Avoiding snakebite harm


This video from the USA says about itself:

14 August 2015

The bull snake hissing, rattling its tail, striking, and all its charms in this video of treasures found and released all over the Great Plains.

From eNature Blog in the USA:

Do You Know How To Treat A Snakebite?

Posted on Friday, July 15, 2016 by eNature

It’s the height of summer and folks throughout the country are visiting parks, hiking through the woods, or otherwise enjoying the outdoors. At the same time, lots of other, non-human, creatures are on the move.

Chances are high you might encounter a snake or two if you’re out. But don’t panic— they’re actually pretty harmless creatures.

Even in areas where there are many venomous snake species, few people ever encounter them, and fewer yet run any real risk of being bitten. Most snakes, even the ones with the worst reputations, will choose to flee when they sense your presence. Snakes usually bite as a last resort.

Remember, fangs and venom evolved primarily for prey capture, not as a defense mechanism. Most snakebites in this country come as a result of people trying to handle or otherwise harass or move the snake; avoid this type of behavior and you will probably never get bitten.

How To Avoid Snakebites

Here are some steps you can take to avoid snakebites:

-Before venturing out into the wilderness, familiarize yourself with the snakes of your area, both venomous and non-venomous species.
-Learn which habitats the venomous species in your region are likely to be encountered in, and use caution when in those habitats.
-Always take a buddy into the field with you.
-Wear boots and loose-fitting pants if you are venturing into venomous snake territory.
-Try as much as possible not to take a snake by surprise. Stay on trails, and watch where you place your hands and feet, especially when climbing or stepping over fences, large rocks, and logs, or when collecting firewood.

How To Treat Snakebites

Despite what we often see in moves or television, venomous snakebites are rare—and if they do happen, they’re are rarely fatal to humans. Of the 8,000 snakebite victims in the United States each year, only about 10 to 15 die. However, for any snakebite the best course of action is to get medical care as soon as possible.

And unlike in movies—never try to suck the venom out of wound with your mouth. Nothing good will come of doing that. Instead, follow the steps below:

-Try to keep the snakebite victim still, as movement helps the venom spread through the body.
-Keep the injured body part motionless and just below heart level.
-Keep the victim warm, calm, and at rest, and transport him or her immediately to medical care. Do not allow him to eat or drink anything.
-If medical care is more than half an hour away, wrap a bandage a few inches above the bite, keeping it loose enough to enable blood flow (you should be able to fit a finger beneath it). Do not cut off blood flow with a tight tourniquet. Leave the bandage in place until reaching medical care.
– If you have a snakebite kit, wash the bite, and place the kit’s suction device over the bite. (Do not suck the poison out with your mouth.) Do not remove the suction device until you reach a medical facility.
– Try to identify the snake so the proper antivenin can be administered, but do not waste time or endanger yourself trying to capture or kill it.
-If you are alone and on foot, start walking slowly toward help, exerting the injured area as little as possible. If you run or if the bite has delivered a large amount of venom, you may collapse, but a snakebite seldom results in death.

Most painful plant arrives at botanical garden


This video says about itself:

Most Painful Plant

31 January 2015

The gympie gympie plant has an excruciatingly painful sting. It’s one of the most venomous plants in the world.

Its sting is infamously agonizing. An officer once killed himself in order to escape the pain. It’s from the gympie gympie plant, and here’s what you need to know to survive.

What is it?

The gympie gympie plant, or Dendrocnide moroides, is one of the world’s most venomous plants with large, heart-shaped leaves. It’s known as a stinging because because of its stinging hairs that deliver a potent neurotoxin when its leaf is touched. The pain from a sting has been described as unbearable, driving its victims to the point of madness. Stories have been told of horses jumping off cliffs after being stung just to escape the pain. It was extensive[ly] studied for years by Dr. Marina Hurley.

Where is it located?

Gympie gympies are native to the rainforest areas of northeastern Australia, the Maluku Islands (Moluccas), and Indonesia. They’re large shrubs with bright pink fruits whose seeds germinate and flower in full sunlight after soil disturbances.

How will it kill you?

The entire gympie gympie plant is covered in fine, silicon-like hairs that embed themselves in your body after which they release a painful toxin. Breathing them in can cause severe sneezing fits and nosebleeds. Stings start out as a painful burning sensations that grow more and more intense over the next half hour. It can then lead to aching joints and swelling under your armpits as well as vomiting due to the intensity of the pain. The pain can last from a few days up to several months. Also, it can become so severe that it can eventually lead to shock followed by death.

How to survive:

Gympie gympie stings are felt immediately and its hairs must be removed right away in order for the pain to subside. The recommended treatment is to apply diluted hydrochloric acid onto the affected skin areas then pulling the hairs out with a wax hair removal strip. If you don’t remove all the gympie gympie hairs, they can keep releasing their toxin into your skin for up to a year.

