Pioneer punk drums woman gets badge back


Lou's badge

In November 2020, Dutch visual artist Marion van Egmond has reconstructed the original 1977 badges of pioneer all-women punk band the Lou’s. She made 5 big and 5 small glow-in-the-dark badges.

Today, Ms Bauke van der Lee came to fetch two badges, one for Lou’s drummer Syama (aka Saskia, Sascha) de Jong, and one for herself. Ms de Jong is in isolation because of the coronavirus danger. Only outside contact is Bauke who brings her groceries.

Bauke van der Lee in 1980 became roadie of Cheap ‘n’ Nasty. She got a copy today of the Cheap ‘n’ Nasty Cover girl EP. She used to play her original copy lots of times. But she lived in squats and had to move house again and again as police evicted squatters. Then, she lost her EP,

The other half of the Cheap ‘n’ Nasty road crew, Ms Dorith Ligtvoet, was present as well to get her Covergirl EP. In 1980, these two were 15-year-old secondary school girls, If, after the coronavirus danger, Cheap ‘n’ Nasty would reunite after almost 40 years (a world record), they said, then they would happily move instruments and amps again.

In 1980, Ms van Egmond was one of four 12-13-year-old girls, the youngest punk band in the world. Younger than Eater. Dutch national radio interviewed them. But the drummer’s father did not want his daughter to play. And so, Marion’s and her bandmates’ plan to play a support set to British band Crass and Poison Girls and Dutch Cheap ‘n’ Nasty did not happen.

Pioneer punk rock women Lou’s badges reconstructed


This music video (only audio, unfortunately) is the Lou’s playing their song Back on the street.

The Lou’s were the first punk band in France, and the first all-women rock band in any genre in France.

They were Dutch Sascha (aka Saskia, Syama) de Jong on drums, and three Frenchwomen: Raphaelle Devins on rhythm guitar, Tolim Toto on bass and Pamela Popo, vocals and lead guitar.

They were the only band playing on both days of the 1977 Mont de Marsan punk festival.

This video shows British band the Damned at that festival.

The Lous were support band to the Clash during the 1977 Out of Control tour in the UK.

In 1978, they played with Public Image Limited.

In 1978-1979, Sascha became drummer, and Raphaelle saxophone player, in London band Verdict. They played much for Rock against Racism.

Meanwhile, Pamela and Tolim founded Les Rois Fainéants in France.

In 1981, Sascha was back in her native Leiden, the Netherlands. She founded the all-girl Miami Beach Girls.

This is a live video of the Miami Beach Girls playing their song Delight in Utrecht in 1981.

Raphaelle came to Leiden as well, playing saxophone in Cheap ‘n’ Nasty.

Now, in November 2020, Dutch visual artist Marion van Egmond has reconstructed the original 1977 Lou’s badges. Today, there are 5 big and 5 small glow-in-the dark badges.

Lou's badge

In 1980, Ms van Egmond was one of four 12-13-year-old girls, the youngest punk band in the world. Younger than Eater. Dutch national radio interviewed them. But the drummer’s father did not want his daughter to play. And so, Marion’s and her bandmates’ plan to play a support set to British band Crass and Poison Girls and Dutch Cheap ‘n’ Nasty did not happen.

Miami Beach Girls all-women Dutch punk, videos


This music video is Delight, by the all-women punk band Miami Beach Girls, from Leiden, the Netherlands. It was one of four of their songs, recorded live at a protest concert for keeping a squat music venue open, on 11 September 1981 in Utrecht for the Onutrechtse Toestanden compilation album.

They had been founded in spring 1981 by drummer Saskia (ex-Lou’s), singer Ria (also Cheap ‘n’ Nasty drummer), guitarist Francine and bass player Andrea. Soon, Jeanette joined on keyboard and backing vocals. As this five-piece band, they made their 1981 recordings.

This video is the Miami Beach Girls’ song Tell you what recorded live at the same 1981 Utrecht concert.

On this video (audio really), at 18:35, there is the Miami Beach Girls’ song Screwdriver, recorded live at the Melkweg (Milky Way) in Amsterdam, on 1 September 1983.

That song was also one of two songs in this 1981 video. Compared with then, they had become a three-piece. Francine and Ria had left, and Jeanette had become not only keyboard player but also the lead vocalist. Saskia/Syama was still the drummer. Heleen (1981-1982 Cheap ‘n’ Nasty bass player) had taken over on bass from Andrea in 1982.

