Etruscan women exhibition in 2011


This 2014 video is called Etruscan Necropolises of Cerveteri and Tarquinia (UNESCO/NHK)

Lucas Knitel told on 27 November 2011 about the exhibition on Etruscan women at the Antiquities Museum in Leiden.

This exhibition is the counterpart of the present exhibition about Etruscan men, in the Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam.

In this culture in ancient Italy, women had a relatively strong position (somewhat like Egypt), if compared to Athens and other Greek states, Rome, and Mesopotamia.

We do not know as much about Etruscan culture as we might like. Much of their temples and other buildings were made of wood, so few of these survive. We also know much more about rich Etruscans than about poor ones. And the Etruscan language is still a problem. Not because of their alphabet, similar to the Greek alphabet; but because their language is unrelated to most European languages in antiquity.

There are varous theories on the origins of Etruscans. Eg, Italian nationalists tend to claim they were “autochthonous” ancient Italians. Another theory claims they were immigrants from Asia Minor. Mr Knitel tended to favour a third theory: that Etruscans were immigrants from central Europe. In what is now Austria, the Rhaetic language was spoken in antiquity. It seems that Rhaetian is related to Etruscan.

Bahraini women tortured in 2011


Bahraini women demonstrating for democracy

On the International Day to End Violence against Women, women of Bahrain are constantly subjected to torture, arrests and violence: here.

Bahrain repression continues: here.

Bahraini security forces scatter protest in Wadian village: video here.

Moroccan women not convicted for wearing miniskirts


Moroccan women demonstrate for the right to wear miniskirts

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

No punishment for wearing miniskirt in Morocco

Today, 14:18

Two young women who were prosecuted because they wore miniskirts in Morocco at a market have been acquitted. The judge found that they have committed no offense. The prosecutor had already called for acquittal.

The women of 23 and 26 years old were harrassed in the town Inezgane by two boys. They thought, like some market vendors, that the women behaved immorally by their way of dressing. When the women called the police, not their assailants were arrested, but they themselves.

The arrest sparked uproar in Morocco. In several cities, people took to the streets to demonstrate for more freedom. Men and women put photos on the Internet of themselves in skirts. They called the persecution of the women an attack on individual freedom and gender equality.

The public prosecution department will now consider whether they will prosecute the two boys for assault.

See also here.

British nazi paedophile guilty of murdering schoolgirl


Paige Chiver, left, Robert Ewing, right

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Paige Chivers murder: Neo-nazi paedophile Robert Ewing found guilty of murdering school girl

15-year-old Paige Chivers vanished eight years ago

Siobhan Fenton

Saturday 11 July 2015

A neo-Nazi paedophile has been found guilty of murdering a school girl who vanished eight years ago.

Paige Chivers, 15, disappeared in Blackpool in 2007 following a row with her father. Her body has never been discovered.

Robert Ewing, 60, murdered the schoolgirl after developing an “inappropriate sexual interest” in her, Preston Court heard.

Ewing was also found guilty of perverting the course of justice by intimidating witnesses and providing false information to the police.

Fellow defendant Gareth Dewhurst, 46, was found guilty of perverting the course of justice and helping Ewing dispose of Paige’s body. He was cleared of the charge that he had had sex with her dead body after Ewing killed her.

Paige, who was described as “very troubled and vulnerable” packed two carrier bags with clothes and set off from the family home following the fight with her father. Later that day she was seen at a bus stop talking to an older man, believed to be Ewing.

Forensics found bloodstains containing blood from Ewing and Paige inside Ewing’s flat in 2007. However, he was not charged until last year.

The jury heard that Dewhurst had confessed to a 16-year-old boy whilst he was “heavily stoned” his involvement in the girl’s disappearance. He told the boy that Ewing had killed Paige and then made him have sex with her dead body before forcing him to use his car to dispose of her remains.

The court heard that a fortnight before Paige went missing, Ewing contacted the police with an anonymous tip that a “problem child” had turned up on his doorstep after being evicted by her father. Prosecutors said this was a calculated move to “test the water” and gauge police response. There had been “very little reaction” by officials.

In recordings made by the police, Ewing described himself as a “neo-Nazi”.

Det Supt Andy Webster, who led the investigation, told the Blackpool Gazette: “Paige Chivers was a vulnerable 15-year-old child who disappeared in August 2007.

“The court heard how Robert Ewing carefully groomed Paige before murdering her at his flat in Bispham, Blackpool.

“The prosecution case has been largely circumstantial as Paige’s body has never been recovered. A fundamental part of the prosecution case was that Paige was last seen alive with Robert Ewing, alone in his flat at teatime on Friday August 24, 2007.

“After this point there were no other corroborated sightings of her. Her blood was later found in his flat.

“When she was reported missing he failed to assist the police and then repeatedly lied to them. He has repeatedly sought to implicate other vulnerable people in her murder.

“The jury accepted that his co-accused, Gareth Dewhurst, disposed of Paige’s body and then sought to intimidate and harass witnesses. This included a family to whom he had confessed and who he subsequently sought to terrify.”

Speaking after the sentencing, Paige’s brother-in-law Robert McClelland said that “not a day goes past” when the family does not think about her.

He described Paige as a “bright and funny” girl, adding: “We all have holes in our hearts that can never be replaced.”

