Candidates Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, foreign policy


This 4 December 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

Bernie Sanders is distancing himself from [Elizabeth] Warren. Cenk Uygur, Emma Vigeland, and Ana Kasparian, hosts of The Young Turks, break it down.

From Politico:

Bernie Sanders‘ revolution has gone global.

As the Vermont senator battles Elizabeth Warren for the left wing of the Democratic Party, he’s increasingly tried to find an edge on foreign policy. Sanders has portrayed his candidacy as one part of a worldwide worker-led movement, praised … leftist leaders across the globe, and tried to articulate a foreign policy further afield of the establishment than Warren’s.

Sanders’ foreign policy views are a clear mark of distinction from Warren in a race in which their domestic agendas are viewed as very similar.

That view may not be 100% correct. As Senator Warren at first backed a Medicare For All plan similar to Sanders’; but later backtracked.

Left-wing leaders around the world see an ally in Sanders — Brazil’s Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva recently thanked him for his “solidarity” and Bolivia‘s ousted Evo Morales called him “hermano Bernie Sanders” — but have not publicly embraced Warren in the same way.

Tokyo Olympics and Fukushima nuclear disaster


This 18 October 2019 South Korean TV video says about itself:

Tokyo Olympics faces difficulties with sweltering heat, Fukushima radiation

The Tokyo Olympics are less than a year away,… but the global sporting event is already being plagued by difficulties.

Tokyo’s notoriously hot and humid summer has prompted the International Olympic Committee to move the marathon to a cooler part of Japan for the safety of the participants.

Choi Jeong-yoon reports.

The 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 24th to August 9th next year.

At that time of the year, highs in the Japanese capital can hit a sweltering 40 degrees Celsius.

During the same period this year, around 50 people died due to the intense heat and thousands were hospitalized.

In order to protect athletes from the scorching heat, the International Olympic Committee has announced plans to shift the location of the marathon and the walking races to Sapporo, Hokkaido, a cooler northern island in Japan.

Some 800 kilometers north of Tokyo, the region is, on average, five degrees Celsius cooler than the capital.

The IOC’s sudden announcement is causing headaches for the 2020 organizers as they had already scheduled tours taking in spots along the original marathon course and had been preparing to promote it worldwide.

“The plan to move those events from Tokyo to Sapporo was a bit of surprise. To be honest, we only received this news several days ago.”

There are also growing concerns about radiation.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe previously insisted the crippled Fukushima power plant was nothing to worry about when Tokyo was bidding for the Games in 2013.

However, with Typhoon Hagibis striking Fukushima, Japan’s poor management of the contaminated waste was laid bare.

Despite forecasts predicting torrential downpours, storage was not sufficient to stop an unknown number of bags containing contaminated waste from floating away and disappearing.

Local officials insist the incident will not affect the environment, but half of the bags that were retrieved were found to be empty.

Statement of IPPNW Germany regarding participation in the Olympic Games in Japan:

In July 2020, the Olympic Games will start in Japan. Young athletes from all over the world have been preparing for these games for years and millions of people are looking forward to this major event.

We at IPPNW Germany are often asked whether it is safe to travel to these Olympic Games in Japan either as a visitor or as an athlete or whether we would advise against such trips from a medical point of view. We would like to address these questions.

To begin with, there are many reasons to be critical of the Olympic Games in general: the increasing commercialization of sports, the lack of sustainability of sports venues, doping scandals, the waste of valuable resources for an event that only takes place for several weeks and corruption in the Olympic organizations to name just a few. However, every four years, the Olympic Games present a unique opportunity for many young people from all over the world to meet other athletes and to celebrate a fair sporting competition – which was the initial vision of the Olympic movement. Also, the idea of Olympic peace and mutual understanding between nations and people is an important aspect for us as a peace organization.

Fukushima…and no end in sight

Regarding the Olympic Games in Japan, another factor comes into play: the Japanese government is using the Olympic Games to deflect from the ongoing nuclear catastrophe in the Northeast of the country.

The government wants people to think that the situation in Fukushima is under control and people in the region are safe from radioactive contamination. The president of the German Olympic Sports Association, Alfons Hörmann, recently went so far as to say that “the regions close to the Olympic Games are safe from environmental disasters”.

