Bigger-brained birds have less chance of being shot


This video says about itself:

Raptor migration over Skagen, N Jutland, Denmark in May, 2016. Featured species are (among others) hobby (Falco subbuteo), rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus), peregrine (Falco peregrinus), and osprey (Pandion haliaetus).

From Biology Letters:

Brain size and the risk of getting shot

Anders Pape Møller, Johannes Erritzøe

Published 2 November 2016

Abstract

Hunting kills hundreds of millions of animals annually, potentially constituting an important selection pressure on hunted species. We hypothesized that hunted individuals differing from survivors by having better ability to distinguish between dangerous humans and other human beings would be at a selective advantage.

We tested whether shot individual birds had smaller brains than survivors, under the assumption that individuals with larger brains had superior escape ability. We used a large database on birds from Denmark to test whether getting shot was predicted by brain mass, while controlling statistically for the potentially confounding effects of age, sex, body mass and body condition.

Analyses based on all species, or only species that were hunted, while controlling for differences in sampling effort in random effects models, showed consistently that shot individuals had smaller brains than survivors.

Danish music, bus against Donald Trump


So, there is not only musicians’ opposition to Donald Trump in the USA … and in the Netherlands … and in Britain. This music video from Denmark says about itself:

18 October 2016

Anti-Trump song. “Stop The Trumpet!” Share if you agree!

Danish-American producer Noah Rosanes and his team of Danish musicians, graphic designers and animators have for the last two months been working on the music and the animated video for “Stop The Trumpet!”

Noah’s vocal is backup up by The Billy Surfs, Mexican born Julian Maraboto has a rap feature too, and the song title is enhanced by a distinctive trumpet theme! The song’s political references shine through when you listen to Rosanes’ lyrics with the ironic opening line “Build a wall ten feet taller, only makes your “hands” look smaller!”

While the world is watching the upcoming presidential election with trepidation, dual Danish-American citizen Noah Rosanes couldn’t stand by just watching. As Trump’s poisonous messages quickly escalated, so did Rosanes’ fear of what the future would bring under a Trump presidency. Rosanes created “Stop The Trumpet” based on this fear.

“Like many others, I felt powerless over the way Trump presented his twisted view of the world. I’m sincerely scared of how the world would look if he gets the world’s most powerful job,” says Noah Rosanes.

“Trump is a man without political experience who only incites hatred and creates division at a time when we in particular need to stand together around the world. Sometimes you have to step up and do something and as a musician this is my way to communicate ” explains Rosanes.

Noah Rosanes has already gotten a lot of support.

On November 8 – Election Day – the entire musical team behind “Stop The Trumpet” will be performing the song live at the Democratic Election Night Party 2016 in Copenhagen.

“Stop The Trumpet!” is out on all digital platforms and the video will be release on October 17.

Written and Produced by Noah Rosanes

Noah Rosanes: Vocal/Guitar
Julian Maraboto: Mexican Rap
Trumpet: Asbjørn Kamban

The Billy Surfs:
Drums: Johannes Gissel
Bass: Rasmus Todbjerg
Backing Vocals: Sara Broberg

Video:
Concept: Noah Rosanes

Art Direction: Anekdote Studio

Illustration: Nicolai Boye Brodersen, Signe Dejgaard Jensen

Motion Graphic Design/ Animation: Stig Christensen, Birk Kromann

This video says about itself:

Americans’ first reaction to anti-Trump music video “Stop The Trumpet”

15 October 2016

“Stop The Trumpet!” is an anti-Trump anthem accompanied by an animated music video. Here people on the street see the video before it came out!

From The Local in Denmark:

Danish anti-Trump campaigns target American voters

Published: 27 Oct 2016 09:06 GMT+02:00

If you were on the streets of Copenhagen this week or merely just scrolled through your social media feeds, you more than likely came across two Danish campaigns pleading with American voters to keep Donald Trump out of the White House.

On Wednesday, at least one of the 1-A buses in the Danish capital was wrapped in an advertisement from the Socialist People’s Party (SF) reading ‘Americans Abroad: Vote’. Just who SF wants the Americans to vote for was made quite obvious by the the close-up of Republican candidate Donald Trump’s face in which the wheels of the bus were made to give him a pair of googly eyes.