Miami Beach Girls, Dutch all-women band


This November 1981 music video shows the Dutch all-women band, the Miami Beach Girls from Leiden, playing two songs: Screwdriver, and Angels from hell.

The songs sound a bit Siouxsie and the Banshees-ish, a bit more so than usual for this band. Together, in the car of drummer Saskia (ex-Lou’s), they had gone to the Banshees open-air concert in Tiel, on 7 July 1981. And right after that, to the Banshees concerts in Paradiso in Amsterdam. Their keyboard player/backing vocalist Jeanette photographed there for punk fanzine Pin. Did these concerts inspire them?

Miami Beach Girls singer Ria was sometimes drummer of the punk band Cheap ‘n’ Nasty. A band for which bass player Andrea sometimes also played bass.

I asked Siouxsie: your lyrics are all about different subjects. Do they still have something in common? Siouxsie: Personal independence. That idea is also in the Miami Beach Girls lyrics in this video: ‘I’m not your shadow projection …’

Also in this video, interview with Jeanette. She says she is a feminist, but critical of lack of humour within feminism.

Women-hating Saudi regime´s cynical ´feminism washing´


Imprisoned Saudi Arabian women's rights activist Loujain al-Hathloul

Polluting corporations and governments do ´greenwashing´.

Similarly, misogynistic regimes do ´feminism washing´.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain, 20 October 2020:

Rights groups dismayed by Saudi‘s hosting of a women’s rights summit while activists remain behind bars

RIGHTS organisations expressed their dismay today at Saudi Arabia’s hosting of an international women’s summit while women’s rights activists remain locked up there.

The Women 20 summit (W20) had its virtual launch in the autocratic kingdom today and will run until Thursday, ahead of the G20 leaders’ summit next month.

According to its website, W20 aims to “share and scale solutions to women’s empowerment through (financial, digital inclusion and labour) inclusion, inclusive decision-making and entrepreneurship.”

But campaigners called out the hypocrisy of the Saudi government’s claims to be securing gender equality while women such as Loujain al-Hathloul, Nassima al-Sadah, Samar Badawi and Nouf Abdulaziz are imprisoned — for advocating women’s rights.

“While courageous women are subjected to torture for peaceful activities, the Saudi government seeks to assert itself on the international stage as a ‘reforming’ power”, said Human Rights Watch researcher Hiba Zayadin.

In an open letter penned last week, Amnesty called on attendees not to help the Saudi government whitewash its international reputation.

“Amnesty International urges you to use your leverage at the W20 meetings … to call on the Saudi Arabian authorities to immediately and unconditionally release all Saudi women human rights defenders in detention,” the letter said.

Runaway teenage girls in songs


This 1979 video from England is the song Girl on the run by young punk singer Honey Bane.

Honey Bane herself was on the run from a Borstal-like prison.

Teenage girls sometimes have very good reasons to run away: domestic abuse, imprisonment, etc.

Then they often go from the countryside to cities.

However, in the cities, they may get new problems.

This 1982 music video from England is the song Strange little girl, by the Stranglers.

The song was written in 1975 but only came out seven years later. This means discrepancy between the song and the video. In 1975, there were not yet the punk girls with Mohican hairdos shown in the video.

There is also a discrepancy between lyrics like: ‘She’s feeling old/’Cause she found/All things cold’ and the video images of the runaway girl discovering new punk friends in the city. By the way, the tallest girl, with the red letters on her white t-shirt under her black leather jacket, on the right of the video: is the bass player/vocalist of Dutch band Cheap ‘n’ Nasty.

Trump wants even more far-right Supreme Court


This 23 September 2020 United States TV video is called What Amy Coney Barrett said about filling a Supreme Court seat in an election year.

From UltraViolet in the USA today:

News just broke that Donald Trump is going to name Amy Coney Barrett to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court.

We knew the pick would be bad. But this one is truly awful.

Preapproved by the far-right-wing Federalist Society, Barrett wants to dismantle, if not demolish, Roe v. Wade. She opposes birth control.1 She’s even ruled in favor of “separate but equal” accommodations on the basis of race.2

RBG hasn’t even been buried yet. We’re all still mourning her passing.3 But Trump is pushing forward with a stunningly hypocritical power grab just four years after Republicans blocked President Obama from filling a Supreme Court seat that came open in February of an election year. Let’s be clear, Barrett is a disaster for women’s rights and progress, and it’s an insult to the champion we had in RBG to confirm her to the Court.