Of course, this is an untenable assertion for a region with extremely high seismic activity. Regarding the situation around the destroyed nuclear reactors in Fukushima, the situation is far from “under control” even today. External cooling water has to be continuously circulated through the ruins of the damaged reactors. Inside, life-threatening radiation doses still prevail. Large parts of the contaminated cooling-water is still flowing into the sea or leaches into groundwater despite major efforts by the Japanese authorities to contain it. The rest of the radioactive wastewater is being stored in huge tanks on site. Their contamination with hazardous radioisotopes like Strontium-90 presents an ongoing threat to the region.

In December of 2018, data regarding thyroid tests were published. The incidence of thyroid cancer among tested children in Fukushima is 15 times higher than the Japanese average for this age bracket.

We are also seeing a distinct geographic distribution, with a significantly higher incidence of thyroid cancer in the most heavily contaminated regions.

With each storm, radioactive particles from the forests and mountains are brought back to the villages and cities – even to those previously decontaminated. International regulations stipulate that the population should not be exposed to more than one millisievert of additional radiation after a nuclear accident. In areas around Fukushima already earmarked for resettlement, the population will be exposed to radiation dosages that can range up to 20 mSv. As an organization of physicians, we have repeatedly pointed out the resulting health risks for the population of the affected regions, which we consider unacceptable.

While the nuclear catastrophe is a daily reality for the people living in the area and will be for many years to come, the situation for visitors is of course different. To answer the question of whether a trip to Japan or participation in the Olympic Games is acceptable from a medical point of view, a variety of aspects must be taken into consideration:

General information regarding radiation risks

Generally, the radiation exposure in the contaminated regions in Japan poses increased health risks. However, especially for short-term visits, these risks can be considered small – as long as individuals are not specifically sensitive to radiation. But it needs to be stressed that there is no threshold in radiation dose, below which it could be considered safe or without negative effects on health.

The individual disposition and the risk for a radiation-induced disease normally remains undetected and individuals themselves are often not aware of their sensitivity. Once a person falls sick, you can draw conclusions by working backward and may find increased radiation sensitivity (e.g. for breast cancer patients with the BRCA-1/2-mutation).

For pregnant women and small children, we generally recommend to refrain from intercontinental flights and to avoid visits to the contaminated areas in Japan to minimize individual radiation doses. Until today, there are still hot-spots, even in the decontaminated regions – places where radioactive particles from the Fukushima meltdowns have accumulated and were overlooked during the decontamination efforts or places that were recontaminated by rain, pollen flight or flooding. These hot-spots pose an ongoing risk for the residents of the region. Even in the greater Tokyo area, hot-spots were detected in the past.

It is important to know that even when radiation exposure limits are met, certain health risks cannot be ruled out. Exposure limits are derived from the politically acceptable risk of disease that the government thinks the population would be willing to accept. The question is not “At which dose can we expect health risks to occur?” but rather “Which health risks are still acceptable for society?”

Radioactivity in any dosage, however small, can trigger a disease – the higher the dose, the higher the risk. As with smoking and other cancer-inducing factors, there is no “safe” dose. Even natural background radioactivity can trigger diseases. While natural background radiation can mostly not be avoided, we recommend trying to avoid additional radiation exposure as best as possible in order to lower the individual risk of contracting radiation-induced diseases such as cancer.

We can only hope that there will be no further recontamination in Japan caused by storms, earthquakes, forest fires, flooding or technical failures at the damaged reactors, which could put the Olympic Games in Japan at risk.

How you travel

For most visitors, the flight to Japan and back will probably present the highest single radiation exposure. Depending on solar activity, length, height, and routing of the flight, the radiation dose for a flight from Europe to Japan is between 45 and 110 microsieverts (μSv) per flight – about the same dose you are exposed to during a normal chest x-ray. The exact radiation dose resulting from a flight can be calculated on the website of Munich Helmholtz-Institute.

Where you travel

While large parts of Japan have remained relatively unaffected by the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe, there are still radiation hot-spots in the prefectures of Fukushima, Tochigi, Ibaraki, Miyagi and Chiba. Inhalation or ingestion of radioactive particles with food or water poses a considerable health risk. It is not sufficient to rely on officially published dose measurements, as even previously decontaminated areas can always become recontaminated with radioactive particles from the forests and mountains around Fukushima through pollen, rains, forest fires or storms.