This video is called Even This Bus In Denmark Is Rolling Its Eyes At Donald Trump.

SF leader Pia Olsen Dyhr told broadcaster DR that while the ad was meant in good fun, she finds the idea of a Trump presidency “frightening”.

“It is meant to be a bit funny. One can’t be in doubt that it was done tongue in cheek. We want to tell American citizens: ‘Remember to vote, it has consequences’,” Dyhr said.

The anti-Trump bus ad comes at the same time that a Danish-produced animated music video is quickly making the rounds on Facebook and Twitter.

Danish-American producer Noah Rosanes and a group of Danish backing musicians, graphic designers and animators last week released the music video ‘Stop the Trumpet’.

The song opens with a line that targets one of Trump’s signature positions and one of his perceived physical shortcomings: “Build a wall ten feet taller, only makes your hands look smaller”.

The video shows an animated Trump being blown back in forth by trumpets and getting stomped in a virtual game of whack-a-mole. The song’s chorus says “we’re gonna save the world” but only if we first “stop the Trumpet”.

According to a poll, only 4% of people in Denmark would vote for Trump if they could vote in the US presidential elections.

United States-Danish-Australian killing of Syrian soldiers


This video says about itself:

U.S. airstrike on Syrian army position kill 62 soldiers, paving way for Daesh [ISIS] attack

17 September 2016

UPDATE by SANA reporters from the battlefield: Army and Armed Forces units recover control over areas that it had lost control over earlier due to American aircraft attack on positions in the surroundings of Deir Ezzor Airport.

The General Command of the Army and Armed Forces said that US alliance aircrafts targeted at 5 PM on Saturday a Syrian Arab Army position in al-Tharda Mountain in the surroundings of Deir Ezzor Airport, causing losses in lives and equipment and clearly paved the way for ISIS terrorists to attack the position and take control of it.

In a statement, the General Command said that this act is a serious and blatant aggression against the Syrian Arab Republic and its army, and constitutes conclusive evidence that the United States and its allies support ISIS and other terrorist organizations, stressing that this act reveals the falseness of their claims of fighting terrorism.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Danes and Australians involved in mistaken Syria airstrike

Today, 09:22

The air raid on Syrian government forces that has been designated by the US as a mistake was carried out by at least Danish and Australian warplanes. This say the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten and Australian Prime Minister Turnbull.

Aircraft of the international coalition that is fighting against Islamic State [ISIS] probably mistook the Syrian military for ISIS warriors. In the attack on Saturday dozens of Syrian soldiers were killed.

Investigation

According to the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, two Danish F-16s were involved in the attack. The Danish Defence Minister is willing to coöperate in the investigation into the air strike, the newspaper writes.

The newspaper says also other countries were involved in the attack, but does not say which countries.

Deplore

Australian Prime Minister Turnbull said during a visit to New York that Australian aircraft took part in the attack. He regretted that Syrian soldiers were killed in the attack and that the Australian attack stopped immediately when the Russians told them what was going on.

The Australian defense minister refused to say to the Australian news channel ABC whether Australian aircraft were involved in the attack. …

It looks like this war ‘defense’ minister is less honest than her prime minister.

Ceasefire

According to Russia, the US has with this attack threatened the cease-fire in Syria. The Russian Foreign Minister said that the US attacks “balance on the border of criminal negligence and direct complicity with the ISIS terrorists”.

The Russians call upon the US to do a comprehensive investigation into the attack.

Danish government punishes old lady for helping refugee baby


This video says about itself:

Danish human rights campaigner found guilty of smuggling

11 March 2016

* Couple’s lawyer says no money changed hands
* Family of six were driven from a Danish ferry terminal to a bridge crossing leading to Sweden
* Couple has two weeks to appeal

A court in Denmark has fined a prominent children’s rights campaigner for giving a family of Syrian migrants a ride across the country to Sweden.

Read more here.

Translated from Dutch daily NRC Handelsblad:

She helped stranded refugees and was fined 3,350 euros

Several hundred Danes were given thousands of euros fines because they helped stranded refugees. Lise Ramslog for example, a year ago she helped refugees with a newborn baby to Malmö and was punished for it.

