Baby owl in Colorado, USA


This video from Colorado in the USA says about itself:

Boulder County Sheriff’s Deputies meet their feathery match!

Our Sheriff’s Office deputies were driving near a campground on July 23 [2015] when they were stopped in their tracks by this young Northern Saw Whet Owl. After some curious head twisting (on both sides) it safely flew away. Watch the deputy have a conversation with the baby owl as it clicks back to her.

See also here.

Bears, ants and flowers in Colorado, USA


This video from North America is called DISCOVERING THE BLACK BEAR.

From Wildlife Extra:

The bear, the ant and the yellow flower – scientist discovers an odd relationship

For a huge Black Bear, a very small ant would hardly seem to make a meal but in numbers these tiny insects are protein-packed.

Not only that, but the fact that bears eat ants is a crucial part of a complicated food chain that has wide-reaching benefits for wildlife in the US.

In a paper published in Ecology Letters, Florida State University researcher Josh Grinath examines the close relationship between bears, ants and rabbitbrush — a golden-flowered shrub that grows in the meadows of Colorado and often serves as shelter for birds.

Scientists know that plant and animal species don’t exist in a vacuum. However, tracing and understanding their complex interactions can be a challenge.

Grinath, working with Associate Professors Nora Underwood and Brian Inouye, has spent several years monitoring ant nests in a mountain meadow in Almont, Colorado.

On one visit, he discovered that bears disturbed the nests, which led him to wonder exactly how this disturbance might affect other plants and animals in the meadow.

From 2009 to 2012, Grinath, Underwood and Inouye collected data on bear damage to ant nests. In the course of this they noticed that rabbitbrush, a dominant plant in the area, was growing better and reproducing more near to the damaged nests.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Rabbitbrush-Nectar Source for Butterflies

18 September 2012

Rubber Rabbitbrush (Ericameria nauswosa) is in bloom now; most all other flowering plants have already gone to seed. Adult butterflies still on the wing that nectar visit these shrubs; at times several lep[idopteran] species can be found at these shrubs. Featured are: West Coast Lady, Hoary Comma, Juba Skipper, and Red Admiral.

The Wildlife Extra article continues:

The reason why was an insect called a treehopper, a tiny cicada-like arthropod that sucks sap out of plants such as rabbitbrush, which damages the plant.

Previous studies had established that ants and treehoppers have a mutualistic relationship, meaning they benefit from one another.

So the team began a series of controlled field experiments to see what would happen to treehoppers, first if there were more ants around and then if there were fewer.

They found that ants didn’t prey on the treehoppers or the rabbitbrush. Rather, they scared away other insects that typically prey on treehoppers.

In a situation where bears disturbed and ate ants, other bugs were free to prey on the treehoppers and the rabbitbrush thrived.

The study also highlighted how a modern phenomenon could end up causing more than just a nuisance.

Bears’ diets are being changed by their proximity to human habitation, and many populations are now eating human rubbish regularly instead of ants and other traditional food sources.

“Bears have an effect on everything else because they have an effect on this one important species — ants,” Grinath says.

“If bears are eating trash instead of ants, that could compromise the benefits the plants are receiving. These indirect effects are an important consideration in conservation.”

Misfit yellow-bellied marmots save lives


This video from California in the USA says about itslf:

Filmed in Desolation Wilderness at around 8,000 feet elevation. I just stood there and the curious animal just walked up to me. June 2012.

The video was taken with a Canon powershot s95 and as you can tell, when the yellow bellied marmot came in close, the Canon wasn’t able to auto focus. The whole video was taken at around 3x optical zoom.

From Science:

Misfit marmots save the day

By Nicholas Weiler

23 January 2015 4:15 pm

A peaceful community of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) should be grateful for its outcasts. When they notice a slinking coyote or circling hawk, loners are most likely to sound the alarm and alert the colony, according to a new study of marmot social networks.

Each summer since 2002, researchers have tracked the alarm calls and social behavior of tagged marmots from six colonies near the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Colorado. They jotted down each friendly encounter—nose rubs, cuddles, and playful tussles—to reconstruct the social network linking 142 of the cat-sized mountain squirrels. The researchers rated each marmot for qualities such as social influence and vulnerability based on the number and strength of its relationships.