Some areas around Fukushima remain closed to the public due to elevated radiation levels, others have been reopened after decontamination measures were performed. In metropolitan areas, like in Fukushima City, most monitoring posts record radiation levels below 0.2 microsieverts per hour (0.2 μSv/h). This corresponds to common background values registered in other parts of the world. Background radiation is a continuous source of radiation that depends largely on the local geographical soil composition. Background radiation contributes to numerous cancers and cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Unlike background radiation, which can hardly be avoided, manmade radiation stemming from nuclear weapons testing or the nuclear industry can be confronted politically. A regularly updated map of the official monitoring post in the prefecture can be found (in Japanese) on line.

However, these official measurements need to be treated with caution since the authorities have a vested interest in systematically downplaying radiation effects and ambient dose levels. While officially published dose levels can be low, just a few meters away from the monitoring post you can find local hot-spots due to contaminated foliage, dust or pollen.

A discussion regarding the actual radiation levels in Japan is difficult since the Japanese government has forfeited a lot of trust through questionable methods, for example by installing shielding lead batteries in the measuring instruments or positioning the monitoring posts in blind spots and other protected areas. Independent monitoring posts installed by independent citizen groups often register much higher values than the official posts.

Unfortunately, for symbolic as well as political reasons, sport arenas in Fukushima were selected to hold softball and baseball competitions during the Olympic Games 2020. Even the symbolic first competitions of the Olympics are to be held here. At the same time, the competition calendar was arranged in a way to ensure that no western teams would compete here. This may sound cynical, but it seems that the organizers expected problems regarding acceptance of these sensitive venues. Consequently, European visitors and athletes will most likely not have to travel to Fukushima in order to compete or watch their team.

If people do plan to travel to Fukushima, they should avoid trips to the mountains or forests and also avoid close contact with dust, dirt, foliage, or other possibly contaminated substances. In the event of high pollen flight, forest fires or natural disasters such as earthquakes, flooding or storms, they should exercise caution. FFP-breathing masks, as well as staying indoors, can offer relative protection against inhalation of radioactive particles. Visitors should make sure to pay attention to and follow the instructions issued by local authorities.

Japan is a country with high seismic activity and earthquakes are a common occurrence, as are forest fires in the summer and storms at any time of the year. To familiarize foreign visitors with the right behavior during emergencies, the Japanese tourism agency has established a website as well as a mobile app called “Safety Tips” with up-to-date information and safety advice.

What you eat

The official dose limits for radioactivity in food in Japan are currently stricter than those in the European Union. This means that contaminated foodstuff not fit for sale on the Japanese markets could very well be sold in Europe without any special labeling or warnings. The dose limit for general foodstuff Japan is 500 Becquerel (Bq) per kilogram, while in the EU it is 600 Bq/kg. One example of this difference: blueberry jam sold in the EU had to be taken off the shelves in Japan due to excessive cesium levels (originating from the Chernobyl disaster). More information can be found here.

Food controls in Japan are rather meticulous, but naturally, it can never be guaranteed that no contaminated foodstuff reaches the shelf. The individual measurement data can be seen at www.new-fukushima.jp, but it cannot be excluded that conspicuous values were prefiltered and do not show up in the statistics. At best, this website can help understand which foodstuffs are regularly tested in Japan.

We strongly recommend avoiding products bought directly from farmers in the contaminated regions, since they are often not monitored. Also, dubious “solidarity events” specifically offering foodstuffs from the contaminated regions should be avoided. Apart from these exceptions, it can be assumed that foodstuff declared safe for sale in Japan complies with high safety standards.

Summary note

In summary, it can be said that the health risk for visitors and athletes participating in the Olympics for short periods of time is small – as long as there is no specific individual sensitivity to radiation. Pregnant women and small children should avoid long-distance flights and trips to Fukushima to protect themselves against radiation.

At the same time, we should all be aware of the continuing problems facing the population in the radioactively contaminated regions in the Northeast of Japan, who has to live with the ongoing nuclear catastrophe on a daily basis.

The Olympic Games should not be abused to distract from their fate but rather to make sure their needs, worries, and demands are properly addressed. The German affiliate of IPPNW is trying to do just that with its campaign “Tokyo 2020 – The Radioactive Olympics”.