The Leiden botanical garden reports that this week, a gympie gympie plant has been added to their collection; not to the part of the collection open to the public, because of the danger of the sting.

The gympie gympie plant is related to stinging nettles; however, its sting is about a hundred times worse.

Fukushima, Japan disaster update


This 20 June 2016 video is called Fukushima rice to be sold in Britain.

7 million Bq of all β nuclides leaked as contaminated water in Fukushima plant: here.

Radioactive cesium fallout on Tokyo from Fukushima concentrated in glass microparticles: here.

Solar energy in Japan: here.

Fukushima rice will be available for sale in the UK starting in July. It will also be supplied to some restaurants in the city. … As was found in Taiwan, many times Japanese foods are not tested at all before being exported to other countries. Mixing of contaminated crops with those of lesser or no contamination is also not currently banned in Japan. The rice being exported from Fukushima is a variety called Ten no Tsubu: here.

Iraqi boy lost family, arms to Pentagon, now facing racism in Britain


This video says about itself:

Exclusive: Ali Abbas blames Britain and the US for troubles in Iraq

23 June 2014

12 year old Ali Abbas lost both of his arms and was severely burnt in a US missile strike on Baghdad. His mother and father and other members of his family were killed.

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

‘Why don’t you go back to your country?’ UK border official allegedly asks man orphaned in the UK-US invasion of Iraq

Ali Abbas, who as a 12-year-old lost both arms and 16 family members in a US airstrike, says he was brought close to tears by a UK official

Adam Lusher

The orphan whose family was killed and who was himself maimed by a missile fired by Western forces in the Iraq War has said he was brought close to tears by a British border official who told him to “Go back to your country”.

On the eve of the Chilcot report into Britain’s role in Iraq, Ali Abbas who as a 12-year-old became a symbol of the war’s victims, said a border force security guard at London St Pancras station questioned his right to live in the UK after he returned on the Eurostar from a trip to Belgium.

Mr Abbas, now 25 and a British citizen, lost his mother, father, younger brother and 13 other family members when an American missile struck his home on the southern edge of Baghdad on 30 March 2013.

Both his arms had to be amputated and he suffered burns to 60 per cent of his body. Photographed in an Iraqi hospital, he became the face of victims of the UK and US-led invasion.

Thanks to money donated by the British public, he was able to come to England for treatment. With no sign of the death and destruction in his home country abating, he took British citizenship in 2010.

He has a younger half-brother who is now in the Iraqi army fighting on the front line against Isis.

But he told The Independent that when he returned on the Eurostar at about 6.30pm on 18 April, the only people stopped by security were him and his Iraqi-born friend Ahmed Hamza, who like him had grown up in England after losing limbs – a lower leg and a hand – in a coalition attack.

He said: “I was telling my friend I was so happy to come back home. Because Britain is my home now.  And then the security man stopped only us – because we were the ones who looked not British.

“This person brought tears into my eyes. He didn’t give me any chance to say anything. He took our British passports and said ‘Why don’t you go back to your country?  Why are you living here?”

“I told him this is what happened to us and Britain brought us here.”

“He could clearly see I had no arms,” Mr Abbas added. “This is what happened to me because of the war. It is only because of the war that I am in Britain.

“But he was shaking his head as he looked at my passport. He said: ‘It’s a British Government decision, but I’m not happy with it.’

“I was so upset, so shocked.”

Mr Abbas insisted that the vast majority of British people had been kind to him.

He said: “Of course, you will find bad people everywhere, but the British are really good people.”

Mr Abbas added, however: “Britain has changed in the last couple of years, because of what they hear about Isis. They are always thinking Muslims when they speak about Isis. But 99 per cent of Isis’ victims are Muslim. People here need to know that Isis are not Muslims. They have nothing to do with my religion.”

As he awaited Sir John Chilcot’s report into the Iraq war, Mr Abbas also told The Independent that he would like to ask Tony Blair “whether he regrets what he has done”.

He said: “Of course I am angry. I have to blame them [Bush and Blair]. They should not have gone to war. They should have done a better job with the reconstruction. I have lost my arms, my parents, my brother.  And you can see what is happening to my country.”

He added: “They took away one Saddam Hussein and gave us many, many Saddam Husseins: killers, and also the corruption, because Iraq is so corrupt now.

“I didn’t like Saddam. He was a dictator. But now the situation is probably worse. Lots and lots of people are still being killed. I don’t know anyone who hasn’t lost a member of their family. My country is gone, destroyed.”

The Independent has asked the Home Office for comment on the incident at the Eurostar terminal.

Chilcot report: How Tony Blair and George W Bush’s ‘liberation’ of Iraq backfired

Chilcot report: Tony Blair planned to go to war before UN resolution, says former naval chief. ‘They’d bloody decided. That’s the reality,’ says Admiral Lord West: here.