They suspected that the most socially adept animals would be first to alert their cliques to danger, but in fact, unpopular marmots whistled alarm calls most frequently, the team reports online this month in Behavioral Ecology. Socially vulnerable marmots may call out predators because they can’t rely on strong social networks for protection, the researchers speculate. But standing guard could also be a way to gain access to the in crowd.

Lions, new film


This video is called Lion Ark – Official Trailer.

From Wildlife Extra:

ADI’s award-winning film Lion Ark goes global

The award-winning documentary Lion Ark is to be distributed worldwide thanks to a deal the charity Animal Defenders International (ADI) brokered with ITV Studios Global Entertainment (ITVS GE).

The deal was signed ahead of Lion Ark’s theatrical release in cinemas across the UK in November.

Lion Ark follows a team from ADI as they rescued 25 lions from circuses in Bolivia after the country’s government banned wild animal acts. The government’s decision was the direct result of ADI’s two-year undercover investigation into circuses across South America.

The film shows the team journeying across a vast, hostile terrain to track down the circuses defying the new law in order to save the animals from a lifetime of cruelty. It reaches a joyous finale as 25 lions are airlifted in ADI’s Operation Lion Ark flight to freedom in Colorado.

“We wanted to make a film that would entertain and inspire, but also have audiences laughing out loud, cheering for the lions, and leave them smiling,” said Tim Phillips, the director of Lion Ark.

“Lion Ark has received a fantastic response at film festivals, with standing ovations and sell out screenings, so we are really excited to be taking it to a wider audience with ITV Studios Global Entertainment.”

“Lion Ark tells an incredible story of bravery, compassion, camaraderie and determination as a team of people fight an immense battle to save these beautiful creatures from horrific cruelty and abuse,” said Ronan Hand, Head of Factual and Entertainment Acquisitions for ITV Studios Global Entertainment.

“The film has already been garlanded with international awards and we expect it will attract a great deal of interest from buyers worldwide looking for the best nature programming at MIPCOM.”

Th UK screenings are listed below;

Tues 11 Nov, 6pm – Chapter, Cardiff
Sat 15 Nov, 11.40am – Glasgow Film Theatre
Mon 17 Nov, 8pm – Plaza Community Centre, Liverpool
Tues 25 Nov, 6.30pm – The Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford
Mon 1 Dec, 8pm – The Electric Theatre, Guildford
Tues 9 Dec, 8.30pm – Colchester Arts Centre
Mon 15 Dec, 8pm – Whirled, Brixton

Book tickets here

ADI are now currently rescuing lions from circuses in Peru. Read more HERE

Read a field guide to lions, which includes details on their habitat, diet and threats, HERE

For more information on Lion Ark click HERE

African lions are headed toward extinction and may be wiped out soon, according to an analysis from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service that on Monday proposed categorizing them as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act: here.

Whale exhibition in Denver, USA


This video from the American Museum of Natural History in New York City says about itself:

11 February 2013

Whales: Giants of the Deep” brings visitors closer than ever to some of the mightiest, most massive, and mysterious mammals on Earth. Featuring life-size models, interactive exhibits, and films—as well as more than 20 stunning whale skulls and skeletons—the family-friendly exhibition also reveals the history of the close relationship between humans and whales, from the traditions of Maori whale riders to the whaling industry and later rise of laws protecting whales from commercial hunters.

Originally developed at Te Papa Tongarewa, the national museum of New Zealand, the exhibition will also feature rarely viewed specimens from the Museum’s own world-class collections.

From CBS in the USA:

Whales: Giants Of The Deep Opens At DMNS In October

September 26, 2014 8:28 PM

DENVER (CBS4) – The skeleton of a 58-foot sperm whale is one of 20 whale specimens that will be shown as part of a new exhibition at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science that opens next month.

The exhibit, called Whales: Giants of the Deep, is on tour from the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, which boasts one of the largest collections of marine mammals in the world.

The exhibit will also feature life-sized models, digital interactives and rare artifacts. DMNS said visitors can crawl through a life-sized replica of a blue whale’s heart, touch whale teeth and hear the sounds whales use to navigate, communicate and find food.

The exhibit opens Oct. 10 and is free with museum admission.