An overview of the Rallidae of Algeria with particular reference to the breeding ecology of the Purple Swamp-Hen (Porphyrio porphyrio)


Originally posted on North African Birds:

Samraoui, F., Nedjah, R., Alfarhan, A. H., & Samraoui, B. (in press). An overview of the Rallidae of Algeria with particular reference to the breeding ecology of the Purple Swamp-Hen Porphyrio porphyrio.Wetlands Ecology and Management
doi:10.1007/s11273-014-9404-0

Abstract:

Rallids are good biological models to monitor anthropogenic changes to wetlands. The distribution of the Rallidae was mapped up during a survey of all major wetlands across Algeria and nest site selection, phenology, and breeding parameters of the Purple Swamp-Hen Porphyrio porphyrio were monitored at two distinct sites under contrasting conditions. Data were collected at Boussedra, an unprotected freshwater marsh during the years 2005 and 2008, and at Lake Tonga, a protected freshwater marsh during 2009. The onset of egg-laying was found to occur earlier (mid-February) than was recorded previously (end-March). There was much variation in the egg laying patterns and in the clutch sizes which dropped significantly…

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Phenology and diurnal behaviour of the Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata) in the Guerbes-Sanhadja wetland complex (north-eastern Algeria)


petrel41:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/wDrk6YvG6-M?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent

This is a shoveler video from England.

I was privileged to see these beautiful ducks; in western Europe, where they are not rare; and in Svalbard, where they are very rare.

Originally posted on North African Birds:

Amor Abda, W., Merzoug, S., Belhamra, M. & Houhamdi, M. (2015). Phenology and diurnal behaviour of the Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata in the Guerbes-Sanhadja wetland complex (north-eastern Algeria). Zoology and Ecology 25(1): 19–25.  DOI:10.1080/21658005.2014.994361
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

An ecological study of the Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata in the wetlands of the Guerbes-Sanhadja eco-complex (Skikda, north-eastern Algeria) which was performed during wintering season (from September 2012 to March 2013) showed that the species was regularly wintering in these ecosystems during the seven months of observation. The highest numbers were recorded during December 2012 (1943 individuals) at Garaet Hadj-Taher, although this wetland was the last to be colonized if we compare it to other wetlands. Garaet Hadj-Taher hosted more than half of the wintering population of the Northern Shoveler in the Guerbes-Sanhadja eco-complex. Sleeping activity (diurnal resting) dominated over other diurnal behaviours of this Anatidea at Garaet Hadj-Taher…

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Habitat use and distribution of the Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea) in the wetland complex of Oued Righ, Algerian Sahara


Originally posted on North African Birds:

Nouidjem, Y., Saheb, M., Bensaci, E., Bouzegag, A., Guergueb, E.-Y. & Houhamdi, M. (2015). Habitat use and distribution of the Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea in the wetland complex of Oued Righ (Algerian Sahara). Zoology and Ecology 25(1): 26–33. doi:10.1080/21658005.2014.997995
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

Our study conducted from August 2007 to May 2011 in the main wetlands of the Oued Righ complex (Eastern Sahara of Algeria) aimed to study the habitat use and distribution pattern of the Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea. As the species was recorded breeding at most sites of the wetland complex, it was given the resident breeder status, which differs from the one it had previously. The maximum number of Ruddy Shelducks (284 individuals) was recorded each year during the winter season (second half of December). The Ruddy Shelduck (60% of population) shows preference for shallow middle-sized salt ponds with a high proportion of open…

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Blackbird sings in garden, video


This is a video of as blackbird singing in a garden in the Netherlands.

Rose Marie Herpers made the video.

Breeding phenology of Common Blackbird in palm groves at an oasis in Algeria: here.

Saving cheetahs in the Sahara


This video is called This Is Why You Can’t Outrun a Cheetah.

From Wildlife Extra:

New research could help the critically endangered Saharan cheetah survive

The critically endangered Saharan cheetah, of which fewer than 250 individuals remain, requires vast areas to survive and adapt their behaviour to cope with the harsh desert environment scientists have discovered. They are active at night, probably to avoid heat or contact with humans, and must cover a vast amount of ground to find prey.

Scientists and conservationists at WCS, ZSL, University College London, UK, and Université de Béjaïa, Algeria, in collaboration with the Office National du Parc Culturel de l’Ahaggarthe, used infra-red camera traps to monitor Saharan cheetahs at Ahaggar Cultural Park, Algeria.

“This is the first time we have been able to collect scientific data on the rare Saharan cheetah, as in the past we have had to rely on anecdotes and guesswork,” said Farid Belbachir, lead-author from Laboratoire d’Ecologie et Environnement, Université de Béjaïa, Algeria.

“We hope that this important carnivore does not follow the path to extinction like other Algerian desert species such as the addax antelope and dama gazelle.”

This research into how the cheetah survives extreme desert conditions gives scientists a better understanding of how best to approach their conservation.

Dr Sarah Durant, co-author from WCS and ZSL, said: “This research provides us with important new insights into the world of this remarkable desert-dwelling large cat. I hope that it not only provides invaluable scientific information about the ecology of the Saharan cheetah for the first time but also reminds the world of the value of studying and protecting desert species and their environments, which are often overlooked by researchers and conservation programs.”

Confined to desert environments, the Saharan cheetah lives in pockets of north and west Africa. The report shows that Saharan cheetahs are more nocturnal, more wide-ranging and occur at lower densities than other cheetahs living in Africa.