The International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), was founded in 1980 and won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. It is a non-partisan federation of national medical groups in 64 countries, representing tens of thousands of doctors, medical students, other health workers, and concerned citizens who share the common goal of creating a more peaceful and secure world freed from the threat of nuclear annihilation.

This 9 March 2019 AFP video says about itself:

Fukushima evacuees resist return as Olympics near

With Japan keen to flaunt Tokyo 2020 as the “Reconstruction Olympics”, people who fled the Fukushima nuclear disaster are being urged to return home but not everyone is eager to go.

IPPNW has launched a “Nuclear-Free Olympic Games 2020” campaign to call for a worldwide phase-out of nuclear power and to sound the alarm about the Japanese government’s efforts to use the 2020 Tokyo Olympics to “normalize” the aftermath of the still on-going Fukushima nuclear accident. Here, four members of IPPNW Europe outline the campaign and the reasoning behind it.

By Annette Bänsch-Richter-Hansen, Jörg Schmid, Henrik Paulitz and Alex Rosen:

In 2020, Japan is inviting athletes from around the world to take part in the Tokyo Olympic Games. We are hoping for the games to be fair and peaceful. At the same time, we are worried about plans to host baseball and softball competitions in Fukushima City, just 50 km away from the ruins of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. It was here, in 2011, that multiple nuclear meltdowns took place, spreading radioactivity across Japan and the Pacific Ocean – a catastrophe comparable only to the nuclear meltdown of Chernobyl.

The ecological and social consequences of that catastrophe can be seen everywhere in the country: whole families uprooted from their ancestral homes, deserted evacuation zones, hundreds of thousands of bags of irradiated soil dumped all over the country, contaminated forests, rivers and lakes.

Normality has not returned to Japan. The reactors continue to be a radiation hazard as further catastrophes could occur at any time. Every day adds more radioactive contamination to the ocean, air and soil. Enormous amounts of radioactive waste are stored on the premises of the power plant in the open air. Should there be another earthquake, these would pose a grave danger to the population and the environment.

The nuclear catastrophe continues today. On the occasion of the Olympic Games 2020, we are planning an international campaign. Our concern is that athletes and visitors to the games could be harmed by the radioactive contamination in the region, especially those people more vulnerable to radiation, children and pregnant women.

According to official Japanese government estimates, the Olympic Games will cost more than the equivalent of 12 billion Euros. At the same time, the Japanese government is threatening to cut support to all evacuees who are unwilling to return to the region. International regulations limit the permitted dose for the general public of additional radiation following a nuclear accident to 1 mSv per year.

In areas where evacuation orders were recently lifted, the returning population will be exposed to levels up to 20 mSv per year. Even places that have undergone extensive decontamination efforts could be recontaminated at any time by unfavourable weather conditions, as mountains and forests serve as a continuous depot for radioactive particles.

Our campaign will focus on educating the public about the dangers of the nuclear industry. We will explain what health threats the Japanese population was and is exposed to today. Even during normal operations, nuclear power plants pose a threat to public health – especially to infants and unborn children. There is still no safe permanent depository site for the toxic inheritance of the nuclear industry anywhere on earth, that is a fact.

We plan to use the media attention generated by the Olympic Games to support Japanese initiatives calling for a nuclear phase-out and to promote a worldwide energy revolution: away from fossil and nuclear fuels and towards renewable energy generation.

We need to raise awareness of the involvement of political representatives around the world in the military-industrial complex. We denounce the attempt of the Japanese government to pretend that normality has returned to the contaminated regions of Japan. We call on all organizations to join our network and help us put together a steering group to coordinate this campaign. The Olympic Games are less than a year away– now is still time to get organized.

Big anti-Trump anti-NATO demonstration, London this Tuesday


This July 2018 video says about itself:

Belgium: Anti-war protest hits Brussels ahead of Trump‘s NATO visit

Anti-war activists protested in Brussels on Saturday against the upcoming NATO summit on July 11-12, which US President Donald Trump is also expected to visit.

The protesters held up numerous banners denouncing the NATO and Trump, such as ‘Stop the war coalition‘, ‘NATO game over’ and ‘Make peace great again.’

