Neo-nazi synagogue bombing plot, Colorado, USA


This 4 November 2019 video from Colorado, USA says about itself:

Richard Holzer Arrested In Plot To Blow Up Pueblo’s Temple Emanuel [synagogue]

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

In the United States a man was arrested who wanted to commit an attack on a synagogue. The 27-year-old man from the state of Colorado is said to have planned a bomb attack on the Temple Emanuel Synagogue in Pueblo city, south of Denver. Court documents show that he wanted to unleash a “racial holy war”.

Richard Holzer was arrested last weekend after he accepted 14 dynamite sticks and two pipe bombs from some men and women about whom he thought they supported him. That turned out to be undercover FBI agents and the explosives turned out to be fake. He is said to have intended to commit the attack that day.

According to the FBI, Holzer told the agents that he is a skinhead and that he used to be a member of the Ku Klux Klan. He is said to have glorified violence on Facebook and spread messages in which he recommended white supremacy.

Mein Kampf

He is also said to have been very anti-Semitic on several occasions in his contact with the undercover agents. When he met one of them, he was “wearing a Nazi armband” according to the FBI. He is also said to have had the book Mein Kampf [by Adolf Hitler] with him.

See also here.

White Supremacist Arrested For Plot To Blow Up Colorado Synagogue … Holzer also used racial slurs to refer to Latino people: here.

A group of men wearing large white kippas and tallesim handed out fliers promoting Holocaust denial and hung up cards bearing anti-Semitic canards on a pedestrian mall in Boulder, Colorado. The fliers handed out at Boulder’s Pearl Street Mall by the men who appeared to be posing as Jews claimed the Holocaust was “impossible”. The men also hung notes on index cards around the mall that claimed “Academia is dominated by Marxist Jews”, Jews run the porn industry,” and “Jews ran the Atlantic slave trade,” the Daily Camera newspaper reported: here.

In addition to Holzer, at least 12 other people have been arrested for participating in plots to attack Jews since the Tree of Life shooting, according to the Anti-Defamation League. The ADL reports that incidents targeting Jews surged 57 percent in 2017. In the first half of this year, the ADL recorded 780 anti-Semitic episodes across the US: here.

Richard Holzer (Facebook)

This Week Proves It: Anti-Semitism On The Right Is The Only Real Threat To Jews: here.

Hummingbirds’ mating season displays, new study


This video from the USA says about itself:

Broad-tailed Hummingbird – Colorado Rocky Mountains

Nature and birds of Snowmass Village, Colorado (late June/July [2012]). Featured closeup of Broad-tailed Hummingbird (at 2:50). Opening scenes from the ridge on Hanging Valley Wall looking south to Sievers Mountain and west to Willoughby Mountain, Clark Peak, and Hagerman Peak. Birds shown are Horned Lark, Eremophila alpestris; Northern Flicker, Colaptes auratus; Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Regulus calendula; male Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Selasphorus platycerus; Cordilleran Flycatcher, Empidonax occidentalis; House Wren, Troglodytes aedon; American Robin adult and juvenile, Turdus migratorius; Slate-colored Fox-Sparrow, Pasarella iliaca; MacGillivray’s Warbler, Oporornis tomei.

From Princeton University in the USA:

Dive-bombing for love: Male hummingbirds dazzle females with a highly synchronized display

December 18, 2018

Summary: Male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds perform dramatic aerial courtship dives to impress females. In a new study, scientists have shown that diving males closely time key events to produce a burst of signals for the viewer. They synchronize maximal horizontal speed, loud noises generated with their tail feathers, and a display of their iridescent throat-patch (gorget), performed in a mere 300 milliseconds — roughly the duration of a human blink.

When it comes to flirting, animals know how to put on a show. In the bird world, males often go to great lengths to attract female attention, like peacocks shaking their tail feathers and manakins performing complex dance moves. These behaviors often stimulate multiple senses, making them hard for biologists to quantify.

Hummingbirds are no exception when it comes to snazzy performances, as males of many species perform spectacular courtship dives. Broad-tailed hummingbirds (Selasphorus platycercus) fly up to 100 feet in the air before sweeping down toward a perched female, then climb back up for a subsequent dive in the opposite direction. At the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colorado, home to a population of breeding broad-tailed hummingbirds, researchers from Princeton University have been investigating how hummingbirds combine speed, sound and color in their displays. Their work appears in the Dec. 18 issue of the journal Nature Communications.

“The dives are truly amazing feats for such small birds”, said Benedict Hogan, a postdoctoral research associate in ecology and evolutionary biology and the study’s lead author. “We know from previous work that the males can reach really high speeds. They combine that speed with intriguing noises generated by their wing and tail feathers, and of course with their brightly iridescent plumage.” But how do these different components fit together, and what might a dive sound like and look like to a female?

To explore this, Hogan and Mary Caswell Stoddard, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and the study’s senior author, created video and audio recordings of 48 dives performed by wild male broad-tailed hummingbirds. They then used image-tracking software to estimate each male’s trajectory and speed throughout the dive. Combining these estimates with the audio data, the researchers measured the precise time at which the males produce a mechanical “buzz” with their tail feathers.

To incorporate information about iridescent plumage color, which is difficult to extract from the video recordings, the team headed to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Using a multi-angle imaging technique and an ultraviolet-sensitive camera, they photographed broad-tailed hummingbird specimens. Hummingbirds are tetrachromatic — their eyes have four color cones, one of which is sensitive to ultraviolet wavelengths — so by combining the photographs with a model of hummingbird color vision and details of the U-shaped flight path, the researchers were able to estimate a female “bird’s-eye view” of the male’s iridescent throat feathers.