Eppo König

September 5, 2016

On the day Lise Ramslog (70) became a people smuggler, she actually only wanted to go to an ATM. It was Monday, September 7th, 2015, a year ago, when the first wave of refugees reached Denmark.

In her little red Skoda she rode in the afternoon to the bank in Rødbyhavn, a southern port town. “Then I saw a lot of exhausted people sitting and lying along the highway,” says the Danish woman. “Not a pretty sight.”

Around 300 refugees, mostly Syrians and Iraqis, had arrived through Germany by train and ferry in Denmark. Police had halted rail traffic. In the heat then men, women and children walked on the E47 highway to the Swedish city Malmö, almost 200 kilometers away. From some crossovers xenophobes spat on them.

First Ramslog turned her car around. “I did not want to see those people. I thought, I’m going to the woods … But on the way I saw a resident talk to refugees, two couples and a young boy. They pointed to my car and said Sweden, Sweden! They showed me their railway tickets from Hamburg to Malmö. I had better bring them to the station in Maribo, I thought. That was not so far.”

She tells her story in the office of Lisbeth Zornig in Copenhagen. Zornig was children’s ombudswoman in Denmark from 2010 to 2012 and is half of a well-known detective thriller author couple with her husband, former journalist Mikael Lindholm. Like Lise Ramslog she also that September day helped hiking refugees. Both were convicted this year to a fine. This month is the appeal of Zornig and Lindholm. To nearly 160 Danes the same happened last year. This year their number is in the hundreds, appears from media reports. …

The refugee crisis came two months after the appointment of a new Liberal minority government with tacit support of the radical right-wing Danish People’s Party (DF). Strict asylum laws, translated into Arabic published in Lebanese newspapers, refugees had to be put off. Family reunification for asylum seekers is impossible in the first year, they said. The police may confiscate money and [jewelry] property as a contribution to shelter. …

In Denmark you can get up to two years in prison, or a fine, if you deliberately help ‘aliens’ across the border, transport or host them. Danes who do that are legally traffickers. In the Netherlands it is also against the law, but only if it is “for profit” or for money.

“If you offer a stranger a cup of coffee at home in Denmark or allow him or her to sit on the carrier of your bicycle, that’s criminal,” says Mikael Lindholm. Zornig: “They criminalize decency.”

Lise Ramslog does not know how the men and women in her car were called and where they came from. They did not speak each other’s language. Through the rearview mirror they smiled at each other. “They laughed when I laughed. I could see that they were afraid.” She gave them some lemonade and biscuits.

A baby under her dress

“From the back seat I heard strange noises. I looked and saw that one of the women hid something under her clothes: a newborn baby! Then I decided to bring them all the way to Copenhagen. Yes, and there I saw again signs with Sweden on them – to Malmö you just cross a toll bridge. So I just drove on.”

She is used to make mileage. Ramslog is a former professional driver, transporting flowers.

The toll was nearly 130 euros – she had just enough money in her pocket. There was no passport control. “Thank you, thank you, they kept saying when we were over the border. And, money, money. I was not sure whether they wanted money or wanted to give me money. But I said ‘No, thanks’ and gave the boy my glass brooch: a four-leaf clover. I had received it from my sister, because my daughter had died the previous year. They wanted to return the brooch, but I said, he’s still young. I hope he has more luck in life than me.”

On her way back Ramslog came across a police cordon. “I saw large white buses with refugees in them. How nice, I thought. They have arranged buses so that all those people do not have to walk. But they did not go to where they wanted to, they were deported to the ferry to Germany.”

At half past eleven at night she was finally back in her remote home in Nakskov. “My husband was worried and had called friends. I had not brought a phone. I was barefoot all the time. That’s the way I like walking in the woods.”

The next day, her husband said: “You realize you’re a smuggler? So they say on TV about people who help refugees.” Ramslog could not believe it. She put her story on Facebook. They drove back to the bank and met radio and TV journalists. “I told them what had happened. It really popped out. And that was in the news.”

Sometime later a policeman called. “You know why I call?, he said. I said it probably will not be for my speeding ticket. He asked me to make a statement. I do not know what will happen, he said. Maybe you will be prosecuted. ”

She began to worry only when she received a summons and was advised to find a lawyer. “You know what that cost? My husband and I live on 940 euros per month. I just told the judge the story myself. When the decision came, I almost fell off my chair. A fine of 3,350 euros! Since I am retired, they were so “nice” to halve the amount. They did not hang me, but just chopped my hand off.”