The court heard that a police error was made when Paige was reported missing by her father on 26 August, three days after her disappearance. He clearly stated that his daughter was a fifteen year old girl, but her date of birth was wrongly entered as 1962 instead of 1992. This meant that police thought they were investigating the disappearance of a 45 year old woman who had moved away voluntarily, rather than a child missing from home. The error was not corrected until 7 September.

The handling of the case is now being investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Ewing and Dewhurst will both be sentenced on 28 July.

From EDL News in Britain:

EDL/BNP paedophile, Robert Ewing, found guilty of the murder of Paige Chivers

10th July 2015

Over the last three years, the British National Party and the English Defence League have held demonstrations in Blackpool over the murders or missing teenagers Paige Chivers and Charlene Downes, blaming members of the local Muslim population.

Today, BNP/EDL member Robert Ewing has been found guilty of the murder of Paige at Preston Crown Court.

Ewing groomed the vulnerable schoolgirl and then murdered her in August 2007. Paige’s body has never been found.

Among known associates of Ewing were:

Andrew Edge – former EDL Stockport organiser, currently in prison.
Jeffaz Carr – EDL Yorkshire.
Mark Hogg – EDL Peterborough.
Tony Davis aka Arthur Disbury – former Devon EDL activist.
Darren Bird – EDL Wolverhampton supporter who once threatened to kill Muslims in a bid to start a race war.
James Devine – Leader of the self-styled and largely defunct paramilitary group, Combined Ex Forces.
Bob Greensmith – Former Stoke-on-Trent BNP activist.
Rob Brammer – EDL Southampton
Paul Scully Sloane aka Paul Prrk Chops Scully – EDL Telford activist.

None of the above protested the trial of Ewing.

Women in history, new app


This video says about itself:

Women on the Map – SPARK Movement & Field Trip

2 March 2015

SPARK is using Field Trip, an app by Google, to map women’s achievements in history. Learn more here.

By Bethan McKernan in British daily The Independent today:

There’s an app that will send you an alert when you’re near a spot a woman made history

Rediscovering fierce and clever women whose contributions to history have been sadly overlooked? Believe it or not, there’s an app for that.

Spark, a gender equality collective, has designed an app called Women on the Map which does exactly what it says on the tin – every time you are near a place where a woman achieved something extraordinary, your phone will buzz with an alert saying so.

Some members of Spark, a collective of around 30 women under the age of 23, noticed that women’s achievements are not honoured with statues, plaques and street names in the same way men are: in New York City, for example, there are 145 statues of men, and just five of women.

They decided to use modern technology to start rewriting the history books, crowdsourcing the stories of around 119 women in 28 different countries so far.

Anyone can nominate a woman to be included by emailing Spark with 300 words about someone they feel should be included in their community or area who has been neglected by mainstream historical narratives.

“We didn’t want to start with women who everyone had heard of,” Edell told Time. “We want the project to expand what it means to be part of history.” So far, 60 per cent of the stories are about women of color.

If you find yourself near Le Vésinet in Paris, your phone will buzz about Josephine Baker, and in San Francisco you can learn about Mary Ellen Pleasant, who was born in the city as a slave and went on to become a major civil rights activist. If you’re in Lyme Regis, you’ll be told about paleontologist Mary Anning, who discovered fossils of the Plesiosaurus in 1823.

The app is available through Google Field Trip, a background app that sends notifications when you approach significant destinations. Just turn on the ‘Women on the Map’ option and you’re ready to start exploring women’s history.

Moroccan women protest anti-miniskirt policies


This French language video is about a 6 July 2015 demonstration by women in Tunis, Tunisia, for the right to wear a miniskirt.

After a maxiskirt ban in Belgium and France … and after a shorts ban for women in Israel … after miniskirt bans in Italy, New York City, and Hungary … now Morocco.

From Morocco World News:

Moroccan Women Wear Mini-skirts in Protest Against Arrest of Two Women

Saturday 27 June 2015 – 09:52

Rabat- Many Moroccan women are publishing pictures of themselves wearing mini-skirts to show solidarity with two women facing charges of “gross indecency”.

Several Moroccan women turned out for the protest against the arrest of two women in Inezgane, a suburb of the southern city of Agadir. The two women were arrested “gross indecency” for wearing “tight and immoral” clothes.

Women participating in the virtual protest posted pictures of themselves on social media wearing miniskirts to support the two women—hairdressers aged 23 and 29– whose trial has been set for July 16.

“Although I believe that online campaigns do not result in a significant impact, but I decided to participate in solidarity with the two victims, and also because I myself suffer from harassment when I wear short clothes,” one woman who participated in the campaign told news website Hespress.

“Wearing a skirt is not an offence against the society’s public morals and does not question its history and traditions,” another woman told the Arabic-speaking website. It is a component of identity and a symbol of femininity that has existed since ages.”

“What has changed is the way we look at women which must be changed because women are part of the process of building the country and not a subject of guardianship. Criminalizing the wearing of skirts will only lead to the legitimization of violence against women,” she added.

Three sit-ins are also expected to be held this week in Agadir, Rabat and Casablanca to denounce the trial of the two women.

Two Facebook pages have been created to support the ordeal of the two young women. In both of them, many Moroccan women share pictures of themselves wearing minis-skirts with the hash tag “mettre une robe n’est pas un crime (wearing a skirt is not crime).

Yesterday, 6 July 2015, the two women appeared in court. There were solidarity demonstrations with them in various Moroccan cities.

An Internet petition supporting the right of Moroccan women to wear miniskirts is here.

Opposition to miniskirts is colonialist: Zimbabwe vice president: here.