Putting it all together, Hogan and Stoddard could determine how the events in a hummingbird’s dive unfold.

“We discovered that the most dramatic aspects of the dive — high speed, the mechanical buzz and a rapid iridescent color change — happen almost all at once, just before the male soars past the female”, said Stoddard. “These aerial acrobats deliver an in-your-face sensory explosion.”

First, the male starts the tail-generated buzz. Then his bright red throat feathers become visible to the female and quickly appear to change to black, due to his speed and orientation. During this time, the male reaches top horizontal speed. Because of his high speed, the researchers estimate that a female will perceive an upward and then downward shift in pitch as he approaches and departs.

“This is due to the Doppler effect, the same phenomenon responsible for the perceived change in pitch as a car with its horn blaring drives past you,” said Hogan.

All of these key events occur in a 300-millisecond window, roughly the duration of a human blink.

How much does the timing matter to females? That needs more study, say the researchers. For now, they can only hypothesize about the different elements of the dive display. The tightly synchronized moves might provide information about the male’s health or tap into a female’s aesthetic preferences. Whatever the explanation, the team emphasized the importance of considering timing and motion in animal courtship signals.

“In the real world, many animals strut their stuff in complex, dynamic ways”, said Stoddard. “Whether it’s a diving hummingbird or a dancing peacock spider, we need to account for motion and orientation to understand how these remarkable displays evolved.”

African American woman makes neonazi a non-nazi


This ABC video from the USA says about itself:

Former neo-Nazi removes swastika tattoos after unlikely friendship

26 September 2017

Colorado resident Michael Kent recently sat down at a tattoo parlor in Colorado Springs to have his swastikas covered up.

Kent, a former neo-Nazi, credits an African-American parole officer named Tiffany Whittier with helping him to see beyond skin color and changing his views about white supremacy.

“If it wasn’t for her I would have seeped back into it,” said Kent. “I look at her as family.”

Whittier, 45, even inspired Kent, 38, to take down the Nazi flags he had hanging in his living room and replace them with smiley faces.

“I’m not here to judge him. That’s not my job to judge. My job is to be that positive person in someone’s life,” Whittier said.

Added Kent, “When you wake up and see a smiley face, you’re going to go to work and you’re going to smile.”

Kent now works full-time on a chicken farm in Colorado, where all his co-workers are Hispanic.

“Before all this, I wouldn’t work for anybody or with anybody that wasn’t white”, said Kent. “[Now] we have company parties, or they have quinceañeras, I’m the only white guy there!”

Redemption Ink, a national non-profit that offers free removals of hate-related tattoos, helped connect Kent with Fallen Heroes Tattoo in Colorado to begin the 15-hour process of covering his swastikas. The sterile environment is new to Kent who had his previous ink work done in prison. “I’ve never, never, never been inside of a tattoo shop getting a professional tattoo,” he said.

Kent believes the painful process will help him move forward after spending years as a member of a violent skinhead group based in Arizona. As a father of two young children, Kent also hopes his children will see the world differently. “I don’t want my kids to live the life I lived and live with hate,” said Kent. “I want my kids to know me for who I am now—a good father, a hard worker, and a good provider.”

Triceratops dinosaur fossil discovery in Colorado, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

4 September 2017

Construction workers in Colorado made an incredible discovery when their heavy machinery hit an ‘immovable’ object—a rare triceratops fossil.

Dinosaur bone discovered at Colorado, USA bike trail


This video from the USA says about itself:

Part 1: Triceratops femur excavation, Baker, Montana

29 July 2014

On a private ranch, purchased from owner.

These two videos arte the sequels.

From KUSA-TV in the USA:

Man planning bike trail finds dinosaur bones instead

Miles Moraitis, KUSA

4:33 PM. MDT August 02, 2017

Imagine hiking on a trail and stumbling upon dinosaur bones. Well that’s exactly what happened to a Colorado land management official when he was walking and planning out the new Palisade Plunge bike trail near Grand Junction.

In April, Chris Pipkin of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) was surveying the new Palisade trail. He saw something strange in a boulder about five feet off the trail. Curious, he took a photo and sent it to his colleague Eric Eckberg. He confirmed it was indeed a dinosaur bone.

Eckberg is a geologist and paleontology coordinator for the BLM in Grand Junction. Upon receiving the photo, he mobilized a group of local paleontologists and even some BLM interns to help excavate the bone.

“It’s in remarkably good shape for something that’s roughly 80 million years old,” Eckberg said.

The bone is two feet long and about two inches around.

Eckberg says it likely belonged to a hadrosaur — a group of dinosaurs known for their duck-bills. Their bones have been found before in this area.

“It’s kind of one of those career defining moments for me in a way,” Eckberg said. “You don’t get to go and extract a dinosaur bone that often.”

The bone will now head to the Museum of West Denver. Experts will take a look at it and try to determine exactly what dinosaur it came from. They could even figure out how the dinosaur died.

That process takes a while though. The museum doesn’t expect the bone to go on display for at least a couple months.

Bighorn sheep in Colorado, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

22 April 2017

A bachelor group or band of male Colorado bighorn sheep ranging from youngsters all the way up to the mature male leader. Their gray coloring makes them very hard to see among the boulders and sparse vegetation around 8,000 feet elevation. Filmed near the Arkansas River in Cotopaxi, Colorado.