Donald Trump is coming to London, England for a NATO summit conference. He is pressuring other NATO governments, like Germany and Belgium, to waste even more taxpayers’ money on ‘defence’ bloody neocolonial warmongering.

There will be a big demonstration against Trump and NATO in London this Tuesday.

Anti-Trump demonstration in London

This photo shows part of a big demonstration in London during another Trump visit.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Friday, November 29, 2019

NHS staff frontline for Trump demo

NHS nurses and doctors will lead the march against Donald Trump’s visit to Britain on Tuesday in a show of defiance against US privatisation plans, protest organisers said today.

On Thursday Labour released documents it said were “proof” that the NHS was “up for sale” under a new trade deal between the US and Britain.

One of the protest organisers, Global Justice Now (GJN), which has also played a role in exposing the planned trade deal, said that the demonstration would show Mr Trump that “Britain is not for sale.”

GJN’s Nick Dearden said: “This week we discovered just how great a threat Donald Trump is to our NHS.

“That’s why Tuesday’s demonstration will be led by nurses and doctors — to symbolise the millions of people who will stand up for our health service against a US President who simply represents the biggest, greediest corporate interests in the world.”

The demonstration will assemble at Trafalgar Square, London, from 4pm onwards before finishing at Canada Gate, opposite Buckingham Palace, at 5.45pm.

Anti-Trump demonstration

From the organisers of the demonstration:

No to Trump – No to NATO – National Demonstration

03 December 2019

Assemble: Trafalgar Sq, London – 4PM

March to Buckingham Palace

Facebook event here

Organised by: Stop the War Coalition & CND

4pm: Assemble on south of Trafalgar Sq. for speeches & music

5pm: March leaves Trafalgar Sq. to Buckingham Palace via The Mall

5.45pm: Arrives at Canada Gate opp. Buckingham Palace

6pm: NATO reception begins

7pm: R3 Soundsystem – Dance Music Against Trump at Buckingham Gate

We are encouraging everyone to bring glow sticks and fairy lights etc for visibility as well as horns, whistles, pots, pans and other instruments to make as much noise as possible at the protest.

Donald Trump is coming to London in December for the NATO Heads of State summit. On Tuesday 3rd December, the Queen will be hosting a reception for NATO leaders at Buckingham Palace and it’s crucial we raise our voices against the world’s largest nuclear-armed military alliance which is overseen by one of the most reckless US Presidents in history.

Donald Trump is a racist, a misogynist and a climate change denier who threatens communities at home while destabilising the rest of the globe.

NATO, as an aggressive and expansionist nuclear and military alliance, plays a dangerous global role – it’s still in Afghanistan 18 years on and is expanding further into Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Latin America. Turkey, a NATO member, is currently attacking the Kurds in North Eastern Syria.

The summit is a crucial opportunity for our movement to oppose Trump, his nuclear warmongering, interventionism and destructive social and political agenda. Let’s unite against war and military aggression and ensure President Trump’s visit to Britain will be met with the response that it deserves.

Assemble at 4PM in Trafalgar Square on 3rd December for music and speeches before we march to Buckingham Palace saying loud and clear: no to Trump, no to NATO!

Chilean right-wing government blinds people, people protest


Chilean protest against blinding demonstrators, EPA photo

This EPA [hoto from Chile shows, from left to right: demonstrator’s sign with photos of anti-austerity protesters who lost eyes to police and military violence; a demonstrator with eyepatch; a sign, saying (translated): The government authorizes the death of the people.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

In the Chilean capital Santiago, protesters have drawn attention to the crackdown by the police

Not just by police, also by the military for the first time since the fall of the Pinochet dictatorship.

in the country’s protest wave. They mainly expressed support for people who were shot at by the police and lost their eyes.

Some demonstrators marched wearing eyepatches in protest. Others showed pictures of people with eye damage. According to ophthalmologists, more than 200 people were blinded during demonstrations and fifty people had to get an eye prosthesis.

“In Chile, asking for dignity costs you an eye”, one of the banners says.

Chilean demonstrator with photos of blinded people, AFP photo

In the South American country it has been restless for forty days. Masses of people are angry about President Piñera’s policies and growing inequality. The police are cracking down and have arrested thousands of people.

Many people are said to have become blind because policemen fired bullets at them. Other eye damage was caused by tear gas shells.