-old Eggesford Kennels.

The kennels describe the land as “good hunting country”, extending 19 miles east to west and some 20 miles north to south.

An undercover investigator from the League Against Cruel Sports, who shot the footage from a public right of way, said: “It’s likely the cubs were dug out of their den and shot by the hunt’s terrierman.” …

A botched effort to relax anti-hunt laws forced Prime Minister David Cameron into a climbdown in July.

A commenter on the Daily Mirror site writes:

If a six-year-old had been taken to a dogfight on a working-class housing estate then they would be called straight away and the parents would be fully investigated.

I call upon Child Protection to make sure that this is done.

Police appeal after allegation of dog hunting and killing fox near Plymouth: here.

Police launch investigation after fox killed during Atherstone Hunt | Tamworth Herald: here.

Watching fish good for health, new study


This 2012 video is called National Marine Aquarium, Plymouth, Devon, England.

By Kyle Young:

Calm And Soothing: Watching Fish is Beneficial To Health, Research Finds

When you think of healthy activities, you probably picture morning jogs, yoga, maybe choking down a protein shake.

But research offers a surprising addition – staring at fish!

A study conducted in Plymouth, UK at the National Marine Aquarium found that after watching fish “people felt more positive” and “became more relaxed.” The study even noted reductions in blood pressure and heart rate.

This is not an entirely new concept. Past research has led many doctors’ offices and dental practices to include small aquariums in their waiting rooms with the intention of decreasing stress. But according to Deborah Cracknell, the Lead Researcher, “This study has, for the first time, provided robust evidence that ‘doses’ of exposure to underwater settings could actually have a positive impact on people’s wellbeing.” It also demonstrated that adding more fish to an exhibit can enhance the beneficial effects for viewers.

I should add here that having too many fish in a relatively small aquarium is not good for the well-being of the fish, disturbing them, and probably ultimately also humans watching them.

Also, aquarium fish should be species and individuals getting along well together. I remember an aquarium at an elderly people’s home, where fish quarreled, aggressively pursuing each other. If at an elderly people’s home or similar building there is not a person able to take care well of an aquarium and its inhabitants, then an aquarium there might not be such a good idea.

More Information About the Research Study and Its Findings

Scientists from Plymouth University and the University of Exeter Medical School collaborated to conduct this study at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth, UK. The University of Exeter reports, “The researchers benefited from a unique opportunity in order to conduct their study when the National Marine Aquarium refurbished one of its main exhibits – in a large 550,000 litre tank – and began a phased introduction of different fish species.”

In their report, the researchers explain how they took advantage of the situation by venturing to measure “behavioral, physiological, and psychological reactions to increases in levels of marine biota.” To do this, they divided the test subjects into three groups. The first group “viewed the exhibit when it contained only seawater and artificial decoration.” The second group viewed the tank when it was partially stocked, and the third viewed the fully stocked tank. The goal was to determine whether participants viewing a fully stocked tank would experience greater results than those viewing a partially stocked tank.

As it turned out, the researchers were on to something. The study found that “increased biota levels were associated with longer spontaneous viewing of the exhibit, greater reductions in heart rate, greater increases in self-reported mood, and higher interest.”

The scientists suggested these findings could potentially help companies design better exhibits to “maximize the restorative potential of aquaria in health care environments and other stressful settings such as the workplace.”

Are butterflies dangerous, see photo?


Red admiral

This photo by Stephen Bassett shows a red admiral butterfly on a sign in Axe Valley Wildlife Park in Devon in England, on 21 August 2015.