New beetles discovered in Borneo


This video says about itself:

A documentary exploring the diversity and conservation of one of the world’s last remaining true wildernesses, Maliau Basin in Borneo. Filmed Jan – March 2016 by Matt Jarvis.

Recently, there was an expedition by Naturalis museum in the Netherlands to the Maliau Basin in Sarawak in Malaysia, on Borneo island. They discovered five beetle species, new for science.

Probably, they discovered many more species new for science. However, the scientists in the expedition were specialists of some beetle families and did not know everything on other beetles and animals. So, further research on what they found may discover much more.

An extensive web site, in Dutch, about the expedition is here.

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Captive orangutan freed


This video from Borneo says about itself:

Orangutan Kept In Small Box For Weeks Is FINALLY Free

15 October 2017

Orangutan Kept In Box For Days Is SO HAPPY To Be Free | This orangutan was kept in a crate for two weeks, just because she got too close to someone’s land. To sponsor the ongoing care of Isin the rescued orangutan, you can support International Animal Rescue.

Blonde rescued orangutan named Alba


This video from Borneo in Indonesia says about itself:

Meet Alba, the Albino Orangutan

15 May 2017

Following a global campaign to help us find a special name for the 5-year old albino orangutan, BOS Foundation is delighted to announce that this little girl is named Alba, which means ‘white’ in Latin and ‘dawn’ in Spanish. Hopefully a new dawn will come for these precious animals. The name Alba was selected from thousands of suggestions sent from around the world at name@orangutan.or.id or on social media quoting the hashtag #albinoorangutan.

A veterinarian says that in the ten days since Alba was saved from her captors, being very thin then, has already added 4.5 kilos to her weight.

Blonde orangutan girl saved, name her


This video from Borneo in Indonesia says about itself:

2 May 2017

Activists rescued a rare albino orangutan that was being held captive.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Name searched for blonde blue-eyed orangutan

Today, 12:38

She is blonde, has blue eyes and is still anonymous. Last month a dehydrated and malnourished albino orangutan was found in central Borneo. Conservationists invite people to submit suggestions for a name.

The Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation hopes that the ape will become a symbol of endangered animals worldwide. The orangutan was saved from a cage in the Indonesian part of Borneo. …

Veterinarian Arga Sawung Kusuma cares for the orangutan. “She looked thinner when we found her,” he told AP. “She was stressed and collapsed. Her skin and fur did not look well and she suffered from dehydration.”

Also, the animal did not weigh enough for her age. “She looked thinner when we found her, she weighed 8.3 kilos. For a five-year-old female orangutan, that’s really very little.”

The name orangutan comes from the Malayan [orang] hutan which means forest human. The animals are genetically identical to humans for 96.4 percent.

Suggestions for a name can be submitted to 14 May to name@orangutan.org.id or via the hashtag #albinoorangutan on social media. The organization hopes that people will send “meaningful” names.

When the blonde orangutan will be healthy again, she will be freed in the wild.

See also here. And here.

Orangutans freed in Borneo rainforest


This 2012 video is called AMAZING ORANGUTAN TOUR BORNEO.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Orangutans returned to native Borneo

Monday 19th December 2016

A BRITISH charity has overseen the safe return of two critically endangered orangutans to their native Borneo, after they were taught how to live in the wild.

A team from the Orangutan Conservation Centre in West Kalimantan travelled with the pair from Britain who were previously held as pets until they were rescued.

Eight-year-old male orangutan Johnny and 10-year-old female Desi had spent more than four years at the International Animal Rescue’s (IAR) Orangutan Conservation Centre.

They learned how to climb, forage, make nests and other survival skills that are vital for their survival in the rainforest.

As soon as they were released into the wild, the apes climbed trees and foraged. A team will monitor them, making records of their progress, a spokesman for IAR said.

The International Union of Conservation of Nature recently reclassified the Bornean orangutan as critically endangered as numbers have dropped by more than 80 per cent in the last 75 years due to deforestation.

Rare marbled cats photographed in Borneo


This video says about itself:

Elusive Marbled Cat Filmed

November 21, 2011—The little-known marbled cat, whose tail is nearly the length of its body, was recently captured by a camera trap in Indonesia.

© 2011 National Geographic; video courtesy of Marten Slothouwer.

From LiveScience:

Elusive Marbled Cats Secretly Photographed in Borneo

by Laura Geggel, Staff Writer | March 23, 2016 05:39pm ET

A secret photo shoot deep in the forests of Malaysian Borneo is helping researchers determine just how many marbled cats — rare, tree-climbing felines — live in the region, according to a new study.

Marbled cats (Pardofelis marmorata) are extremely elusive creatures. To get a better idea of the cats’ stomping grounds, the researchers placed camera traps in eight forests and two palm oil plantations in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, they said.

After four months of secret, motion-triggered infrared photography, the researchers found that marbled cats are most numerous in the lowlands where the forest is undisturbed. However, they did find a few cats in selectively logged areas. [See Camera Trap Photos of the Elusive Marbled Cat]

“We show that marbled cats can still survive in logged forests,” said study lead researcher Andrew Hearn, a doctoral candidate at the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. “This lends further weight to the argument that such disturbed forests are important to the conservation of biodiversity and should be preserved wherever possible.”

Little is known about the cats, which are named for their marble-patterned fur. They live in dense tropical forests, and are rarely seen, except for the odd camera-trap sighting. Perhaps that’s because the species is listed as “near threatened,” according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) red list, largely due to habitat loss and poaching.

In the new study, the researchers used the surreptitiously taken photos to identify individual cats and estimate the species’ population density and distribution. They found that the lowland Danum Valley Conservation Area had about 19.5 cats per 39 square miles (100 square kilometers). Tawau Hills Park had fewer — about seven cats per 39 square miles. The Tabin Wildlife Reserve, which was selectively logged from 1969 to 1989, had an estimated density of about 10 cats per 39 square miles.

These estimates provide “tentative evidence” that undisturbed, lowland hill forests have the highest densities of marbled cats, Hearn said. Other areas, including disturbed lowlands and undisturbed highlands, had lower densities of the cats, he said.

The camera traps didn’t record any marbled-cat sightings within the plantations, although one cat was spotted walking along the forest-plantation boundary, the researchers added. They also photographed cubs in the Tabin North, Tawau and Ulu Segama forests.

The results of this exhaustive study suggest that the marbled-cat population may be somewhat higher in northern Borneo than it is elsewhere, but more studies are needed to verify this, Hearn said. For instance, researchers could use camera traps in other places in which the cats are found in the Indomalayan ecorealm, a region extending from eastern India and Nepal to Yunnan province, China; and throughout mainland Southeast Asia to the islands of Sumatra and Borneo. [Photos: In Images: The Rare Bay Cat of Borneo]

But enforced regulations could increase the number of Borneo’s marbled cats even more. Although poaching is illegal, the researchers found used shotgun cartridges in seven of the eight forests. However, they didn’t come across any evidence that poachers are shooting marbled cats, the scientists wrote in the study.

Laws governing logging and forest conservation may also help preserve the population of marbled cats, Hearn said.

“We provide further evidence that logged forest may still be used by these cats, and should be preserved,” he said.

The study was published online today (March 23) in the journal PLOS ONE.

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