I do not regret it

The couple Zornig and Lindholm was fined 6,000 euros together for smuggling. Zornig that September day was also near Rødbyhavn for lecturing. They took to their beach house six refugees. Her husband later in Copenhagen put them on the train to Sweden. She was also filmed by journalists and put a photo of the group on Twitter. “Refugees Pit Stop”, she wrote.

“When people saw that, many more drove to the south with food, drinks and diapers,” says Zornig. “The police can only prosecute people who themselves told to have helped refugees, like us. And people against whom complaints were made by people who were angry about the helping. I am being sued by more than ten people, even by people from Norway and Iceland. We know their names, but we do not know them.”

Acquittal for the same offense

Last month something interesting happened. Two cohabiting women were acquitted for the same offense: a councilor of Aarhus city and a candidate for parliament. They allowed two refugees to stay overnight and bought tickets for them for the ferry to Norway. The court was not certain that they helped “aliens” “intentionally”.

Lindholm: “So it goes then with two politicians. My faith in our legal system has been considerably eroded. … A man who has got a 670 euro fine when he spat on refugees last year. And we get a 6000 euro fine? What example do we give that way?

Things turned out well with the penalty for Ramslog. The Danish jazz musician Benjamin Koppel started a crowd-fund action for Zornig and Lindholm. In a short time he raised nearly 22,000 euros. That also paid Ramslog’s fine. But they still can not tell the story without tears. “I have no regrets and I’m not angry. I just can not understand and do not accept that I’m convicted of something I do not consider to be criminal.” …

If Ramslog goes to the shops, she always passes a refugee center. “There is no bus. If people want to buy something, they have to walk five kilometers. But if I drive along, they know they can get a ride. They are very grateful. I simply will keep doing it. And that is not illegal, because those people have papers.”

This is a jazz music video by Marie Carmen Koppel & Benjamin Koppel – Cause It Reminds Me Of You.

Danish MPs banned from Australian refugee prison camp


This video says about itself:

Violence and sexual abuse revealed in Nauru files

9 August 2016

The Guardian has released 2000 incident reports from Australia’s Nauru detention camp which highlight suicide attempts, assaults and sexual abuse. Guardian reporter Paul Farrell joins Checkpoint.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Danes halt Pacific trip after MP snub

Wednesday 31st August 2016

DENMARK: A delegation of Danish MPs cancelled a visit to Australia’s refugee detention camp on the Pacific island of Nauru yesterday after two leftwingers were denied entry.

Johanne Schmidt-Nielsen of the Red-Green Alliance and Jacob Mark of the Socialist People’s Party had both criticised Canberra’s draconian refugee policy.

The delegation, including anti-immigration Danish People’s Party MPs, cancelled the trip over the snub.

Only 1,868 refugees from war-ravished Syria and Iraq have been brought to Australia since the Liberal-National government promised, nearly a year ago, to settle 12,000 people. With 4.8 million Syrian refugees now living in camps across Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, this is a contemptible response. For all the government’s claims to be fighting in Iraq and Syria for humanitarian motives—to protect the people of the Middle East from the atrocities of ISIS—its reaction to the fate of those displaced by the war underscores its true attitude toward the millions of victims of the predatory US-led war in Iraq and Syria: here.

Danes against government stealing refugees’ jewelry


LGBTQ pro-refugee demonstrators at Danish embassy in London

Where is fictional British pilot and jewel thievery crime fighter Biggles, now that we need him in reality to arrest the Danish governmental jewel thieves?

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Thefts from refugees are sparking a popular resistance

Saturday 19th March 2016

[Danish daily] Dagbladet Arbejderen editor-in-chief Birthe Sorensen looks at the effect of state racism

IT CAUSED a stir in the world when Denmark in January this year adopted the socalled Jewellery Act.

It is a law that requires Danish police to seize refugees’ belongings if they have a value in excess of 10,000 Danish kroner (approximately £1,050) while having no special sentimental value to the person in question either.

