Genocide of thousands of native American children in Canada


This video from Canada says about itself:

UNREPENTANT: Kevin Annett and Canada’s Genocide (Documentary)

7 December 2013

This award winning documentary reveals Canada’s darkest secret – the deliberate extermination of indigenous (Native American) peoples and the theft of their land under the guise of religion. This never before told history as seen through the eyes of this former minister (Kevin Annett) who blew the whistle on his own church, after he learned of thousands of murders in its Indian Residential Schools.

GET A DIGITAL DOWNLOAD: here.

First-hand testimonies from residential school survivors are interwoven with Kevin Annett’s own story of how he faced firing, de-frocking, and the loss of his family, reputation and livelihood as a result of his efforts to help survivors and bring out the truth of the residential schools.

Best Director Award at the 2006 New York Independent Film and Video Festival, and Best International Documentary at the 2006 Los Angeles Independent Film Festival

LEARN MORE here.

Produced By Louie Lawless, Kevin Annett and Lorie O’Rourke

2006

From daily The Independent in Britain:

6,000 aboriginal children died in ‘cultural genocide‘ in Canadian residential school system, officials say

‘If anybody tried to do this today, they would easily be subject to prosecution under the genocide convention’

Louis Doré

Saturday 30 May 2015

At least 6,000 aboriginal children died while in the residential school system in Canada, in a “cultural genocide”, officials have said.

Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, who is responsible for studying the legacy of the residential schools, said the figure is an estimate and the true figure could be much higher.

“We think that we have not uncovered anywhere near what the total would be because the record keeping around that question was very poor,” Sinclair told Rosemary Barton of CBC‘s Power & Politics. “You would have thought they would have concentrated more on keeping track.”

The new death toll comes after comments from the chief justice of the Supreme Court, Beverley McLachlin, who said that Canada attempted to commit “cultural genocide” against aboriginal peoples.

“The most glaring blemish on the Canadian historic record relates to our treatment of the First Nations that lived here at the time of colonization,” McLachlin said.

Canada, she said, sustained an “ethos of exclusion and cultural annihilation”, an assessment which Justice Sinclair agreed with.

“I think as commissioners we have concluded that cultural genocide is probably the best description of what went on here.

“If anybody tried to do this today, they would easily be subject to prosecution under the genocide convention.”

More wader news from England


This video from Canada says about itself:

White-rumped Sandpiper (feeding and preening)

White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis, Vitgumpsnäppa) and Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla, Sandsnäppa), Tommy Thompson Park (Leslie Street Spit), Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 6 June 2010. Digiscoped with a Swarovski ATM-80 HD spotting scope and a Casio Exilim EX-Z750 snapshot camera using the Swarovski digital camera base (DCB) adapter.

From Rare Bird Network on Twitter in Britain today:

Linc[oln]s[hire]: WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER 1 still at RSPB Frampton Marsh. Also Temminck’s Stint & Curlew Sandpiper.

The white-rumped sandpiper is in capital letters, being a North American bird, rare in Europe.

African American civil rights singer Mavis Staples interviewed


This video says about itself:

Mavis! – Documentary Trailer

Her family group, the Staple Singers, inspired millions and helped propel the civil rights movement with their music. After 60 years of performing, legendary singer Mavis Staples’ message of love and equality is needed now more than ever.

Mavis!, the first documentary about Mavis Staples and the Staple Singers is directed by Jessica Edwards. The film will have it’s world premiere at the 2015 South By Southwest Film Festival and will screen at the Full Frame Documentary Festival and Hot Docs.

From CBC radio in Canada:

Monday April 27, 2015

Mavis Staples on crafting a soundtrack for the civil rights era

In a special two-part interview, Mavis Staples joins Shad to discuss her decades-long career, her family’s role in the civil rights movement and why — in the aftermath of Ferguson — we must collectively heed the lessons of history.

The legendary gospel/soul singer and civil rights activist is the subject of a new documentary titled Mavis!, screening at this year’s Hot Docs Festival. She tells Shad it was time to put the Staples story on the record, and “let the world know pops and his daughters were here”.

Staples also weighs in on the lack of modern day freedom songs, tells the back story of the hit song “Why am I treated so bad?”, and sets the record straight on why she turned down Bob Dylan‘s marriage proposal.

This music video from Switzerland says about itself:

Staple Singers – Why Am I Treated So Bad

Montreux Jazz Festival 1981 with Roebuck Staples on solo and Michael Logan on keyboards

“How do you start a conversation with children on America’s legacy of racial injustice? You tell them the story of an artist who confronted segregation and exposed that legacy. A new picture book, Gordon Parks: How the Photographer Captured Black and White America, takes on the admirable task of translating challenging material to readers ages five to eight. Written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by Jamey Christoph, the book traces Parks’ journey from Fort Scott, Kansas, to Washington, D.C., as he nurtured his interest in photography as a way to document and expose oppression in the United States.” (Read more here)

Sea otters in Canada, video


This video says about itself:

Sea Otters vs. Urchins in Canada’s Kelp Forests

7 April 2015

“When you see a sea otter, they’re usually either eating or digesting,” often munching on urchins, says ecologist Anne Salomon, a Pew marine fellow. That’s a good thing for some kelp beds. Without otters to control urchin numbers, the spiky shellfish can devour the beds, leaving barren seascapes behind.

Fifty years ago, sea otters were so sought after for their fur that they disappeared from the Canadian coast. But now they’re bouncing back and—as seen in this video—competing with humans for the region’s shellfish.

Thayer’s gull, first ever in the Netherlands


This video from Ireland is called Juvenile Thayer’s Gull at Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh – 3rd February 2012. Also in this video: an adult herring gull, and (smaller) black-headed gulls in winter plumage.

Translated from Dutch Birding:

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Last weekend for the first time ever a Thayer’s gull was seen in the Netherlands. Birder Leon Edelaar discovered the bird on the coast of Egmond aan Zee where it sat among other gulls. Birdwatchers from the Netherlands and abroad meanwhile flocked to see the special gull too.

According to photos, this is a young gull.

Thayer’s gulls nest in the high Arctic of Canada, and usually winter along the west coast of North America; very rarely in western Europe.