Dutch government’s Islamophobic anti-women plan


This 2011 video is called Burqa Ban: Muslim full-face cover now crime in France.

In the Netherlands, there are about a hundred women wearing what is called in the media a ‘burqa’.

Overwhelmingly, these are Afghan women, who, during the 1980s came, mostly with their husbands, as refugees from the pro-Soviet government then in Afghanistan, to the Low Countries. In the families of these women, the view prevailed that the Kabul government of the pro-Soviet Union People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan, should be overthrown violently in order to replace it with a government interpreting Islam in a harsh way, including against women’s rights (as it later became under the Taliban, and basically is now, under the governments helped into office by George W Bush’s 2001 invasion).

Then, in the 1980s, no one in the Netherlands dreamt about yelling at those asylum seeking women: “Take off that burqa!” No politician proposed an “anti-burqa” law. The political Right, the allies of then United States president Ronald Reagan, saw Osama bin Laden, Mullah Omar, and other fanatically religious people fighting “godless communism” in Afghanistan as valuable allies of NATO’s “free world”, including the Netherlands. While the political Left said that refugees, of whatever religious or political hue, should not be harassed.

Afghan chadaris

There is a big problem in all this talk of ‘burqas’ now in 2016. These Afghan garments are chadaris (chadris); not burqas. Real burqas are a different type of clothes for some elite women in Pakistan. There probably are extremely few women in Western countries wearing a real (Pakistani upper class) burqa.

The anti-burqa measures are also not really aimed at the small numbers of Afghan refugee women wearing, not real burqas, but Afghan chadaris. As we said, these women are about 100 in the Netherlands; maybe a few hundred more in a bigger country like France. Not even the most demagogic Islamophobe could make a credible case about the horrible dangers of “Islamization” out of such small numbers.

The anti-burqa laws are about intimidating the much bigger numbers of women wearing, not burqas, not Afghan chadaris, but other, less conspicuous, clothes rightly or wrongly considered “Islamic”, like headscarves. No, the aim of those laws is even wider: it is also to intimidate the big numbers of women, originally from Turkey, Morocco, as refugees from Bush’s wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, etc. who do not even wear headscarves. No, I should say, the aim is still wider: it is to intimidate the whole working class, “autochthonous” or “allochtonous” and to divide it along sectarian religious lines. A divided, intimidated working class, Rightists like ex-President Sarkozy of France calculate, would make it easier to take lots of money away from not so well off people and give it to extremely well off people like corrupt businesswoman Ms Bettencourt who financed corrupt Sarkozy and his corrupt political party.

‘Burqa’ banning politicians like Sarkozy basically are just as anti-women as Afghan warlords making burqas chadaris mandatory. Both sets of misogynists deny women their rights to decide themselves whether they want to wear a miniskirt, a maxiskirt, trousers, a chadari, or whatever. Both say: “That is not her business. That is my business!”

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

The Dutch parliament this afternoon will talk about the bill to have a limited ‘burqa ban’. This means that people will be no longer allowed to wear face-covering clothing in public transport, education, healthcare and government buildings.

It seems that a majority of the House agrees with the plan of Minister Plasterk. Then the Senate must still consider it.

The burqa ban has engaged politicians in The Hague for a long time. The first administration of Prime Minister Rutte, dependent on parliamentary support of [Geert Wilders‘ xenophobic] PVV party, wanted a complete ban on face-covering clothing. That plan disappeared after the fall of that government. …

‘Unnecessary’

The Council of State says that the burqa ban is unnecessary. The advisory body of the government says there are many other opportunities to make people show their faces in the context of safety.

Also Annelies Moors, Professor of Anthropology at the university of Amsterdam, is opposed. She said this morning on the Radio 1 news that in the Netherlands no burqas are worn at all.

There are, according to her, women who wear a face-covering veil, but this group is very small. “About one hundred fifty daily, and between four and five hundred irregularly.”

It is a waste of time and money to take action against them, because these women generally cause no nuisance. The effect can also be that they are hampered in their daily lives because they will no longer be allowed to ride trams.

ANGELA MERKEL SUPPORTS PARTIAL BURKA BAN “The full-face veil is not acceptable in our country,” the German chancellor said. [Willa Frej, HuffPost]

Ancient Egyptian queens, exhibition


This 9 November 2016 Dutch video is about constructing the Queens of the Nile exhibition at the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden.