Barrett would cement a 6–3 majority on the Court for decades, which would give them a generation or more to tear down RBG’s life’s work and take our nation backward. We can’t let that happen.

This is a five-alarm fire. Will you chip in $5 to help organize a massive outcry and stop Trump from replacing RBG with right-wing extremist Amy Coney Barrett?

Mere hours after learning of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, Mitch McConnell promised a vote on Trump’s nominee. It’s no surprise from the man who stole a Supreme Court seat from Barack Obama in 2016.

If McConnell and Trump have their way, a conservative majority deeply out of step with the American people could rule for decades, eliminating the right to choose, climate pollution rules, the Affordable Care Act, voting rights, and civil rights. . . the list is long and horrifying. Women will be especially affected, particularly women of color and transwomen. Our literal lives are on the lines.

Most alarming: Trump said earlier this week that he wants his appointee confirmed before Nov. 3 so they could rule him the winner of the election, no matter what the voters say.4 …

–Shaunna, KaeLyn, Kathy, Melody, Lindsay, Sonja, Kimberly, Maria, Katie, Iris, KD, and Elisa, the UltraViolet team

Sources:

1. Planned Parenthood Condemns Amy Coney Barrett Nomination to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, Planned Parenthood, October 31, 2017

2. Profile of a potential nominee: Amy Coney Barrett, SCOTUSblog, September 21, 2020

3. All the Details on Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Funeral, Town & Country, September 25, 2020

4. Trump says he wants a conservative majority on the Supreme Court in case of an Election Day dispute. The New York Times, September 23, 2020

NASA sends woman to moon, which woman?


This 2018 video says about itself:

Moon 101 | National Geographic

What is the moon made of, and how did it form? Learn about the moon’s violent origins, how its phases shaped the earliest calendars, and how humans first explored Earth’s only natural satellite half a century ago.

NASA PLANNING TO SEND FIRST WOMAN TO THE MOON IN 2024 NASA revealed this week that it plans to send a woman to the moon for the first time in 2024. The Artemis Plan describes the first lunar mission since 1972 aimed at sending a man and the first woman to Earth’s nearest neighbor. “Sending human explorers 250,000 miles to the Moon, then 140 million miles to Mars, requires a bold vision, effective program management, funding for modern systems development and mission operations, and support from all corners of our great nation as well as our partners across the globe,” NASA said in the plan’s introduction. [HuffPost]

So, now the question is: Which woman will be sent to the moon? Some people in the USA might suggest: Ann Coulter, provided it is a one-way ticket.

And which man? Donald Trump, same condition?

Women in Indonesian punk rock


This 2016 video says about itself:

A documentary about women in the Indonesian Hardcore/Punk scene.

Now with English subtitles.

My Indonesian correspondent Ari writes today:

The involvement of women has been quite strong in Indonesia, but it’s hard to generalize across the board. For example, the straight-edge punk scene might have fewer women involved as musicians

That may be the case in various countries, maybe because of Christian right or Hare Krishna fundamentalist religious influences in straight-edge.

whereas the crust punk scene might have more female singers.

And then there will be variations across the localities, too; Jakarta vs. Bandung vs. Yogyakarta vs. Padang.

But since I have been out of Indonesia since 2009, I cannot give you a fair assessment of the scenes. There is a documentary made by Indonesian punk women about women in the Indonesian punk scenes called Ini Scene Kami Juga (This is Our Scene, Too/ 2016). What I can tell you is that there have been prominent women in the (DIY) punk scenes such as Kartika Jahja (singer of the band The Dissidents) who also contributed to the edited anthology Revenge of the She Punks (2019).

History of punk in Indonesia: here.

Women referees, first in South American football


THis 2014 video is about women’s football in Argentina.

The COVID-19 pandemic is terrible, killing many people and ruining the health of many others.

Still, it has some positive sides, eg, for wildlife.

It has some positive sides for women’s rights as well.

NOS radio reports today that for the first time ever, women have been admitted as referees in (male) Copa Libertadores matches, the highest level international matches for South American football clubs.

At one match, there were supposed to be four male referees. But they all tested positive for coronavirus. So, referee Mariana de Almeida stepped in.

At another match, the same problem. Daiana Milone from Argentina solved it.