Tunisian solidarity with Egyptian democrats, 2011


This 2011 video from Egypt says about itself:

Egyptian Body Politic: Adaptation of #Tahrir

from Laila Shereen

AN ANIMATED ADAPTATION OF “The Dream” by Alaa Abd El-Fattah, translated by Lina Attalah, 2011. Voice narration by VJ Um Amel.

A SOUNDTRACK REMIX OF “Immortal Egypt Revolution Dub” by DJ Zhao, “Amble ambience” by VJ Um Amel, KPCC radio interview of VJ Um Amel on November 23, 2011, and voice overs.

A VISUAL REMIX OF YouTube videos, Twitter data, R-Shief’s visualizations of 1.25 million tweets on #Tahrir over 23 days in November, and 1.23 million tweets on #NOSCAF over the same date range. Cartoon by Carlos Latuff, “in honour of martyr Shehab Ahmed, killed by SCAF forces in #Nov20″.

In Tunisia, demonstrators express solidarity with Egyptian democrats, attacked by the pro-United States military junta.

Egyptian workers’ solidarity with Tahrir Square: here.

King of Bahrain congratulates deposed Egyptian dictator Mubarak


This video says about itself:

Bahraini oil bought international silence & UK seized my passport’ – Nabeel Rajab

31 July 2014

Rights activists in Bahrain are accusing the authorities’ of targeting journalists trying to report on the crackdown against anti-government protests. Bahraini opposition leader Nabeel Rajab tells RT about the human rights situation in the country.

The Bahrain News agency, the official mouthpiece of the Bahraini absolute monarchy, reports:

Manama, Nov. 29 (BNA)– His Majesty King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa held today a telephone call with former Egyptian President Mohammed Hosni Mubarak, got assured about his health and congratulated him on being acquitted by the Egyptian judiciary.

That sentence is only partially true. Mubarak was acquitted today only of murdering many hundreds of demonstrators just before the fall of his dictatorship. There are still charges against Mubarak of corruption and other crimes. Nevertheless, a worrying sign in Egypt of a movement away from the Arab Spring and back to Mubarak-sstyle dictatorship.

HM the King paid tribute to the former Egyptian President for his honourable stances towards Bahrain and efforts to bolster bilateral relations, wishing him abundant good health and happiness.

This 30 November 2014 video from Egypt is about Cairo University students protesting Mubarak acquittal.

Egyptian anti-Mubarak verdict protesters tear-gassed by police: here.

Protests flare after Mubarak cleared of Arab Spring deaths: here.

The acquittal of the deposed Egyptian dictator underscores the determination of the Egyptian bourgeoisie to drown the revolutionary struggles of the working class in blood: here.

This video is called 11th Feb. 2011 – Storyful – Mubarak Resigns Egypt Cairo Tahrir celebrations Alexandria.

There appears to be the usual share of confusion about what the Mubarak trial judge just said and did. As seen on television, the judge promised his “sons in the media” flash drives containing talking points (in the neighborhood of 200 pages) to help them, he said, with their news coverage until they have had a chance to read the entire ruling. Until that summary is available, I will address here a couple of the most persistent questions so far, pending further updates: here.

On Tuesday, Egypt’s high court overturned the last remaining conviction against former dictator Hosni Mubarak, paving the way for his possible release, four years after the mass revolutionary struggles of the Egyptian working class that overthrew him: here.

The Egyptian military dictatorship of Field Marshal-President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi boasted last weekend that it had detained nearly 10,000 people over the past 12 months. This grim estimate came as Washington moved to further normalize its relationship with the regime, and as the US Congress effectively waived human rights conditions for the provision of military aid to the Cairo regime: here.

MUBARAK TO STAND TRIAL FOR PROTESTER DEATHS “Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak will face a second and final retrial over the killing of protesters during the 2011 uprising that ended his 30-year rule, a high court said on Thursday. Mubarak, 87, was originally sentenced to life in prison in 2012 for conspiring to murder 239 demonstrators, sowing chaos and creating a security vacuum during the 18-day revolt, but an appeals court ordered a retrial. In that retrial, an Egyptian court in November dropped its case against him but the public prosecution appealed that. On Thursday, Judge Anwar Gabri accepted the prosecution’s appeal and said Mubarak would be tried again on Nov. 5 by the high court. He was not present at the court. The ruling was seen as a triumph of sorts for opponents of Mubarak who perceive his treatment by the courts as too lenient.” [Reuters]

Saudis, Bahrainis protest Saudi killing of demonstrator


This 30 September 2014 is about a demonstration in Bahrain, protesting against the killing of a demonstrator in Saudi Arabia.

From Middle East Eye:

Protests erupt in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain after killing of man dubbed ‘terrorist’

Tuesday 30 September 2014 23:26 BST

An eastern province of Saudi Arabia has erupted in protest on Tuesday night after the funeral of Bassem al-Qadihi, who activists say was killed during a peaceful protest, but who Saudi authorities allege was involved in “terrorist crimes.”

While the Saudi establishment denounces peaceful demonstrators as ‘terrorists’, they have a history of supporting the real terrorists of ISIS.

Hundreds of mourners thronged the streets of the restive majority-Shiite province of Qatif in a mass funeral procession for Qadihi, amid reports of a fierce gun-battle between Saudi security forces and people protesting Qadihi’s killing.

The Saudi Interior Ministry announced on 26 September that Qadihi has been arrested, having been wanted on allegations that he launched armed attacks on civilians and security personnel and incited young people to violence.

A day later, local media reported that Qadihi had died in hospital as a result of injuries sustained during his arrest.

According to al-Akhbar, Qadihi was injured along with nine others when security forces, driving unmarked cars, fired live ammunition at a demonstration organised to protest the ongoing detention of prominent cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr.

Activists on social media told the newspaper that Qadihi was taken to hospital, but that security forces later checked him out and took him to an unknown location, where he died.

The Interior Ministry gave no statement on the incident at that time, but later announced simply that security services had tracked down the “fugitive” Qadihi, who had been “involved in leading a number of terrorist operations.”

The statement made no mention of reports that Qadihi had been killed.

Protests in the wake of Qadihi’s funeral were not limited to the eastern areas of Saudi Arabia – activists in Bahrain also took to the streets in a solidarity demonstration on Tuesday night.

They shouted “your martyr is our martyr” and carried a huge banner bearing an image of Qadihi’s face and the slogan “all solidary with you, Qatif.”

The Shiite minority of Saudi Arabia, which make up the majority of the population in Qatif, have long complained of violations of their rights by the central government.

Human Rights Watch alleges that the Saudi government “systematically discriminates against its Shiite citizens”, citing poor access to public education and government employment alongside unequal treatment in the justice system.

Bahrain election protest: Opposition group ‘occupies’ capital downtown: here.