From Leiden University in the Netherlands:

Exhibition shows luxury and power of Egyptian queens

17 November 2016

The Queens of the Nile exhibition at the National Museum of Antiquities finally affords the wives of the pharoahs the attention they deserve. Thanks to guest curator Olaf Kaper, students and PhD candidates gained valuable experience in museum curating.

History and life at court

Like a child in a sweetshop. That’s how Kaper felt over the past year as he strolled around the world’s most prominent museums on Egypt. Kaper, an egyptologist at Leiden University, was given carte blanche by Leiden’s National Museum of Antiquities to come up with a concept for an exhibition on ancient Egypt. The exhibition had to complement the existing collection, which can be seen from 18 November in a completely new setting at the museum. Why did Kaper opt for ‘Queens of the Nile’? ‘Too little attention has been paid to the wives of the pharoahs, both in science and in the museum world. I wanted to tell their history and show different aspects of life at court.’

Divine status

The exhibition covers a period of some 500 years (1539-1077 BC) and focuses on the five queens of the New Empire: Ahmose Nefertari, Hatsepshut, Tiye, Nefertiti and Nefertari. These women had great political influence and were accorded divine status, Kaper explains. They surrounded themselves with luxury and that’s abundantly clear. The exhibition shows 350 objects, including royal portraits, statues of deities, sumptuous jewellery and valuable accessories such as mirrors set in bronze.

Murder of Ramses III

What does Kaper regard as the prize exhibits? ‘There are so many of them, but two are particularly special: the decorated granite cover of the sarcophagus of Queen Nefertari and a five-metre papyrus. This enormous document is a legal text that describes the conspiracy against and the murder of Pharoah Ramses III by a group of ladies from the harem and a number of officials. It proves that women at that time were by no means happy to accept a subordinate role.’

Students reconstruct the dress of the queens

Kaper carried out new research before the exhibition. Together with students, he reconstructed one of the outfits of the queens. ‘Pharoah Tutankhamun is the only royal whose clothing has been found. There is not a single item of clothing remaining that belonged to the queens, but there are portraits and images of the women from which we were able to reconstruct their dress.’ The result of their search can be seen at the exhibition that includes a mannequin wearing the outfit of a queen, including a stunning gold headdress.

Publications by PhD candidates

‘This exhibition was also an exceptional opportunity for my students and PhD candidates,’ Kaper explains. His students were able to gain research experience and the results of their work can be seen in the museum. Several PhD candidates published an article on their research in the exhibition catalogue. Irene Morfini wrote an article on the artists who constructed the tombs of the kings, and Steffie van Gompel and Petra Hogenboom published on their research on the position of women in Ancient Egypt. Kaper: ‘Thanks to this exhibition, young researchers have also been given a platform. It’s a great example of interaction between the worlds of the museum and academia.’

This is the first major exhibition on the queens of Egypt to be held in the Netherlands. The exhibition will run from 18 November to 17 April 2017. Most of the artefacts are from the Museo Egizio in Turin, the world’s second largest museum on Egypt.

This 17 November 2016 Dutch video is about the Queens of the Nile exhibition at the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden.

Rape legalised in Turkey?


This video says about itself:

15 February 2015

Women have taken to the streets across Turkey to denounce the brutal murder of a student, killed after allegedly resisting a rape attempt by a minibus driver.

Three men have been arrested in connection with the death of Ozgecan Aslan, 20, whose burnt body was found in a riverbed in the southern city of Mersin.

Read more here.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Turkish proposal: marrying after abusing minors

Today, 19:59

Members of the Turkish ruling party AKP have proposed a bill, in which men accused of sexual abuse might marry their underage victims under certain conditions.

Thus they could evade prosecution. The proposal was already adopted by the Turkish Parliament in a first round of voting.

The opposition and human rights organizations have expressed strong criticism. They say that the proposal amounts to amnesty for rape and legalizing child marriages. They are afraid that the new law will be used to enforce marriages.

Over the last decade violence against women has increased in Turkey, the BBC writes. Critics of the government of President Erdogan accusing them that they are increasingly trying to force women into a subordinate role.

Trump Inauguration To Be Met by Mass “Women’s March on Washington”

Image


Women's March on Washington

These Are The Fierce Activists Leading The Women’s March On Washington. Three experienced organizers are leading the charge, taking on everything from day-of logistics to concerns about inclusivity: here.

idealisticrebel

Trump Inauguration To Be Met By Mass ‘Women’s March On Washington’

“We cannot allow ourselves to give up, put our heads down and not hold this administration accountable for any violation of human rights or women’s rights.”

View original post 417 more words