When the law was named Jewellery Act, it was due to the fact that the Danish government originally had planned for the authorities to confiscate asylum-seekers’ jewellery, including wedding rings, if they cost more than 3,000 kroner.

But after some debate, the law was changed. Now jewellery with sentimental value cannot be confiscated. In practical terms the Jewellery Act has hardly any significance. None of the refugees coming to Denmark carry large values with them.

Far worse, however, are all the other measures that the Danish government has carried out. It has now been allowed to detain asylumseekers as well as rejected asylumseekers indefinitely. The waiting period for the right to family reunification of refugees with temporary protection has been extended from one to three years after arrival in Denmark.

Cash allowances for asylumseekers have been reduced by 10 per cent to 57 kroner (£6) a day (for food, clothing, toiletries, telephone, etc), and it has become a lot harder to get permanent residency.

The government justifies all its restrictive measures with the argument that they should act as a disincentive to apply for asylum in Denmark. Thus the government hopes to reduce the number of new asylumseekers.

To this end, the government is also beginning to accommodate the refugees in tent camps, despite the fact that Denmark has plenty of empty houses that could easily be converted into asylum centres.

In 2015, Denmark received 21,225 asylum-seekers, which is the highest number to date. Denmark has historically received many refugees, without our society collapsing.

In 1990, for example, Denmark received 18,994 applications for asylum, Iranians and stateless Palestinians being the largest groups. Two years later, in 1992, 20,071 people requested asylum in Denmark. The high figure was due mainly to a surge in asylum-seekers from ex-Yugoslav states.

The Danish government (a one party, neoliberal cabinet) has been backed by a large majority in parliament for its harsh line against foreigners. Both the bourgeois minority government and its supporting parties, as well as the Social Democrats, have supported the government on these matters.

This should all be seen in light of the fact that the right-populist and anti-immigration Danish People’s Party during the past several years has enjoyed increasing success among voters. Today it is the second largest party in parliament with 37 out of 179 seats. The party’s success has meant that the other parties have competed to implement austerity measures on immigration matters.

At the same time, however, a large popular movement has been growing, working to offer the refugees welcome in Denmark just as there have been several demonstrations, both to welcome refugees and to protest against the government’s anti-immigration measures.

The biggest movement is by far Venligboerne, which translated into English means Friendly Habitants. Originally started in a small town in northern Jutland three years ago, when the town received 500 asylumseekers in a short timespan, the movement today is still growing.

Along with 10 other Facebook groups, 44-year-old nurse Merete Bonde Pilgaard created Venligboerne Refugee Council, which was intended to welcome the then newly arrived refugees.

Today, no less than 80 cities in Denmark have their own group of Venligboerne with volunteers and active citizens who assist and help refugees with the small and large challenges of everyday life. All the groups are organised around different local Facebook pages, and together there are now more than 130,000 Friendly Habitants evenly represented in various cities around the country, including a couple of European cities as well.

“We see the meeting with the new citizens as an opportunity to add some extra joy and insight into life. We want to welcome them to this country, and we will do our utmost to be friendly when meeting them. Hence the name Friendly Habitants,” the group emphasises on its Facebook page. Local initiatives are ever emerging.

In Djursland (the eastern part of the Jutland peninsula), a woman launched a collection aimed to fund a new bus to be used by the local asylum centre Lyngbygard, which in September last year was subjected to an arson attack.

In Copenhagen, locals among other activities have organised legal advice for asylum-seekers and created groups for collecting money for the refugees, and most recently has opened a cafe in Vesterbro in the centre of the Danish capital. Furthermore, Venligboerne organises activities at detention centres all over the country.

Among many other things, people participate in social events with refugees such as barbecues and communal eating, and set up groups where locals invite residents in asylum centres on outings as well as arranging dinners and play dates for children.

Anyone who wants to contribute and show kindness can sign up via the Facebook groups and thus be part of the movement.

“There must be room for everyone in our groups, regardless of political leanings, as long as they want to help create friendships, show kindness and build bridges,” writes Venligboerne Refugee Council.

Danish police seize valuables from asylum seekers for first time. Cash seized from two men and three women under law that allows police to confiscate valuables worth over 10,000 kroner: here.

As a result of the Danish government’s response to a recent European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruling, it will now be more difficult for Danes to bring foreign spouses and other family members into the country: here.